Author Topic: The life and death of Colten Boushie  (Read 7845 times)

Sap1

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Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #90 on: February 18, 2018, 11:07:47 PM »
Yet no charges for the 4 individuals for their part in the whole scene. Their broken and loaded rifle was sitting loose in the car being driven by a drunk person.

CBC is covered 80% by taxpayers and 20% from advertising. Andrew Scheer said he would get rid of CBC. Well they are doing a good job on the winter games though.

I contacted Rosemary Barton regarding the other side of the coin but have heard nothing and likely never will so I will contact her again and apologize for sending info that does not sit well with biased reporting. 

« Last Edit: February 18, 2018, 11:11:36 PM by Sap1 »

Sap1

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Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #91 on: February 19, 2018, 12:02:55 AM »
Sort of good news, if it works.

https://regina.ctvnews.ca/new-team-to-fight-crime-in-rural-saskatchewan-1.3556453



The province has announced the creation of a new Protection and Response Team to help fight crime in rural Saskatchewan.

The team will consist of 258 armed officers with arrest and detention powers, including:

120 police officers from RCMP and municipal police services
60 police positions currently deployed to the Combined Traffic Services Saskatchewan Initiative
30 new police positions and 30 repurposed police positions currently funded by the Ministry of Justice

In addition, 40 highway commercial vehicle enforcement officers will be armed and, along with conservation officers who already carry guns, will be able to respond to calls and make arrests.


That means conservation officers could be called to break and enters if they were closer to the scene than the RCMP.

"They also deal with people that have firearms, more often than not, and have very similar training," said Dale McPhee, deputy minister of Corrections and policing.

"What we're trying to do is, we're going to sit down and make sure that standard response training is the same so we can get a first car there. Police officers ... actually don't necessarily run into those environments, what they do is they assess the situation based on their training, just as (conservation officers) would taking a firearms call with somebody in the bush."

According to a government news release, all team members will receive a comprehensive training curriculum, which will be provided to all officers regardless of their designations. The team expands on the successes of blended policing models to:

Improve police response to emergency calls for services, including property crimes that are in progress
Enhance uniform visibility and presence in rural Saskatchewan
Increase the enforcement of drug trafficking on Saskatchewan?s roadways
 Enhance the safety of Saskatchewan roads by reducing the number of serious collisions and fatalities
The team is being created in response to recommendations by the Caucus Committee on Crime.

People around Saskatchewan were voicing concerns after a story emerged last September that three masked suspects armed with handguns allegedly approached a farmhand in west-central Saskatchewan.

Shortly after, there were media reports of farmers carrying firearms during harvest. RCMP then urged people not to take the law into their own hands.

The committee's report, which was also released Tuesday, said there were concerns about police in every region of the province.

"Citizens did not feel as if the RCMP were visible enough in their community to deter crime and that, in some cases, their slow response times allowed the criminal to get away," the report stated.

The report said rural residents are responding to growing crimes rates "by defending themselves in any way they feel necessary."

"This has led to rural residents carrying firearms in some cases, using their vehicles to push perpetrator's vehicles out of their yards, and have led to an increase in tensions between rural residents, surrounding First Nations, and police," it stated.

Justice Minister Gordon Wyant said the government would help people crime-proof their properties, perhaps through technology such as cameras.

Rebuilding a rural crime watch program would help too, he said.

"It was a while ago, you know, farms were a lot smaller than they are today and neighbours could keep an eye on their neighbours, and that's not the case anymore. Farms are much larger and neighbours don't have an opportunity to do that," said Wyant.

"So, what solutions can be brought to that, how can we enable the revitalization of a crime-watch program in areas and municipalities that want that?"

Ray Orb, president of the Saskatchewan Association of Rural Municipalities, said the measures announced Tuesday were a beginning.

"We wanted, for sure, to have more RCMP officers on the ground. We wanted to have a greater visibility of officers in the province in the rural areas," Orb said after the announcement.

"So I think what we've been promised today, we're not necessarily getting more officers, but we're getting more visibility. We're getting shorter response times, which I think is something that we really need in rural Saskatchewan."

Drug and alcohol use were cited as factors contributing to the growing crime rates. For example, Regina police told the committee that incidences of crystal meth increased 1,325 per cent from 2012 to 2016.

The committee also heard concerns that the federal Youth Criminal Justice Act was not stopping youth from committing crimes.

"In some cases, family, friends, and gangs were encouraging youth to commit crimes on their behalf because they knew that the youth would not suffer as severe repercussions if caught," said the report.

Wyant said Saskatchewan will request a review of the act with the aim of increased consequences for young offenders and adults who enable young people to commit crimes, and for greater rehabilitation.

Saskatchewan will also push for a western Canada Aboriginal gang strategy when justice ministers from across Canada meet next month, he said.

With files from The Canadian Press

jellybean

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Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #92 on: February 19, 2018, 12:48:33 AM »
sap
Quote
I contacted Rosemary Barton regarding the other side of the coin but have heard nothing and likely never will so I will contact her again and apologize for sending info that does not sit well with biased reporting.
.  LOL

I have noted their change in format and presentation.  Trying to jazz it up, I see' although it is  - pretty hard to jazz up boring Canadian news zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz, but this reminds me how lucky we are. Boring news is very often good news in these troubled times.

I certainly have noticed that CBC have become biased in what and how they present the news, as of late. 

jb
 
« Last Edit: February 19, 2018, 01:06:11 AM by jellybean »

Sap1

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Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #93 on: February 21, 2018, 02:58:00 PM »
On the other hand .....

White on Indigenous crimes in Saskatchewan. (Excerpts from long article.) I'm sorry, so much is relevant imo and I could not cut all that much. Please take the time to read at the link though. The author wrote this after the latest shooting.

http://leaderpost.com/news/crime/court-of-contention-a-look-back-at-crimes-that-divided-a-province

Hundreds of cases pass through Saskatchewan?s courts every day without commentary and with few observers. Then there?s a crime or trial that divides along lines of race and class, of advantage and marginalization, and tensions that simmer softly for years below the surface boil and erupt.

They spark protests, rallies, vigils, petitions and demands for inquiries. They ignite debate on the Internet, call-in shows, letters to the editor, and on the courthouse steps, fuelling local and national newscasts and headlines, academic studies, documentaries and books.

University of Regina professor James McNinch spoke of one such case at a public lecture in 2007.

?It was like I was seeing my home province in a new way,? he told the gathering. ?It seemed like the face of Saskatchewan was being revealed in a new way, because we have such a homesteader, howdy, Roughrider kind of image.

?And yet this was sort of the dark side coming out,? he said.

The case on which McNinch focused began in 2001 with a then 12-year-old girl in small-town Saskatchewan. Eight years later, she was a young woman standing with supporters, pressing for an inquiry, in front of the Saskatchewan Legislative Building. ?This isn?t easy for me but I believe in the importance for myself and for other First Nation children,? she told reporters.

(There were many supporters at the Legislative Building that day, but where were they when the 12 year old ran away?)Sap1

The girl, whose name is protected by a court-ordered publication ban, was the victim in a sexual assault case that unfolded and unravelled in the Saskatchewan courts for seven gruelling years, through four separate trials and three different appeals that, as on that day in 2009, often spawned rallies and controversy at each step.

Three white men from the Tisdale area met the 12-year-old, who had run away from home that night, as she sat on the steps of a bar in Chelan in September 2001. Testifying a half-dozen times, she accused the trio of getting her drunk and taking advantage of her sexually on a country road after she accepted a ride home. In a case that hinged on issues of consent, the girl agreed she had lied about her age ? then the legal age of consent was 14 ? but denied she was a willing participant in any sexual activity. After all the trials and appeals that reached up to the Supreme Court, only Dean Trevor Edmondson was convicted, receiving a house arrest sentence that further enflamed emotions. ?Race relations are taking a beating ?  Saskatchewan gets another black eye and redneck image,? wrote Indigenous columnist Doug Cuthand at the time.

(That is so wrong imo. These men got a slap on the wrist for a crime on a child!! I can understand the outrage of the victim's people. But I continue to ask, why was a 12 year old running away from home and sitting on the steps of an alcohol drinking establishment?) Sap1


A July 2003 rally outside the Court of Queens Bench in Melfort regarding a sexual assault on a 12-year-old Indigenous girl. GABRIEL HENNINGS / SASKATOON STARPHOENIX

Just two months before the girl and the men crossed paths, an acquittal in a different case prompted a grieving mother to tell a Regina news conference she felt as though, ?It sets a precedent for a Caucasian person to come in ? and kill an aboriginal. And it?s OK.?

(Details are fuzzy, but reading the whole article, this does seem to be a huge problem.)Sap1


An altercation that began with some smashed vehicle windows on March 19, 2000 at a resort near Carlyle escalated to a group of partygoers confronting the two vandals. One witness heard racial slurs shouted by a group of white men as they charged up a hill toward the victim and his cousin. William Kakakaway, a 22-year-old member of the White Bear First Nation, died when he was hit in the head with a tire iron, hurled from some four to six metres away. The man who had thrown it said he was defending himself from an assailant brandishing a bat. The jury at the trial in Estevan acquitted him of murder. While a band councillor denounced a ?racist climate? in the area, the man?s lawyer denied race played any role in the confrontation but agreed it did in the fallout immediately after the death. As tensions rose, a white teen threatened Kakakaway?s family, an Indigenous man vandalized police vehicles, and threatening posters appeared in the area.

(Shocking at best) Sap1

Several years earlier, what McNinch called the ?dark side? of this province was sharply brought into focus by the image of an angry Carney Nerland, sporting a brown shirt with a swastika-emblazoned armband as he pointed a gun and spewed about ?native birth control.? The pictures of Nerland, a member of the Saskatchewan branch of an Aryan Nation group, were captured as he attended a neo-Nazi gathering in Alberta, four months before he killed Leo LaChance in Prince Albert.

(I had not even heard of this before! More than shocking! Have people not learned from the WW2??!!) Sap1

On Jan. 28, 1991, Nerland was drinking with two friends, who worked in provincial corrections, inside the pawn shop he owned when LaChance, a 43-year-old trapper from the Big River First Nations, entered. Nerland fired an assault rifle twice into the floor, then, after LaChance exited, fired again through the shop door. The Cree man, who was on the other side of that door, was hit in the back. As he lay dying,  LaChance told an officer who arrived on scene that there?d been no argument, and the victim surmised the shooting must have been an accident.
Nerland ? who while awaiting his day in court said he deserved a medal and had ?done you all a favour? for killing the First Nations man ? pleaded guilty as charged to manslaughter and received a four-year prison sentence. The Crown said there was insufficient evidence to prove an intention to kill, necessary for a murder charge. But many Indigenous leaders deemed it an obvious hate crime, demanding an inquiry. The controversy deepened when it became apparent in the midst of the inquiry that Nerland was likely an RCMP informant.


(I have no words! Totally shocked to the core! This Nazi leaning is what brought my own parents to Canada and away from the country it began in. Unfortunately there is more Naziism here in Canada than in Europe.) Sap1


In 1992, the same year the province appointed Hughes to lead the inquiry probing the handling of the Nerland case, two other homicides in the southern half of the province again brought racial tensions to the fore. This time, the victims were white, and their killers Indigenous. Dubbed the Good Samaritan cases at the time, they began on Aug. 15, 1992 when William Dove, 73, left his cottage at Round Lake to go help two young men and a teen from nearby Sakimay First Nation with flat tires on their car. He was beaten to death by David Myles Acoose, Corey Acoose, and a 16-year-old, who stole his vehicle and torched it. They pleaded guilty to manslaughter.

Later that same year, John Sorgenson, like Dove, had been asked to lend a hand to those with car trouble, and ended up dying in what the province?s highest court called a ?cold-blooded pitiless slaying.? The 41-year-old was attacked by five drunk men and teens, his body found near his burned-out truck in the Kamsack area on Sept. 4, 1992. All five accused were convicted of murder at three separate jury trials.

Four years after the deaths of the two farmers, an 88-year-old, Alvena-area farmer, who was white, shot and killed Leonard Paul John, 33, from the nearby One Arrow First Nation, north of Saskatoon, during a confrontation on the farm after a break-in. Finding the shooter acted in self-defence and no likelihood of conviction, the Justice Department opted against charges ? a decision which drew a swift response from the then-chief of the Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nations. ?If the roles were reversed ? would anybody believe that the Crown would not prosecute?? Blaine Favel told the StarPhoenix.


For some, manslaughter convictions in the Dove case became the counterpoint to critics three years later in a case reversing those roles, with an Indigenous victim and white accused. Pamela George, a low-income, single mother was killed by two middle-class, university students. Steven Kummerfield and Alexander Ternowetsky, then 20 and 19, had picked up George, who on occasion worked in the sex trade in downtown Regina. One of the pair had hidden in the trunk of the vehicle after finding another sex trade worker reluctant to get into a vehicle with the two, drunken men. The body of 28-year-old George was found on April 18, 1995 in a field near the Regina Airport. There were differing opinions by pathologists called by the Crown and defence as to whether or not she had died from exposure to the elements after being beaten and abandoned on the outskirts of the city or as a result of injuries sustained in the beating. Testimony by witnesses was peppered with allegations the men had used racist terms in later describing what had occurred to friends and in insults made when the first women wouldn?t get in their car. Their convictions for manslaughter attracted demonstrations on the steps of the courthouse and condemnation from activist groups representing women as well as the Indigenous community.

The day of the sentencing drew some 300 people to a rally at the Regina courthouse, where an irate Sakimay First Nation Chief Lindsay Kaye said, ?There is two justice systems: one justice system for the white; one justice system for the Indian people. It?s all right for a white person to kill an Indian person.? Protests followed in cities across the country.

In a pre-social media era, the Leader-Post was inundated by an unprecedented number of letters to the editor, including those from women, both Indigenous and non, decrying the outcome.


Nine months later, allegations of racism rang out in the same Regina courtroom when a jury convicted two men of murdering Fotios Frank Barlas. The battered body of the 26-year-old owner of an Indian Head restaurant was found July 4, 1996, on the Little Black Bear First Nation, from which cousins Lyle and Wayne Bellegarde hailed. As some in the white community had pointed to the Dove case in response to the outcry over the Kummerfield-Ternowetsky case, those from the Indigenous community pointed to the case of the white men in condemning the murder verdicts and life sentence for the two Indigenous men. (A third accused, also Indigenous, was acquitted.) Bellegarde supporters blamed racism, shouting in the courtroom, ?even before the trial started, you had them guilty.?

Whether some or all of the offences were racially motivated or not ? each instance turning on unique and nuanced facts and law far more detailed than the above summaries, and perceptions and mindset that reach deeper than court transcripts ? they unequivocally became racially charged. And the effects linger in distrust and suspicion within and between communities and peoples, the pressure left to build toward the next time.

After a senseless, triple murder at the start of this new millenium claimed both Indigenous and non-Indigenous lives at the hands of an enraged teen on a Fort Qu?Appelle-area First Nation, Leader-Post columnist Murray Mandryk noted:

?There?s something even worse than the province?s racial divisions that such cases bring out. It?s the fact we?ve seldom been able to learn anything from this racial rancour.

?Under such circumstances, we seldom listen to each other,? he wrote in a column nearly two decades before Wall?s tweets calling on Saskatchewan people to rise above intolerance.

?Maybe the latest tragedies can be different,? wrote Mandryk after that deadly rampage in 2001.

?Perhaps if we listen to some very legitimate concerns being raised by both communities, something positive can come from this.?

Barb Pacholik is the Leader-Post?s city co-ordinator and a columnist.

bpacholik@postmedia.com

« Last Edit: February 21, 2018, 11:16:03 PM by Sap1 »

Sap1

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Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #94 on: February 21, 2018, 11:27:53 PM »
There is more to the Stanley case than just the fact that Martel Popescul chose himself as the Judge. Popescul and the white supremacist Nerland knew each other years before. Popescul wants to stop an inquiry in the death of Leo Lachance who was shot in the back by Nerland who claimed it was accidental. A person stopping to help Lachance was not allowed to use Nerland's phone to call for help.

http://www.windspeaker.com/news/windspeaker-news/rcmp-cant-stop-nerland-inquiry/

jellybean

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Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #95 on: February 22, 2018, 02:13:28 PM »
Full transcript of instructions to jurors, before they went for their decision.

A long read but worth tackling it, should anyone care to.
http://nationalpost.com/news/canada/full-transcript-of-judges-instructions-to-colten-boushie-jury-put-yourself-in-a-jurors-shoes

He goes into witness believability a number of times.
jb
« Last Edit: February 22, 2018, 02:19:42 PM by jellybean »

Sap1

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Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #96 on: March 07, 2018, 04:09:47 AM »
RCMP watchdog takes up the investigation of how Colten Boushie case was handled.

Crime scene investigation was incomplete and sloppy.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatchewan/rcmp-sloppy-and-negligent-in-investigating-colten-boushie-s-death-say-independent-experts-1.4564050

This is a very long CBC article with graphic content. They interviewed specialists in the field of forensic evidence analysis.

I won't post it because CBC article links don't go dead after awhile.

jtmtpleasant

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Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #97 on: March 07, 2018, 10:45:26 AM »
The blatant ignorance in this thread is astounding. Two grown ass people talking shit about an Indigenous man shot point blank in the head by an ignorant racist hillbilly. And you wonder why reconciliation isn't working.

And who gives a shit if they were driving around drinking. I know many white people who grew up in Sask who say they've done the same thing. It's normal. There is literally nothing for teens to do and that's what they do. It's not an "Indian problem" you arrogant fools when white people are doing it too.

No person, whether you're Indigenous, white, purple, yellow or green ffs deserve's to get a bullet in the head.

But keep on trash talking Indigenous people and their ancestors, hillbillies. They're not the problem. You are.

Sap1

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Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #98 on: March 07, 2018, 12:20:46 PM »
jtmtpleasant, I was comparing crimes because it seems when a murder is committed there is a lot of shit thrown at whites too ... not just the perpetrator. You are right ... whites, blacks, indigenous ... youths drink and drive and party. Some of them. I grew up in a small community too. I played baseball, cricket, and spent time with animals, so I find it difficult to understand why some think drinking and driving is such a wonderful pastime.

Never did I say Colten deserved the bullet he got to his head, nor any of them for that matter. It brings tears to my eyes because just to hear that, I visualize how it happened and what the scene looked like, and it repulses me greatly. I also felt strongly regarding how the police handled the situation. I don't side with Stanley either, but I understand others' fears. I lived in the country too and had indigenous youths come up my driveway too and never thought to arm myself, but I know I would have had the fear of God in me, had a car full of people of any color driven up erratically.

I do not know if the Stanley family is racist. I have read those comments from Indigenous people. There were signs made up that Colten was shot on Indigenous land. This is where I see red! That being Indigenous land needs to be hashed out with government. My father came to Canada and bought his piece of land with blood, sweat and tears! What I own, as a single parent was also done for my kids`sake with blood, sweat and tears. What we own is ours! We am not the government! Nobody takes my things as theirs!
   

   

Sap1

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Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #99 on: March 07, 2018, 03:17:10 PM »
CBC TV had more on the subject with Anthony Gerein, Assistant Deputy of Attorney General, making a public statement as to why no appeal will be held. Not yet online, but CBC TV is well worth watching for it.

Perhaps after the independent review of police procedure is finished, there may be a possibility of another appeal.
 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatoon/boushie-s-uncle-says-it-s-like-waiting-for-a-verdict-all-over-again-1.4565538

Sap1

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Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #100 on: March 07, 2018, 04:26:31 PM »
Excerpt from another type of forum from a full blood Mohawk indigenous man. Name removed because no doubt he will not be very popular either.

Quote
no need to look into it trudeau and politicians should have kept their noses and big mouths out of it though !!!!! first of all im full mohawk and a father of a murdered 24 year old son i sat through 2 trials with a double dealing docket clearing crown attourney and 2 candyass sentencing judges one she made her own new law on the spot still on appeal however as a family man and land owner if 5 thugs tresspass onto my property steal my atv start slamming into my equipment and damaging my property i worked hard for come and im not sure where my wife and family are at the time you can bet ill come and use whatever force is necessary to end it and if i used a weapon i wouldnt miss and wouldnt misfire either nor would i be looking for colour of skin or religious beleifs or race its full blown protect my family my property and myself and i would be within my full rights to do so however i did read the court documents on this and the only fault is in the 45 minute judges charge to the jury which takes over 90 minutes to read he only mentioned that the jury could come back with a manslaughter verdict instead only once should have been at least 3 times ive been there and done that he should have made sure the jury had that in their minds but it didnt happen now you have big mouth politicians virtue signalling pandering for votes jumping in now no fair appeal; can be heard so it can never happen legally thank your local liberal on more of their lunacy as for the jury over half involved in selection were first nations and like most were not selected i cant give reasons we dont know why my guess criminal records or bias from their answers given in questioning but jury selection no matter the race in canada is generally fair so quit trying to use the race card on this the farmer protected his property just as i would and i am first nations and i wouldnt think to look for race colour of skin or religious beleif however i would have expected a manslaughter charge minimal but govt has to keep its big mouth shut in court matters and its time judges were appointed by judges and not any govt so they remain impartial to any political belief same as the attourney generals position and our ethics commissoners should be appointed by our judges and not govt so its fair law in this country for all

Quote
************ i am mohawk and do follow the red road but im dam sick and tired of ones using the race card for thugs of any race or religious belief and its fuelled by this liberal lunacy of today i feel for the family i know their loss but facts are facts if i were in that farmers shoes knowing my family is at risk and my property and the rcmp are 2 hours away from showing you can bet im coming and using all force necessary i will not bury another family member this way to unnecessary violence i also know what its like to be red growing up in a white racist town and having to fight to survive until more came in first a chineese family then 3 families of blacks and we went back to back and the hate went into the closet and i know what its like to be red and face cops and been through the courts many times myself i refuse to say there will be a racist jury this day and age there isnt one but i do not agree with the judge he should have told the jury at least 3 times that they can bring back manslaughter and it was one time and in passing a long drawn out statement but it infuriated me even more to see this liberal govt with its head lunatic weigh in with his big mouth where it doesnt belong and destroy any chance of the family getting an appeal to bring in manslaughter is rare it can happen but in this case it was a possibility until trudeau opened his big mouth now no unbias verdict can be given govt shouldnt have anything to do with our courts not even appointing judges that should be a panel of top judges same as the postions of attourney generals and our ethics commissioners by the courts not the govt then even our politicians would be treated the same under the law as they should be as any other canadian but ill stop there as this govt irates me worse than the time of justins daddy did

jellybean

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Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #101 on: March 07, 2018, 04:34:49 PM »
You are so right, in that what we own is ours. We work hard for it, we pay for it, we own it. Land included.

The aboriginals signed Treaty Rights, and every band Treaty is different. Their forefathers negotiated these treaties, just as our forefathers tilled the land,grew cities, set up education and health care, law and order and a democratic government whereby everyone 18 and over has the right to vote. Aboriginals INCLUDED.

The Aboriginals have our attention as to their plight, but some wish to push it. As I have said, using the Boushie's as an example of Aboriginal Injustice is poor judgement. These kids were up to no good that afternoon.

And to muddle up things, the shooter exercised poor judgement that day as well..... The young tresspasers should have had multiple charges placed against them.    They were charged with nothing.  And in addition to Second Degree Murder,  an assortment of charges should have been levied against Mr. Stanley. Both sides are wrong.

I too am sick and tired of thugs, thieves, and dope heads, regardless of race. From what I have read, it is still going on in rural areas, with poor response times by law and order.

Regarding the Bouchie/Stanley tragic incident, sloppy forensic work by the RCMP have further muddied the waters for true justice.  Major screw ups, oversights, and neglectful handling of evidence, have done a disserivice to the Stanley and the Bouchie families.  Thanks to the RCMP bungling of this one, we will never get a fair and clear eyed view on exactly what happened on that tragic day.

Shame on them.

jb






 

« Last Edit: March 07, 2018, 05:23:10 PM by jellybean »

Sap1

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Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #102 on: March 07, 2018, 07:40:43 PM »
The blatant ignorance in this thread is astounding. Two grown ass people talking shit about an Indigenous man shot point blank in the head by an ignorant racist hillbilly. And you wonder why reconciliation isn't working.

And who gives a shit if they were driving around drinking. I know many white people who grew up in Sask who say they've done the same thing. It's normal. There is literally nothing for teens to do and that's what they do. It's not an "Indian problem" you arrogant fools when white people are doing it too.

No person, whether you're Indigenous, white, purple, yellow or green ffs deserve's to get a bullet in the head.

But keep on trash talking Indigenous people and their ancestors, hillbillies. They're not the problem. You are.

There is nothing more racist than your comments on this thread and MMWI jtmtpleasant!

In the bolded statement above, that is so not true; it is total hogwash and just more excuses for unaccountable people. Alcohol is expensive and marijuana costs $ 200. for 28 grams. For that amount of money they could buy a number of things at discount places and start a business. Nothing wrong with getting remnants of wood, carpet pieces and making cat scratching posts and little houses, and making stands for water and food bowls for large dog dishes. Girls can learn arm knitting and make affinity scarves. All good sellers at craft fairs. Damn straight I would buy these things and I know others would too. All instructions are on you tube and all of the youths have access. Of course, it's not as fun as getting drunk but it's a whole lot safer and they can earn money.

There are also a number of sports things that can be set up for cheap. There are absolutely many things that all of the youths could do with their time that is not expensive. 


jellybean

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Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #103 on: March 07, 2018, 08:34:03 PM »
jmtpleasant;

AS I said, both were in the wrong.  Stanley and the kids who went onto that property. They also attempted to steal from another farm, before they arrived at the Stanley's.  One also tried to start a vehicle at the Stanley's.  So, ??

And as I had said, Aboriginals should be on juries, where an Aboriginal is to stand trial, or in the case of Mr. Stanley.

I have stuck up for the plight of Aboriginals in regards to their living conditions.  The reasons are complex, in some cases, bad Chief's, in other cases deaf ears of the white world.


There are many Aboriginals  who are gainfully employed, raise good families, but we never hear about them. 

The Mohawk had made some excellent points.

And it is about time that Aboriginals start to point this out to us.  That is, there are many who are gainfully employed and raise good families. Fight back with that!!

All that we ever hear or see are run down reserves, and people living in terrible conditions.
There are successful reserves, but we never hear about them.

It is time that Canadians did.  Otherwise we feel that the situation is overwhelming, and that is not a good thing.  Nor is it a snapshot of those who lead successful lives. And that is unfair.

I am wiping the cobwebs out of my eyes, and perhaps you should do the same.

Sad Ass White

JB

« Last Edit: March 07, 2018, 09:07:22 PM by jellybean »

Sap1

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Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #104 on: March 12, 2018, 08:12:19 PM »
CBC's criticizing post on the investigation was made worse by an oversight. On TV and also a small print as an update to an earlier long article, the following is the mistake they made. Lies and stories will now have to be changed to reflect that, and most likely there will be no acceptance to the retraction at all.

Quote
Corrections
A previous version of this story said that after first arresting Gerald Stanley, the RCMP released him from custody before taking a formal statement. In fact, he was not released from custody. A previous version of this story also said there's no indication the RCMP ever seized Stanley's clothes. In fact, they did seize the clothing he was wearing at the time of the shooting.
Mar 12, 2018 2:34 PM CT