Author Topic: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED  (Read 53116 times)

Chris

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Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
« Reply #15 on: June 19, 2009, 03:41:31 AM »
Yeah that was good news! those guys who thought they got away with it and then get busted decades later... that is just wonderful. Must be twice as hard to be arrested then.

t-lynne

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Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
« Reply #16 on: January 16, 2011, 08:48:23 AM »
WINNIPEG - Her killing haunted Winnipeggers for decades, a 'cold case' whose secrets many feared would never be revealed.

Now, 26 years later, a trial is set to begin for the man police and prosecutors allege killed 13-year-old Candace Derksen.

Mark Edward Grant, 46, is charged with first-degree murder.

Derksen disappeared while walking home from Mennonite Brethren Collegiate on Nov. 30, 1984, sparking a massive search effort.

The search ended Jan. 17, 1985, when an Alsip's Industrial Products employee found Derksen's frozen body in a rarely-used tool shed near the Nairn Avenue overpass, about 500 metres from her home. Her hands and feet were bound behind her back, making it impossible for her to escape. She died of exposure.

Police arrested Grant in 2007 after he submitted a blood sample to the national data bank. Grant was interviewed by police in the during the initial investigation into Derksen's disappearance, but was not deemed to be a suspect at he time.

Wilma and Cliff Derksen told QMI Agency in 2007 that they had come to terms with the fact they may never find out what happened to their daughter. Grant's arrest nearly four years ago shook their world.

"Wilma and I have to admit that we had actually given up hope. We were already prepared to live with this mystery that has shadowed our family for so many years," Cliff Derksen said, reading from a statement, after police confirmed they had a high-risk sex offender in custody for the 1984 slaying.

The case touched many Winnipegers, including the officers charged with finding Derksen's killer.

"It's been a very, very disturbing case. It still haunts a lot of people," former police Chief Jack Ewatski, a homicide investigator at the time of the murder, told QMI Agency in 2001. "Every time I drive over the Nairn overpass, it brings back memories.

"To me, she died a horrible death knowing her cries for help were going unanswered. She must have felt very hopeless and very alone."

Grant was committed to stand trial following a preliminary hearing in 2009.

Jury selection was completed earlier this month. The trial is set to last a month.

The Crown is expected to call 34 witnesses, including three DNA scientists.

Jurors are expected to hear their first witness on Thursday.






t-lynne

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Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
« Reply #17 on: January 16, 2011, 08:54:27 AM »
I am thinking somebody should just tie this 'monster' up and leave him to die in the cold...I am shocked that he could even live with himself for 26 years knowing that he left that little girl, bound,hurt, scared, cold.... 500 METERS from her home!!!  BASTARD!! (sorry for the expletive) but OMG!!
« Last Edit: January 16, 2011, 09:28:15 AM by t-lynne »

AlbertaCowboy

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Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
« Reply #18 on: January 17, 2011, 06:14:36 PM »
Finally!

26 years to the day Candace Derksen's remains were found in a tool shed just south of the Nairn Overpass in Winnipeg, the main suspect Mark Edward Grant is finally put on trail for the killing.

http://www.ctv.ca/CTVNews/TopStories/20110117/man-goes-on-trial-for-1984-murder-110117/

The trail is expected to last until late February.

capeheart

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Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
« Reply #19 on: January 17, 2011, 07:00:59 PM »
I saw this on the Global News this evening and am very happy that this case was solved. What a monster to do this to this young girl. The horrible death, but finally closure after all these years for her mom and dad. RIP Candice Derksen, and there will finally be justice in your loss of life in such a violent manner. ::) ::) ::) :o :o :o

t-lynne

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Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
« Reply #20 on: January 20, 2011, 08:39:07 PM »
DNA to be key factor in 26-year-old murder case
By DEAN PRITCHARD, QMI Agency

Last Updated: January 20, 2011 6:32pm
.WINNIPEG - It's been 26 years since Candace Derksen was left to die in a tool shed on a cold Winnipeg night.

But the passage of time doesn't mean the case against her accused killer is a complex one, a jury was told Thursday.

"The evidence is fairly straight-forward," Crown attorney Mike Himmelman said in his opening address to jurors in the first-degree murder trial of Mark Grant.

Derksen, 13, disappeared while walking home from Mennonite Brethren Collegiate on Nov. 30, 1984. Her frozen body was discovered Jan. 17, 1985 in a tool shed at Alsip's Industrial Products, near the Nairn Avenue overpass.

Himmelman alleged Derksen was still alive when Grant bound her hands and ankles together behind her back and abandoned her in the tool shed. The temperature that night dropped to -25 C.

Because Derksen died while being confined, her death is first-degree murder, Himmelman told jurors. He alleged Grant's DNA was found on the twine used to bind Derksen's limbs. Several hairs found at the scene were later identified as belonging to Grant, Himmelman said.

Retired Winnipeg Police Service sergeant Murray Allan was among several identification unit officers called to the scene after the discovery of Derksen's body.

"She was frozen stiff," he testified.

Allan said police seized several items from the scene, including a gym bag and three chewed pieces of gum. Two logs found in the shed were sent to the RCMP hair and fibre section for analysis.

Allan said days later he and another officer returned to the scene, where Allan bound the other officer in the same fashion Derksen had been found.

"He was able to roll around on his back and his front and his side, (but) he was unable to stand up," Allan said.

Already, the trial is promising to hinge on a battle over DNA.

Court heard the Derksen case was the first time the identification unit assumed responsibility for a crime scene investigation. Defence lawyer Saull Simmonds questioned what police did to protect the crime scene from contamination.

"You weren't in a position at that stage that the preservation of DNA was even a consideration," Simmonds said.

Simmonds said Allan or other officers could have contaminated the scene by "coughing, sneezing, or blowing (their) noses" over Derksen's body. Allan conceded it was possible.

Allan also confirmed identification officers did not then wear the same protective clothing at crime scenes that they do now, such as boot coverings, coveralls and hairnets.


jellybean

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Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
« Reply #21 on: January 23, 2011, 11:36:38 AM »

A first-degree murder trial for a man accused in one of Manitoba's most notorious homicide cases began Monday in a Winnipeg courtroom.
Hearings begin on 26th anniversary of discovery of girl's body
Last Updated: Monday, January 17, 2011 | 7:04 AM CST
CBC News



Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/canada/manitoba/story/2011/01/16/man-trial-derksen-grant-day-one-advancer.html#ixzz1BsgZaKCQhttp://www.cbc.ca/canada/manitoba/story/2011/01/16/man-trial-derksen-grant-day-one-advancer.html#ixzz1Bsg8vRwM

debbiec

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Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
« Reply #22 on: January 24, 2011, 11:33:04 AM »
By DEAN PRITCHARD, QMI Agency

Last Updated: January 22, 2011 3:38am

 
Candace Derksen. WINNIPEG - Thirteen-year-old Candace Derksen may have remained alive up to 24 after she was tied up and abandoned in a freezing tool shed 27 years ago, but she likely didn't suffer any pain, a jury heard Friday.

"She lost consciousness pretty fast but it may have been hours before she died," said retired chief medical examiner Dr. Peter Markesteyn.

Markesteyn was testifying at the first-degree murder trial of Mark Grant.

Derksen disappeared while walking home from Mennonite Brethren Collegiate in Winnipeg on Nov. 30, 1984. Her frozen body was discovered Jan. 17, 1985, in a tool shed at Alsip's Industrial Products.

Her wrists and ankles had been tied behind her back.

Markesteyn said Derksen died of hypothermia as the result of exposure.

Even before losing consciousness, Derksen would not have suffered any pain, Markesteyn said.

"There is no pain because the pain receptors no longer function," he said. "That is a sign things are getting worse, not better."

Markesteyn said there were no signs Derksen had been sexually assaulted.

Swelling to her hands indicated Derksen was alive when she was tied up, Markesteyn said.

Derksen suffered "considerable injuries" to her knees, Markesteyn said.

"Her knees were the only site of injury," he said. "It would suggest she was on her knees in an environment that caused injury."

Red splotches on Derksen's hand were "very consistent with bite marks of mice," Markesteyn said. "They are definitely post-mortem."

Classmate David Wiebe was among the last people to see Derksen alive. Wiebe, then 15, met Derksen the previous summer at Bible camp.

"She was a fun, vibrant kid," Wiebe testified. "It was just fun being around her."

Wiebe said she and Derksen had a snowball fight at school the afternoon she disappeared. Wiebe said he would have walked her home, but he had a driver's ed class.

Within days, police were treating Wiebe like a suspect, court heard.

One officer "kept giving me a lot of hope, saying 'We are going to have Candace home before midnight,'" Wiebe said. "I said, 'How do you know that?' He said, 'Because you are going to get in the car and show me where she is.'"

In 2007, prior to Grant's arrest, police asked Wiebe to take a polygraph test.

"I said if I were the Derksens, I'd probably want people to be as co-operative as possible, so I said 'Yeah, I'll do it.'"

dean.pritchard@sunmedica.ca

A MOTHER'S ANGUISH

Excerpts from police statement of Wilma Derksen, taken Jan. 23, 1985

"I was home by 3:30 in the afternoon and just before 4 o'clock I received the phone call from Candace ... When we spoke on the phone Candace fi rst said 'Hi mom' and then she giggled. She told me Dave had just given her a face wash in the snow and she seemed happy. She asked me to pick her up at school ... I told Candace that I couldn't pick her up because I was having problems with the two younger children ... Shortly after that Candace phoned back and I asked her to walk home ... She defi nitely wasn't upset about not getting a ride ...

"I started cleaning up and (didn't) realize the time until about 4:40. I became concerned when Candace hadn't shown up as yet and I bundled up the two younger children ... We drove the route Candace takes home and ... were watching for Candace but didn't see her. We stopped at the school and I checked the doors to fi nd they were locked. I quickly picked up Cli_ and we backtracked Candace's normal route home again ...

"I was looking for David Wiebe, the boy who washed Candace's face. When I got to the school ... I introduced myself and asked him if he knew where Candace was. He said he didn't know and that he thought she went home ... I told him Candace wasn't home yet and he said that was terrible and he tried to comfort me because I was already starting to show emotion ...

"I think it was shortly before 7 o'clock after all my leads were exhausted that we phoned the police ... After that I stayed at home and prayed mostly ... Some time between 10 and 11 Cli_ went out for a walk. It was sort of a frantic search on his part by then."


http://www.torontosun.com/news/canada/2011/01/22/16990481.html

debbiec

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Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
« Reply #23 on: January 24, 2011, 11:33:59 AM »
By: Staff Writer

Posted: 01/24/2011 9:41 AM

Testimony is expected today from the owner of property where the 13-year-old Derksen's body found, and from more police officers involved in early stages of the investigation.

Mark Edwart Grant, 47, has pleaded not guilty to first-degree murder in Derksen's 1984 death.

Grant wasn't arrested until 2007 after DNA found at the crime scene was linked to him through advanced testing techniques.

Derksen was allegedly grabbed off the street on Nov. 30, 1984, bound with rope and left to freeze to death inside a shed. Her body was found on Jan. 17, 1985, following an exhaustive search that included hundreds of volunteers.


http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/breakingnews/Derksen-trial-continues-114484394.html
 

debbiec

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Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
« Reply #24 on: January 25, 2011, 10:15:34 AM »
Defence in sensational Winnipeg cold-case murder trial targets DNA evidence
 
 
By Mike McIntyre, Winnipeg Free Press January 25, 2011 5:29 AM


But the first-degree murder case against Mark Grant may prove to be anything but routine as his lawyers work to raise a doubt about the validity of the forensic evidence.

Grant, 47, has pleaded not guilty to the November 1984 slaying of 13-year-old Candace Derksen, who vanished while walking home from her school in the Winnipeg neighbourhood of Elmwood. Her frozen, hog-tied body was found in January 1985 inside a storage shed at a brickyard less than two kilometres away.

A clear pattern has been established through cross-examination of the 11 witnesses who have testified against Grant since the case began last week. Defence lawyer Saul Simmonds has made a concerted effort to attack the evidence which led to his client being arrested in 2007, citing a spoiled crime scene, sloppy police work and the erosion of memories through the passage of time.

Three pubic hairs linked to Grant were found on or near Derksen's body, although police have said she wasn't sexually assaulted. Four scalp hairs that appear to have been lightly bleached near the roots were on Derksen's clothing. As well, DNA linked to Grant was found on the twine used to bind her.

On Monday, Simmonds asked a flurry of questions of witnesses which themselves raised a number of questions, including the possibility Grant once worked at the business where Derksen's body was found.

Frank Alsip, the owner of Alsip's Building Products and Services Ltd., testified he has no memory of ever employing Grant but admitted personnel records have long since been destroyed. Alsip said "it's possible" Grant could have spent some time on the property, which could explain why strands of his hair were found inside the shed near Derksen's body.

Alsip also told jurors under cross-examination that the City of Winnipeg was storing hundreds of sandbags on his property, all bound with twine. Alsip said he has no idea who might have had access to the bags and twine, which is similar to what was used to confine Derksen.

Alsip said his property wasn't fully fenced in, didn't have surveillance cameras and often saw unwelcome visitors walking through. He said the shed where Derksen was found had an insecure door that had broken off its hinges years earlier but was never repaired.

"Unfortunately people were free to come and go as they chose, weren't they?" said Simmonds.

The same line of questioning was put to several police officers who attended the scene. Every Crown witness to date has had no memory of a previous meeting with Grant, which would seem to rule out the possibility of an inadvertent transfer of DNA evidence. But defence lawyers appear to be leaving that door open by asking specific questions of officers about whether they can recall every person they encountered, meal they ate at and movie they watched in the weeks preceding the investigation. None could, of course.

Last week, retired officer Ronald Allan admitted the crime scene could have been "contaminated" because investigators had no way of knowing at the time of scientific advances that were to come, allowing for forensic testing that would lead them to Grant more than two decades later.

Several officers walked through the shed and surrounding area, not wearing any protective clothing, masks or hair nets, as they collected about 40 exhibits, Allan told jurors. He couldn't say how many different sets of hands touched the twine from which Grant's DNA was ultimately extracted using advanced scientific techniques.

Simmonds asked Allan whether officers at the scene that day could have "coughed, sneezed ... scratched themselves" while searching for evidence.

Allan said it was possible, but the passage of time means there is no way to precisely remember.

The trial is set to continue on Wednesday afternoon.

mike.mcintyrefreepress@mb.ca


Read more: http://www.globalwinnipeg.com/world/Defence+sensational+Winnipeg+cold+case+murder+trial+targets+evidence/4162036/story.html#ixzz1C3zhQCys

Chris

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Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
« Reply #25 on: January 26, 2011, 12:42:52 AM »
How can pubic hairs end up contaminating something? Did he have a habit of pulling out his # in weird places?

debbiec

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Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
« Reply #27 on: January 31, 2011, 12:44:10 PM »
By: Bruce Owen

Posted: 01/31/2011 11:49 AM

WINNIPEG - Free Press reporter Bruce Owen is reporting live from the the Candace Derksen murder trial Monday as the jury hears more testimony about how DNA evidence can be inadvertently contaminated by police.

The focus is on twine recovered by police from a shed where Derksen was found dead in January 1985. The 13-year-old had been tied up and froze to death after vanishing on her way home from school several weeks earlier.

Mark Grant, 47, has pleaded not guilty to first-degree murder.

Court heard this morning from RCMP employee Tod Christianson. In early 2001 he worked at the RCMP lab in Winnipeg, and processed twine for DNA testing by an RCMP lab in Ottawa.

He said he cut the twine up and sealed it in seven large-scale extraction tubes.

Under cross-exam by Grant's lawyer Saul Simmonds, Christianson said it was possible the twine and other seized items like gum could be contaminated by someone else's DNA.

However, he said incidental contamination can be detected in the lab, and separated from a DNA profile of someone who had major contact with an item being tested, like a firearm.


Grant's trial continues through the week.

Candace Derksen, 13, vanished while walking home from school Nov. 30, 1984. Her frozen, hog-tied body was found Jan. 17, 1985 inside a storage shed at a brickyard less than two kilometres away.

The case is largely built around material found at the crime scene, specifically seven hairs and a 14-foot long piece of twine, which ultimately led police to Grant in 2007 due to advances in forensic science.

To follow Bruce Owen's live coverage, join the Cover It Live event below.

bruce.owen@freepress.mb.ca


http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/breakingnews/Derksen-trial-hears-testimony-about-DNA-evidence-114942944.html

debbiec

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Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
« Reply #28 on: February 02, 2011, 11:35:21 AM »
By: Bruce Owen

Posted: 02/2/2011 1:00 AM

Each on their own perhaps wouldn't have meant that much, but taken together they helped city police zero in on a suspect in the 1984 disappearance and slaying of 13-year-old Candace Derksen, the jury in Mark Grant's murder trial heard Tuesday.

Sgt. Jon Lutz testified that on Nov. 23, 2006 -- almost 22 years after Derksen vanished -- he sent seven hairs found in the wooden shed where she died to a private lab in Thunder Bay, Ont.

The lab specialized in mitochondrial DNA testing; meaning it could develop a DNA profile from hair, he said. The RCMP crime lab at the time didn't do this kind of specialized testing.

Under questioning from Crown attorney Brian Bell, Lutz told court the hairs were recovered from Derksen's jacket, kangaroo sweater, right sock and on a stump that was inside the shed.

"I thought it was kind of strange that they were all over the place," Lutz told the five-woman, seven-man jury.

The results of that analysis narrowed the police service's reopened investigation of the Derksen case, said Lutz, a former member of the police service's cold case unit.

Officers also looked at convicted killer Stanley Pomfret as a possible suspect, Lutz added. Pomfret killed Tena Franks and raped two other girls in the early 1990s, but he was ruled out as a suspect in the Derksen case. He provided a DNA sample to police in the cold case investigation.

Police also sent Grant's hair sample for testing in early January 2007, and got a result about two weeks later. It was not explained in court why police had Grant's hair on file.

"We decided we needed to start a short-term task force," Lutz said, adding Grant was the target.

Grant, 47, has pleaded not guilty to first-degree murder in Derksen's death. Derksen vanished while walking home from school Nov. 30, 1984. Her frozen body was found Jan. 17, 1985 inside the shed located at a brickyard less than two kilometres away. She had been tied up and apparently left to freeze to death.

The investigation of Grant also included police setting up a special surveillance unit in order to obtain a "discarded DNA sample," Lutz said.

Besides the hair, other items were also sent for forensic testing, including twine and a chip bag found in the shed.

Court will hear more testimony about the police investigation and the DNA evidence over the next week.

bruce.owen@freepress.mb.ca


Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition February 2, 2011 B3

http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/hairs-helped-guide-police-to-suspect-in-killing-115086759.html