Author Topic: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario  (Read 24872 times)

Ron

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jellybean

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Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
« Reply #61 on: January 27, 2017, 01:59:53 PM »
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This is good news - A little too late.
And how about this one?
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Two of the four charges of attempted murder the 49-year-old former nurses faces also involved residents at the same home, as well as two charges of aggravated assault against two elderly sisters.

Aggravated assault?   Where were the other staff members when these assaults took place??

I think this home should be placed on the chopping block.  Revoke their license, and the head honcho's of this facility should be charged  with negligence, lack of over-sight and absence of due diligence of protection and care.

JB

JB



jellybean

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Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
« Reply #62 on: January 28, 2017, 04:17:24 PM »
Fire all of them... keep the bldg, and restaff it.

If possible.  Have a weekly inspector go in, over  a 12 month period.
That should clear it up.
Anything is possible, if the Province wants to put it's back to it.
This would send a clear message to other Senior Care Homes.
Sloppy reporting and looking the other way - might be found in other Senior Homes, I suspect.


JB

Sap1

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Long article with much repetition, video, and twitter comments, so following is an excerpt.


http://globalnews.ca/news/3494882/elizabeth-wettlaufer-court/A former Ontario nurse angry with her career and personal life believed she was an instrument of God as she used insulin to kill vulnerable seniors in her care over the course of nearly a decade.

About seven months after her arrest last fall, Elizabeth Wettlaufer pleaded guilty Thursday to eight counts of first-degree murder, four counts of attempted murder and two counts of aggravated assault.



Have faith

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The following is truly shocking information. These people should be charged as "accessories after the fact"  to murder! She could have been stopped if they had reported her her to police.

"Over the years, she told at least 11 people what she was up to, including her pastor, who prayed with her and told her if she did it again he would report her, and a lawyer who told her to remain silent."

http://www.lfpress.com/2017/06/01/elizabeth-wettlaufer-the-woodstock-woman-entered-guilty-pleas-monday-to-murder-and-attempted-murder-charges-against-seniors-in-her-care

jellybean

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This woman is very sick - the pastor is delusioned and should be brought before the courts and made to repeat his advice given to her before the public for all to hear.  and the lawyer to whom she confessed should be brought before the courts.
I believe that confidentiality does not apply when it comes to murder. Be it man of the cloth, or lawyer.

Seems to me her confessions were set aside, with the judgement being - oh well, they were elderly and did not have much to live for. It might have been different were it a child or a healthy person.

She was confessing all over the place, thus wanted to be stopped.  Shame on those who heard her out, and did not take any action.

I view these people as enablers and accessories to murder.

jb

RubyRose

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I agree, jellybean.  I was shaking my head when I first heard that.  Perhaps they didn't take her seriously.  That's no excuse but it's the only feeble explanation I can come up with.

I also agree that she is very sick and I too think she was confessing to these people hoping to be stopped.

Cold comfort, I know, to the survivors of her victims.

Sap1

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I was under the impression that when a perp confesses to a minister/priest, that the clergy person has an obligation to report confessions of murder.

A lot of people to blame here.

2soccermom

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yes, I think that's right, SAP.  I don't know about "pastor"-individual relations, but for the Catholic church (with which I'm more familiar) the sacrament of confession is considered sacred and unbreakable, and priests can be de-frocked (!) for sharing information gleaned in the confessional, regardless of the import. This, I believe, includes statements on intention to commit harm or disclosures of harm -- which is fundamentally abhorrent to me. I hope someone will correct me on this :)
But my understanding is that Canadian *law*, on the other hand, places the burden of disclosure on clergy, lawyers, clinicians and any others IF there is risk of imminent harm to others. While these relationships carry recognition of their special nature (as in patient or client confidentiality), that special recognition upends if one has knowledge of potentional risk to others. I believe there have been some fraught and contentious interpretations of the law in past, but this is my inexpert understanding of the current state of law here. Which suggests some lapse in the law that Catholic doctrine (if I have it right; and, regardless, Catholic dogma is not specifically relevant to NWs case) has not yet been consitutionally challenged.
Yes, I agree that both the pastor and lawyer here have committed at least moral crimes and quite probably legal ones.

jellybean

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I don't see how the lawyer and the clergy could sleep peacefully at night, after speaking with this woman, never knowing for certain that she would take their advice and stop future killings.
Did they brush her off as a professional confessor to crimes that were never committed?
A seeker of attention?

How could they take the risk?  Not to mention her confessions of past killings.
If the man of cloth was a priest, then the priest is placed in a tough position.

They must keep secrecy, regardless - or risk excommunication.
see link.

http://canonlawmadeeasy.com/2008/12/04/can-a-priest-ever-reveal-what-is-said-in-confession/

jb


« Last Edit: June 10, 2017, 02:47:55 PM by jellybean »

RubyRose

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I'm not particularly religious so probably have no right to comment on something so serious but I think i'd take my chances on excommunication rather than think I might have assisted in part to someone's untimely death.

I suppose the lawyer could always claim Lawyer/Client confidentiality but I'm not sure in law how that might apply to crimes which may be committed in the future as opposed to crimes which have already been committed.

Whatever the reasons, both did make serious errors in judgement and should probably not be practicing in their present professions in any case.

Sap1

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8 concurrent sentences. No eligibility for parole for 25 years and the judge said likely never. All she could do was mumble a feeble "sorry" but knew it wasn't enough. These family members went through grieving twice. Some came down with mental health issues and lost their jobs. So very many people so harshly affected. So very tragic!

  http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/london/killer-nurse-wettlaufer-sentencing-1.4175164

capeheart

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I think she should have gotten 25 years for each life she took, consecutive years, just in case someone else thinks they are playing God. She had a family, a son and all those people were cared for by an evil person who took control of their lives and ended them. She premeditated these murders and it is as cruel as anyone could think of.  I couldn't forgive her if she had done that to someone belonged to me. My mom was in a home for the elderly, she wasn't in bed all the time, she was quite able to tell what was going on around her. She would have had the mind to tell us if anything unusual was going on. She was 92 when she passed away. This woman thankfully was caught, but way too late, too many died at her hands.  :o :o :o :o :o :o

Sap1

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I thought so too Cape, ... 25 each heinous murder. She stated in police interviews that killing a senior relived her stresses and with so many other factors known now, I really doubt she will even get parole in 25 years if she applies.
She is so very very "off" mentally that I have the gut feeling she can not cope with her demons in a small cell and may eventually take her own life. Just imo.

My thoughts and prayers are for the families of the victims. :(

Here is another insight about her from a prospective love interest. She showed some strong anti social behavior for a long period but I suppose it doesn't always point to murder although she had already murdered two seniors by this time.

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2017/06/01/i-think-i-dated-a-serial-killer-saskatchewan-woman-dated-serial-senior-killer_n_16916110.html