Author Topic: The life and death of Colten Boushie  (Read 9089 times)

Sap1

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Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #60 on: February 15, 2018, 05:03:13 PM »
This following is being passed around to all corners. Apparently written by a lawyer. ::) A very poorly informed lawyer. This what they are believing.

debbiec

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Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #61 on: February 15, 2018, 05:21:37 PM »
Honestly, I have no words for what is happening surrounding this case. If the situation was reversed, what we are seeing here would likely not be happening. Then we would likely be hearing that the "trespasser" was shot in self defense after racial tensions made him fear for his own life.

Sap1

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Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #62 on: February 15, 2018, 05:47:13 PM »
The attitudes are absolutely mind boggling Debbie.

The White Privilege farmers worked, saved and bought the land with their own blood, sweat and tears. These people who feel they have a right to go and trespass on land to which a white man holds the title to, take it up with the government, because after all, they are the ones to always get the governments ears and actions.   

Sap1

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Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #63 on: February 15, 2018, 08:15:37 PM »
To be clear, I am not taking sides. I was shocked that Stanley didn't get at least a manslaughter conviction. We do not tolerate vigilante justice in this country; it's illegal. (Except I would turn a blind eye if SK's or SR's were done in without proper justice).
There were a lot of lies on both sides. Under oath Colten's friends admitted some of their lies and gave different stories, yet no one seems to believe them? That is the way it sounds. On social media it sounds as though the group were just out for a leisurely drive, had a flat and stopped at a few farms for help when being targeted with violence. Lies by omission. Whitewashing. Making it all about race. I have seen more hate against the whites than I have against the indigenous people.

jellybean

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Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #64 on: February 15, 2018, 08:22:27 PM »
http://www.vancourier.com/opinion/opinion-there-is-so-much-wrong-being-said-by-both-sides-about-the-gerald-stanley-trial-1.23174002

The above article dispells myths about the trial. It hits the nail right on the head.
about this whole mess. 

Snipped

Much has been made of the all-white jury. But the calling of 750 potential jurors of a jury pool is extraordinary. That was a deliberate attempt by the court to provide as wide a jury pool as possible, and certainly larger than anything I encountered. That just a sliver of those potential jurors showed up is a reflection that many people, including First Nations people, did not wish to put in an effort for this case. Perhaps if all, or even most, of those 750 Much has been made of the all-white jury. But the calling of 750 potential jurors of a jury pool is extraordinary. That was a deliberate attempt by the court to provide as wide a jury pool as possible, and certainly larger than anything I encountered. That just a sliver of those potential jurors showed up is a reflection that many people, including First Nations people, did not wish to put in an effort for this case. Perhaps if all, or even most, of those 750 people showed up, given the local demographics and substantial Indigenous population, it would have been impossible for the defence to challenge them all people of visible minorities. There would have been too many.

Many, many people have said this case justified people defending their property. Some people seem to think it happened in the middle of the night ? it didn?t. It was late afternoon. The defense did not claim a defence of property, nor did it claim self-defence on behalf of Gerald Stanley. They claimed it was an accident, and the jury ? 12 people, who heard all the evidence ? believed it.

The defence of accident was significantly based on the presence of a bulged shell casing found on the dashboard of the SUV. That part has been frequently left out in the coverage and commentary.

A great many people think the five in the Ford Escape were just looking for help with a tire, yet that is not what their own testimony reflected. They did not testify they walked up to the house to ask for help, or to the people working on the fence. Rather, they testified they had been ?checking? vehicles, on another farm before coming to the Stanley farm. They testified to trying to start a quad. That is not asking for help, nor asking for a floor jack.
Many people have said those in the vehicle were unarmed. That is false. They drove into that yard with a loaded .22 rifle, albeit damaged from their attempt to break into a vehicle in a nearby farm just before. The SUV had live rounds and spent .22 casings in it, as they had been shooting that day.

From my experience as a court reporter, there could have been a slew of charges on both sides. Gerald Stanley could have been charged with various firearms charges regarding storage and careless usage, for instance, charges that may have stuck if they had been included in the trial. The occupants of the SUV could have been charged with similar firearms charges from their attendance at both farms. There could have been charged with similar firearms charges from their attendance at both farms. There could have been impaired driving charges as well, given their various (and often contradictory) testimony implied different drivers. They also could have been charged with armed robbery, use of a firearm in commission of an indictable offence, attemptedattempted theft and mischief charges. Possibly perjury, too. For whatever reason, we didn?t see that.

Gerald Stanley was found ?not guilty? of second degree murder and manslaughter. That is not ?innocent.? There is a distinction.

Emotions are high and tempers are flaring. There has been an enormous amount of racism, and a great deal of outright fallacies, expressed by ?supporters? on both sides of this case. The whole affair has greatly set back relations between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people of Saskatchewan.
How we come back from that, I don?t know.
« Last Edit: February 15, 2018, 08:26:00 PM by jellybean »

Sap1

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Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #65 on: February 16, 2018, 12:57:49 AM »
Wow! Interesting indeed. Don't show up for selection and then make a big stink afterwards regarding NO indigenous people on the jury!

Quote
Much has been made of the all-white jury. But the calling of 750 potential jurors of a jury pool is extraordinary. That was a deliberate attempt by the court to provide as wide a jury pool as possible, and certainly larger than anything I encountered. That just a sliver of those potential jurors showed up is a reflection that many people, including First Nations people, did not wish to put in an effort for this case. Perhaps if all, or even most, of those 750 people showed up, given the local demographics and substantial Indigenous population, it would have been impossible for the defence to challenge them all people of visible minorities. There would have been too many.

jellybean

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Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #66 on: February 16, 2018, 02:01:37 AM »
From what I have read 5 showed up but were challenged.  Others did not have a way to get there and needed to be sequesterd, due to lack of transportation.

They have an answer for everything, it seems.

jb



« Last Edit: February 16, 2018, 02:21:37 AM by jellybean »

Sap1

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Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #67 on: February 16, 2018, 02:13:56 AM »
From what I have read 5 showed up but were challenged.  Others did not have a way to get there and needed to be sequesterd, due to lack of transportation.

jb

I am sorry if they did not have transportation, but then why blame it on the justice system?

jellybean

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Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #68 on: February 16, 2018, 02:25:17 AM »
Quote
I am sorry if they did not have transportation, but then why blame it on the justice system?

Exactly! 
Something could have been arranged, but at least they could have made an
attempt to show up the first time, and if chosen, work it out with the system for transportation. Fair to say, not all whites showed up either. Seems few really  wanted to get involved in that trial. Out of 750 requests to attend for jury selection,  only 200 people showed up. 

jb



« Last Edit: February 16, 2018, 02:46:52 AM by jellybean »

Sap1

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Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #69 on: February 16, 2018, 02:59:55 AM »
I know that probably many lived on the RP reserve and may not have had their own transportation, and sadly that probably is the same for taking on a job where a vehicle is required. That is something that could be looked into for the future. Relatives or friends living in the town/city could put 'out of towners' up for a period.

Sap1

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Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #70 on: February 16, 2018, 01:18:55 PM »
Just for the record, perusing around, I did find a comment by a FN person that did sound very much like a death threat against Mr. Stanley and when I went back to find it, the comment was gone. Two wrongs don't make a right. Violence is violence no matter who/which side does it.

debbiec

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Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #71 on: February 16, 2018, 01:33:47 PM »
I'm not sure who has that page, but perhaps the comment was removed by Admin (as it should have been).

I'm sure in the past there have been court cases that did not have the ending that everyone involved, wanted. I wonder if the people who felt the verdict handed down by a jury, was not just, had visited Ottawa, would they have gotten this much attention in regard changing the way a jury is selected? 

Sap1

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Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #72 on: February 16, 2018, 02:32:17 PM »
I'm not sure who has that page, but perhaps the comment was removed by Admin (as it should have been).

I'm sure in the past there have been court cases that did not have the ending that everyone involved, wanted. I wonder if the people who felt the verdict handed down by a jury, was not just, had visited Ottawa, would they have gotten this much attention in regard changing the way a jury is selected?

Debbie the comment was on a personal FB page, so probably the page owner or the writer removed it. Police may be monitoring some FB pages. The author of the threat was quite distant (in mileage) so that is why I didn't take a copy of it at the time I saw it.

In regard visiting Ottawa, no I don't think so.
Jody Wilson-Raybould, PM Trudeau and the whole lot of people looking into this fracus also need to dig deeper, especially considering the huge leeway Justice Popescul gave in regards to the amount of people called for jury selection, the small showing, and why. There was, imo, very much equal opportunity for fair indigenous people's representation on the jury, had they taken advantage of it. I guess many people must have known or felt that the young men and women were in the wrong to begin with in every move they made that day. 
I sent that link to Rosemary Barton CBC so she could delve into as that is what she does ... get to the bottom. So if she thinks it is worthwhile, hopefully she does. The truth needs to be out there.

Where there is smoke there is usually fire. Downplaying a severe concern and distracting from truths with a militant stance somewhere else, is not going to solve the problems in that area.

jellybean

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Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #73 on: February 17, 2018, 02:11:53 PM »
https://saskatoon.ctvnews.ca/i-was-stupid-crown-witness-says-he-lied-about-events-leading-up-to-boushie-shooting-1.3784627

A Crown witness in the trial of a Saskatchewan farmer charged with shooting an Indigenous man on his property said he lied to police and the Crown about carrying a gun and attempting to break into a truck on the day his friend was killed.
Cassidy Cross admitted, under cross-examination, he changed his story one day before taking the witness stand Thursday. The 18-year-old was testifying on day three of evidence at the second-degree murder trial of Gerald Stanley.

?After the trial started you thought it good to take the Crown and the police officer aside and say, ?Actually, we did have a gun. It was my gun. We were stealing. We used the gun to try and break into a vehicle??" defence lawyer Scott Spencer asked. "So that's all stuff you told the police last night after court?"

Cross was driving an SUV carrying four friends that entered Stanley's farm on Aug. 9, 2016.
Stanley, 56, has pleaded not guilty to second-degree murder after another man in that vehicle, 22-year-old Colten Boushie, was shot in the back of the head.
Cross testified he had about 30 shots of alcohol and was drunk on the day of the shooting.

Court has already heard that, at around the same time of the shooting, RCMP received a report about a suspected theft from a truck at a farm about 15 to 20 kilometres from the Stanley property. A grey SUV with a flat tire, matching the one Cross was driving, was spotted at that scene and police found the broken stock of a gun.

Cross initially told investigators he and his four friends in the SUV were just checking out the truck, but on the stand, he admitted he and another man, Eric Meechance, were trying to steal and that they had used the gun to attempt to break in.
"I lied about me going into that truck," he testified. "My intentions were to go steal."

The SUV then rolled up to the Stanley farm, but Cross said the group was simply looking for help with the tire.
"I wasn't there to steal," he told court.

Stanley's son, Sheldon, has testified he and his dad heard an ATV start and thought it was being stolen. The pair ran toward the SUV and Sheldon said he hit the windshield with a hammer as the driver tried to leave the farm.

Cross was driving an SUV carrying four friends that entered Stanley's farm on Aug. 9, 2016.
Stanley, 56, has pleaded not guilty to second-degree murder after another man in that vehicle, 22-year-old Colten Boushie, was shot in the back of the head.
Cross testified he had about 30 shots of alcohol and was drunk on the day of the shooting.
Court has already heard that, at around the same time of the shooting, RCMP received a report about a suspected theft from a truck at a farm about 15 to 20 kilometres from the Stanley property. A grey SUV with a flat tire, matching the one Cross was driving, was spotted at that scene and police found the broken stock of a gun.

Cross initially told investigators he and his four friends in the SUV were just checking out the truck, but on the stand, he admitted he and another man, Eric Meechance, were trying to steal and that they had used the gun to attempt to break in.
"I lied about me going into that truck," he testified. "My intentions were to go steal."
The SUV then rolled up to the Stanley farm, but Cross said the group was simply looking for help with the tire.
"I wasn't there to steal," he told court.
Stanley's son, Sheldon, has testified he and his dad heard an ATV start and thought it was being stolen. The pair ran toward the SUV and Sheldon said he hit the windshield with a hammer as the driver tried to leave the farm.


capeheart

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Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #74 on: February 17, 2018, 02:51:23 PM »
Sap1, I feel in this instance they just made and magnified the fact that it was a native that was killed and not just say a "man" was killed when a farmer tried to protect his property. That is the whole problem, the US deals with the same words related to any crimes that are committed. Not once did the family acknowledge the fact that Colten was in a place and involved in activity that he should not have been. People know the truth, they are not stupid. They know in the area the farmers have been dealing with the problem of thefts for quite some time. So eventually it was going to happen, either a farmer or the intruder was going to end up losing, either their life are being injured.  We see it all the time lately, "home invasions", they are called down here. The Maritimes have had serious crimes committed against innocent individuals of people looking for money and they were  beaten people to death in their own homes.  So I have a very best friend that lives in a small village about 30 miles from me and they are kind of at the end of the vilage and not many houses and it is a through road that goes to another area of Cape Breton. They have a big sign on their lawn, a picture of a big gun and a message "WE DON'T CALL 9-11'.  Now her husband is not a violent man, he may have a gun, I never saw it ever, but he possibly has a rifle.  So he has a warning on the lawn, in other words, don't tangle with me.  So owners of the property should have a sign "ABSOLUTELY NO TRESPASSING.'  I feel that the natives blame everyone else, they do not take ownership of any wrongs, it is always somebody else's fault. And it is not mainly the person who did them wrong as such, but they clump everyone in the same group.  I hope that they get the help they need and let this settle down and people get back to normal and respect one another's property.