Author Topic: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario  (Read 24131 times)

RubyRose

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Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
« Reply #15 on: October 26, 2016, 01:08:02 PM »
Thank you for posting the article, Have Faith.  Quite the eye-opener.  Makes you wonder just how many more of these (not in this particular case, perhaps, although there could be more) types and causes of death may have gone undetected in other institutions. It would probably be easy enough to accomplish.

Sap1

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Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
« Reply #16 on: October 26, 2016, 02:04:45 PM »
Thanks Ron. At least she was admitting her crimes to the counselors at addictions; thank God for that. She also worked with developmentally delayed and children which could include terminally ill or other painful conditions. Investigators have their work cut out for them.

That poetry is just disgustingly dark and morbid for lack of better words. She went from one extreme to another ... light and humorous to very dark places in her mind.

She must have known that counselors cannot keep client confidentiality in cases of abuse, murder, or threats of murder as she took various courses in college on counseling. Even non-professionals know that.

jellybean

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Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
« Reply #17 on: October 26, 2016, 03:24:09 PM »
It is all coming out now.  Her sickness being exposed for everyone to see.  We also know that her drink of choice is rye. I also suspect that she "finished off two of her cats".

How very lonely, isolated, and extremely ill she is. I have a feeling that she wanted to be caught. As a christian she wanted to stop, but could not - unless others forced her to stop.

I have a feeling that she was so tortured, that she had to confess - and she did, thankfully, to a counselor on Addiction.

I saw on television a young man, a neighbour, who said that his neighbour must have been expecting it, as she recently found a home for her dog.

So, she was prepared - and was not surprised when she was arrested. imo

Her defense may be mental illness, but we will see.
Other serial killers did not have that benefit of defense.
I think that her rehab attempts might come into play in this case.
On the other hand, she knew right from wrong, so that type of defense may not fly

This must be causing great anxiety in families who are  considering sending their loved ones into nursing homes.  Something must change, and fast!!.

jb

« Last Edit: October 26, 2016, 03:37:03 PM by jellybean »

Sap1

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Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
« Reply #18 on: October 26, 2016, 07:30:55 PM »
So it may be insulin she used on the patients.

She knew she would be apprehended. I concur with Jellybean and I do believe she wanted her bizarre dark streak to end.

More from that article:

Quote
Wettlaufer, 49, entered into the peace bond almost three weeks earlier, on Oct. 6.

She signed it after staff at Toronto's Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) alerted Toronto police in September about information provided by the former nurse about the deaths of the patients, as CBC News learned from a source with knowledge of the investigation on Wednesday.

CAMH won't comment on revelations

Under the provincial Coroners Act, there are a number of scenarios in which every citizen must notify a coroner or police of the facts they know surrounding a death. These scenarios include when a death has occurred as a result of violence, misadventure, negligence, misconduct or malpractice, according to the legislation.

It's unclear who at CAMH first contacted police. A spokesman for CAMH declined to comment early Wednesday afternoon.

"To protect the personal health information of our patients, CAMH does not disclose the names of its clients. Nor does CAMH comment on any ongoing police investigations," spokesman Sean O'Malley told CBC News.

jellybean

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Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
« Reply #19 on: October 26, 2016, 08:15:23 PM »
Quote
police in Woodstock, Ont., were concerned that Elizabeth Tracey Mae Wettlaufer would commit a "serious personal injury"

What is meant by that?  She might commit suicide - or serious personal injury to others?

I think they meant to "others", because if it was to herself, she would have been committed.

Thoughts on this....?

jb

Have faith

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Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
« Reply #20 on: October 26, 2016, 09:48:51 PM »
Quote
police in Woodstock, Ont., were concerned that Elizabeth Tracey Mae Wettlaufer would commit a "serious personal injury"

What is meant by that?  She might commit suicide - or serious personal injury to others?

I think they meant to "others", because if it was to herself, she would have been committed.

Thoughts on this....?

jb



Since LE took out a peace bond on her at that time, barring her from nursing homes etc., I think the concern was for other people.

Sap1

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Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
« Reply #21 on: October 27, 2016, 09:21:11 AM »
Quote
Family members of several victims said police investigators informed them that the Some family members have described their loved ones falling into a sudden coma before dying.

Shaking my head! Clashing of personalities can happen in any setting, so seniors may not have been the only victims? My heart goes out to all those patients and families who have been victims of this nurse. she has no excuses for her behavior and as someone else mentioned, she knew right from wrong. First degree murder is appropriate, imo.

jellybean

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Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
« Reply #22 on: October 27, 2016, 11:04:29 AM »
Quote

Quote
I wonder if she,  in a sick way,  felt that she was doing them a service by taking them out of their misery- (as she perceived it to be) or if she perceived these seniors as complainers and trouble makers, and created too much work?

Close enough.  It had to be one of the two.

The poor seniors remaining in these homes. I can't begin to think how terrified they must be, when a nurse approaches them for treatment.

As to other positions, I wonder if she was asked to leave  due to her drinking?

jb


« Last Edit: October 27, 2016, 03:33:39 PM by jellybean »

jellybean

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Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
« Reply #23 on: October 27, 2016, 03:31:11 PM »

Ron

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Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
« Reply #24 on: October 27, 2016, 05:53:43 PM »
Senior abuse is not limited to nursing homes. I t is time for tougher laws to protect vulnerable seniors.


http://www.theifp.ca/news-story/6933245-georgetown-man-charged-after-senior-found-in-deplorable-conditions-/www.haltoncrimestoppers.com, or by texting "Tip201" with your message to 274637 (crimes).

 

jellybean

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Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
« Reply #25 on: October 28, 2016, 12:15:22 PM »
Quoted from article in post #31

Quote

This is often true.  They are asked to leave quietly. Facilities keep things quiet to better serve their reputation. As she moves on to another facility - it becomes their problem - no longer theirs.

The same applies, to teachers,priests, doctors - the list goes on.


jb



« Last Edit: October 28, 2016, 12:22:12 PM by jellybean »

jobo

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Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
« Reply #26 on: October 28, 2016, 03:21:40 PM »
Have to agree with you, jellybean.
As far as I can see....Carresant care needs to be charged for not following protocol. 
Med errors and Med counts should be taken seriously. They should have been documented and followed up...not that hard to do.
Whoever was in charge of that should lose their job as they're incompetent.




Sap1

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Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
« Reply #27 on: October 28, 2016, 04:05:48 PM »
ITA Jobo! And I agree with Jellybean's reply as well. I've seen it happen myself and I did report to a superior regarding a new employee where I was working at the time. Then drug errors began happening on her shift almost immediately. Initially I felt badly b/c I felt I was gossiping but my intuition was true. I hadn't seen her in 15 years but she didn't last long at her new employment. Drug errors can happen easily but when it's the same person each time, something needs doing. At our University of Alberta hospital ... after one drug error, the staffer gets an hour long questioning and has to do a complete calculation test. I agree with that.

jellybean

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Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
« Reply #28 on: October 28, 2016, 05:52:25 PM »
It is very difficult to call a person out....there is alot of angst that goes with it - but is usually the right step to take, especially in a hospital setting.
Nurses for the most part have high ethics, imo, thank heavens.

I have questions:  Supposing a patient is on pain medication, and refuses to take it.
The paper work would have already been done, ie - properly checked out.
Then, what does a nurse do?  I think that this is where a hole in the system might exist.

Nurse could take it themselves...

When a patient requires more painkillers than prescribed - can a nurse give them the extra pill, and check it out properly with the reason why?
Or would she have to obtain approval at all times?
Are nurses given some latitude at such times?

Thanks

jb
« Last Edit: October 28, 2016, 08:44:09 PM by jellybean »

Sap1

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Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
« Reply #29 on: October 29, 2016, 12:30:14 AM »
Quote
Supposing a patient is on pain medication, and refuses to take it.
The paper work would have already been done, ie - properly checked out.
Then, what does a nurse do?  I think that this is where a hole in the system might exist.

Then it is taken back to the medication room and double checked (and wasted) or it can be disposed of in the patients room where there is a receptacle that cannot be accessed by any other patient ... as long as the nurse has a witness to sign for a wastage. Most prefer to waste it in the medication room.

Quote
Nurse could take it themselves...

Yes, there is room for that if one is unscrupulous. However they risk the chance of getting caught if the patient decides later that they want the medication. Whomever they ask for the pain medication would check on the patients medication list on the Computer and would see that it was given and tell the patient, "you already were given the medication" and if the patient was not confused, would claim they refused it before. The nurse would then be approached to make sure she either gave it or wasted it before and failed to record it on the patient med list on the computer. 

Quote
When a patient requires more painkillers than prescribed - can a nurse give them the extra pill, and check it out properly with the reason why?

No. There has to be a Doctor or Resident Doctor to assess the patient first as to why more analgesic is necessary or if there could be other issues happening.

Quote
Or would she have to obtain approval at all times?

Absolutely.

Quote
Are nurses given some latitude at such times?

There are certain things nurses have more latitude for in ICU's, ER's, however still under the guidance of Doctors usual routines in those cases.
Only Nurse Practitioners are allowed to prescribe or change medications, other than Doctors.