Author Topic: The life and death of Colten Boushie  (Read 12269 times)

Sap1

  • Member
  • Posts: 1203
    • View Profile
Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #45 on: February 13, 2018, 03:14:06 PM »
Well that is what we have to get used to hearing because this is only the beginning. Downplay in one area and Up play in other areas. Prejudicial comments. There are many prejudices on both sides.

jellybean

  • Member
  • Posts: 8201
  • Tired of Crime not doing their time
    • View Profile
Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #46 on: February 13, 2018, 03:50:45 PM »
So soon - and already it is getting out of hand - out there!

jb

Sap1

  • Member
  • Posts: 1203
    • View Profile
Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #47 on: February 13, 2018, 04:13:19 PM »
And PM Trudeau is under fire by all other political parties regarding comments he made from California ... they and legal experts are saying that what Trudeau said via Twitter, could jeopardize an appeal for Colten. That is what happens when problems are not discussed/approached properly and reasonably ... everything began with a huge knee jerk and wham bam, off to Ottawa demanding to be heard. Political leaders then also had knee jerk reactions. Answers are demanded yesterday.
Colten Boushie is being used over a long smoldering hot pot of problems.

 https://globalnews.ca/news/4022425/colten-boushie-justin-trudeau-appeal/
« Last Edit: February 13, 2018, 04:20:42 PM by Sap1 »

jellybean

  • Member
  • Posts: 8201
  • Tired of Crime not doing their time
    • View Profile
Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #48 on: February 13, 2018, 05:05:37 PM »
Quote
Colten Boushie is being used over a long smoldering hot pot of problems.

Yes, it feels like his death is being exploited. "

Some FN people are already whitewashing the incident where the kids were involved.  The kids did nothing wrong?

Perhaps they still believe the original story given to the Battleford Now news by one of the youths.  This story has since been dispelled in the trial.
Here is the link

http://battlefordsnow.com/article/528674/he-just-came-out-nowhere-biggar-shooting-witness-speaks

I am all for the Boushie family raising money - by GoFundMe. No doubt they can use it.  There will be lawyer fees, travel expenses, etc. 

But, the person who initiated the GFM  should not whitewash the kids behaviour. They were not out for a "Sunday drive". as is claimed.

In fairness, some  FN people should have been on that jury. That is a major complaint, and it is a reasonable one. in my opinion.

 If the FN people want our empathy (note, I did not say sympathy) and understanding of their general plight, and an agreement to see a balanced justice system, using Coltan's tragic death is not the way to go about it.  The general population have read the trial versions, as to what actually happened that day, and minimizing the behaviour of these young adults that day is anything but helpful to their cause.  It can undo all of the inroads that they have made for their causes.

Trust works both ways you know.
Sadly the first version of the youth as to events given in the newspaper was a lie.  The version changed during trial. Their stories of the event was  remarkably different.

People will believe whatever version they feel comfortable with I suppose.
I have a feeling that not everything came out at that trial - on both sides.

Is a retrial  warranted?.. Both sides were wrong that tragic day.
Two wrongs do not  make it right.

Unfortunately, I am now under the impression  the FN will only  settle for a guilty verdict, and should the verdict be the same - [not guilty] would they accept it?

There are too many things to be done..... lots of improvements on their lists are sorely needed. They will need the cooperation of the Provincial & Federal governments and it's people  to make any headway in progress for better living conditions, and the list goes on - and rightly so.
But dragging this trial into the mix may not be helpful in the long run.

[modified to include link to Battleford Now news)

jb


« Last Edit: February 15, 2018, 06:24:17 PM by jellybean »

Sap1

  • Member
  • Posts: 1203
    • View Profile
Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #49 on: February 13, 2018, 10:22:37 PM »
Well that Sunday drive was to a river, lots of drinking, some swimming and then leaving there with a drunk person behind the wheel ... he swerved into a ditch which caused a tire to pop. Before going into Stanley`s driveway, they had been to two other farmers. They claimed they just drove away because no one was home and at the second farm they tried to smash into a truck leaving the stock of a gun there before heading to Stanley`s.
These farmers are all armed so they must be having problems with thefts. According to FB comments, there were alerts sent out when someone saw police in the area; comments made about scoring gas at times. All farmers have large gas tanks in their yards.
All their choices  that Sunday were very bad. They are all culpable.

jellybean

  • Member
  • Posts: 8201
  • Tired of Crime not doing their time
    • View Profile
Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #50 on: February 15, 2018, 01:14:55 AM »
This article is snipped. 
https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/boushie-family-vows-to-seek-justice-system-changes/article37988696/

The family of slain Cree man Colten Boushie left Ottawa on Wednesday vowing to continue their fight for justice after securing from the federal government a commitment to change the jury-selection process.

and =

Justin Trudeau said that, as a country, Canada must commit to ensuring no family has to face what they've endured. He committed his government to making changes to the justice system that will include the way juries are selected.
and =

Eleanore Sunchild, a lawyer for the family, said that the work will also continue back in Saskatchewan. She mentioned pushing for reforms to legal aid, to ensure proper representation for Indigenous accused, as well as more sensitive treatment for the families of Indigenous victims of crime. "We hope that changes will be made to ensure the inclusion and fair treatment of Indigenous peoples in the Canadian justice system. The changes to jury selection is only one issue that needs to be addressed. There are other issues that were problematic in this case such as the RCMP's conduct," Ms. Sunchild said.

"The family chose to speak so that no more Indigenous people are forced to go through such a terrible ordeal. Justice for Colten is larger than the Gerald Stanley trial."

debbiec

  • Administrator
  • Member
  • Posts: 4776
  • Site Admin
    • View Profile
Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #51 on: February 15, 2018, 11:25:44 AM »
I wonder how many of the public are actually aware of what proceeded this shooting, and what had been going on in that area for some time. As was stated in an earlier post, these 'boys' weren't out for a Sunday drive.

Sap1

  • Member
  • Posts: 1203
    • View Profile
Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #52 on: February 15, 2018, 11:39:17 AM »
According to FB posts of some people ... they actually believe Colten was the one sleeping in the car when it entered Stanley's drive.
Some articles make it look as though Colten was the actual driver, while another report claims another man was at the wheel and when he jumped out of the car to check out the ATV, Colten shifted to the driver's side.
It is apparent to me that none of the media do any real fact checking.

Sap1

  • Member
  • Posts: 1203
    • View Profile
Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #53 on: February 15, 2018, 12:01:05 PM »
Really people!! FN peoples are complaining that only their young men are thrown in jail. Do you think police do that for shits and giggles?!
The following link has links of what consequences followed some criminal behavior. When committing criminal offences and being armed while doing so, Police will do whatever force is necessary to keep themselves and the public secure.
You don't want to get shot and pursued? Don't live a life of crime! Simple!! How do you downplay reckless use of a firearm in public, and at officers of the law?
One media source claimed the victim of the police shooting was falsely accused and pointed out! Then there are reports he was into gang behavior.
Be honest! Hiding and whitewashing criminal behavior doesn't solve problems.

 https://www.google.ca/search?source=hp&ei=zcWFWuecEsek8QXog564BQ&q=RCMP+shoot+22+year+old+near+Onion+Lake&oq=RCMP+shoot+22+year+old+near+Onion+Lake&gs_l=psy-ab.3...1424.16182.0.17019.38.37.0.1.1.0.279.6939.2-28.28.0....0...1c.1.64.psy-ab..9.26.6205...0j0i131k1j0i10k1j33i22i29i30k1j33i21k1j33i160k1.0.JDqu3YYF5-Q

jellybean

  • Member
  • Posts: 8201
  • Tired of Crime not doing their time
    • View Profile
Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #54 on: February 15, 2018, 12:57:23 PM »
 
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatoon/stanley-verdict-again-raising-concerns-over-rural-crime-1.4535146

'Frustrated and helpless': Rural residents say Stanley trial highlights crime, police response time concerns
RCMP says too many variables affect response times to be able to give accurate picture
By Charles Hamilton, CBC News Posted: Feb 14, 2018 4:15 PM CT Last Updated: Feb 15, 2018 11:19 AM CT

 Snipped.....
Feelings of frustration and helplessness are simmering in rural parts of Saskatchewan in the wake of the Gerald Stanley trial, which reignited long-standing concerns over crime and law enforcement's ability to adequately respond to it.
"I want the country to know it's a problem we have here," said Lee de Coninck Smith, the founder of a Facebook page called Farmers with Firearms.
Smith said the page was created to help people living in rural parts of the province cope with what he says is a growing problem of crime and slow RCMP response times. He says the idea is to have a place where neighbours can look out for each other.
The page has a prominent message warning that posts or comments containing racist remarks or promoting illegal activity will not be tolerated and that any such posts will be deleted, as will ones having to do with the Stanley trial.

Full coverage of Gerald Stanley trial
What happened on Gerald Stanley's farm the day Colten Boushie was shot, as told by witnesses

In recent months, the popularity of the page has exploded, and with close to 8,500 followers and more than 8,000 likes as of early Thursday.
Ryan, whose last name CBC agreed to withhold because of concerns he says he has for his safety, farms in southwestern Saskatchewan and is a member of the group. He says he knows neighbours and friends who've experienced theft.

"Frustrated and helpless would be the two things I would say [farmers feel]," he said in an interview with CBC News at his family farm Wednesday. "There's all walks of life that are committing these crimes.
"Snowmobiles, ATVs ? these are big-ticket items that are easy to grab and easy to get rid of. Anything that's not bolted down, it can be taken."
« Last Edit: February 15, 2018, 01:55:13 PM by jellybean »

Sap1

  • Member
  • Posts: 1203
    • View Profile
Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #55 on: February 15, 2018, 01:28:03 PM »
Police jurisdictions on the southern ends of provinces need to pull together and share info if they still are not doing so.
On FB and general comments, people blame FN people for ALL the crimes, especially now in light of the Boushie tragedy, however, there are reports of Americans crossing the border and committing crimes as well, especially thefts.
The following link shows somewhat high end vehicles ...  one with Idaho license plates. I can't get the video to load but as much as I can see, these are Caucasians. AND they are armed and will shoot to keep their stolen wares.
Back in the 70's there was a lot of cattle rustling going on down south as well and very organized big time liners used. It probably never stopped.

https://globalnews.ca/news/3630217/rcmp-search-for-suspects-who-shot-at-farm-shop-owner-in-southern-alberta/

A ranch hand who was shot at following a robbery in Springbank, Alta., told Global News the situation could have ?gone south in a hurry? if the thieves had ?turned their gun a separate way or misfired.?

RCMP said that on July 27, at around 7 a.m., employees interrupted the suspects as they were loading the stolen property onto a vehicle.

WATCH: Crimes on rural properties outside of Calgary seem to be on the rise. Several have recently been hit by thieves, and authorities worry they?re getting more brazen. Jill Croteau reports.

Dawson Northcott said he heard one of the ATVs leaving the ranch. He then pulled up the security camera feed on his phone to find the suspects in a Ford truck ?loading stuff onto the back of it.?

Northcott said that, as he was trying to get the license plate on the truck, it sped away.  He followed the truck only to be intercepted by a red SUV that pulled in front of him.

?It pulls off into a no exit road and the red SUV pulls up on my passenger side and shoots across my truck with a shotgun. So, when I pulled ahead, I let everyone go, because I wasn?t sticking around for that,? he said.

RCMP 5
RCMP are looking for this black Ford F150 and a red SUV with an Idaho license plate after a robbery in Springbank, Alta., on July 27, 2017.


He said he hadn?t expected the red SUV, which he had passed earlier as he was following the Ford truck, would be involved.

?My heart was racing,? he said.

Police are looking for a black Ford F-150 Fx4 with a red stripe down the side, with an Alberta licence plate, as well as a red SUV with an Idaho licence plate.

Anyone with information about this incident or any of the people involved is asked to call RCMP at (403) 851-8000 or contact Crime Stoppers.


? 2017 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.


jellybean

  • Member
  • Posts: 8201
  • Tired of Crime not doing their time
    • View Profile
Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #56 on: February 15, 2018, 02:08:33 PM »
I am beginning to think that getting out of the city and moving to a rural and peaceful area in the country is a myth. RCMP response times are often very late, due to the distance they must cover in patrolling their district, as an example. Not to mention slow response times for ambulances to arrive.

Country folk are sitting ducks for crime.

A good example is Trevor Vader, in Alberta who made his living stealing vehicles, and anything that wasn't nailed down, along with his buddies in a rural area of Alberta.   He ended up murdering an elderly couple who were on their way to BC and was found guilty.




jb


« Last Edit: February 15, 2018, 02:35:47 PM by jellybean »

jellybean

  • Member
  • Posts: 8201
  • Tired of Crime not doing their time
    • View Profile
Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #57 on: February 15, 2018, 02:44:08 PM »
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatchewan/gerald-stanley-colten-boushie-jury-verdict-1.4532064

I cannot shorten this article without losing its reasonings

What the Stanley jury likely considered in rendering its not guilty verdict
Jury's decision has sparked accusations of racism and calls to change the system

By Mark Gollom, CBC News Posted: Feb 13, 2018 3:00 AM CT Last Updated: Feb 13, 2018 7:57 AM CT

Unlike in the U.S., where jurors are permitted to speak freely to the media after they've rendered a verdict, Canadian jurors are legally barred from discussing the proceedings.

This means it's unlikely the public will ever know the reasoning behind a Saskatchewan jury's decision to acquit Gerald Stanley, 56, of second-degree murder in the death of Colten Boushie.

The verdict has sparked accusations of racism and outrage that Stanley's defence team was able to exclude members of the Indigenous community as potential jurors.

It has also prompted legal questions about the case and the basis on which the jury of five men and seven women may have reached its verdict.
CBC News spoke to legal experts to explain some of the issues the jury may have taken into consideration.

Boushie, 22, was killed by a single gunshot to the back of his head after an altercation between Stanley, Boushie and four other young adults from the Red Pheasant Cree Nation on Aug. 9, 2016. They had driven an SUV onto Stanley's rural property near Biggar, an hour's drive west of Saskatoon.
Stanley testified he had fired warning shots and, as he approached the SUV, believed his gun was empty.

He said when he reached inside Boushie's SUV to turn it off, the gun went off accidentally, but that he never pulled the trigger.
Instead, his defence team argued the gun went off because of "hang fire" ? a delayed discharge that resulted from having pulled the trigger earlier.

The prosecution dismissed that theory as nonsense, arguing there was nothing wrong with the gun, and that Stanley had pulled the trigger to kill Boushie.
 
At the end of the trial, the jury was left with three choices: convict Stanley of second-degree murder, convict him of the lesser charge of manslaughter, or acquit.
"Any one of those three could be said to be reasonably supported by the evidence,
said Toronto-based criminal defence lawyer David Butt.

Credibility of Crown witnesses
Given that Boushie was shot in the head, as well as the fact Stanley arguably had a motive to use force, it wasn't unreasonable to suggest the killing was intentional, meaning second-degree murder was a viable charge, said Michael Plaxton, an associate professor at the University of Saskatchewan's College of Law.
However, he said some credibility issues with Crown witnesses likely made it harder to conclude beyond a reasonable doubt that the killing was intentional.

Cassidy Cross-Whitstone, 18, one of the SUV passengers, testified that he lied about trying to break into a truck on another property near the Stanley farm and about how much he'd had to drink that day.

Another SUV passenger, Belinda Jackson, 24, also changed her story, making no mention in a previous statement to police that Stanley had shot Boushie. But she later told jurors she saw the defendant shoot him twice in the head while he was sitting in the SUV.
"Speaking generally, if the people who are telling the story are not believable, or aspects of their version of events are not credible or inconsistent, then it becomes more difficult to convince the jury that's really what happened," said Steven Penney, a University of Alberta law professor.

What about manslaughter?
If the jury did not believe Stanley intended to kill Boushie, the option of convicting him of manslaughter was available. Put simply, manslaughter is a dangerous act that causes death, but without intent to kill.
Canada has an extremely broad manslaughter law, in particular when a person is using a firearm in a careless manner, said Kent Roach, a University of Toronto law professor. A manslaughter conviction follows, then, whenever a person who is using a firearm in a careless manner ought to have known that someone could be seriously injured from the way he or she was was using the firearm, Roach said.
"For me, one of the enduring mysteries ... is why did [the jury] reject manslaughter," he said.

Penney agreed that an argument could certainly be made for a manslaughter conviction based on the evidence that Stanley was grossly negligent by brandishing a weapon in a way that was very dangerous and resulted in the death of Boushie.

But he said there's also an argument to be made that Stanley did take precautions, that he did attempt to figure out if the weapon was loaded at the time of his confrontation with Boushie. If that's true, or if there's a reasonable doubt, that could make a manslaughter conviction challenging, Penney said.
"I'm not suggesting that was the correct way to view it ? but it's not crazy if that's the way the evidence was presented."

Hang fire and two options
Plaxton, in a series of tweets, argued that based on the lack of statistical evidence of ''hang fire," the reasonableness for the jury to accept this theory seemed "pretty thin."
And if the jurors rejected the hang fire theory, Plaxton wrote, this means they may have felt they had been left two options: either convict Stanley of second-degree murder, or acquit.

"Once left with the all-or-nothing choice, the jury was left to ask whether it was convinced beyond a reasonable doubt that, in the midst of all that chaos in a blindingly-quick period of time, Stanley intended to fire the fatal shot.
"We know what it decided."

« Last Edit: February 15, 2018, 03:14:51 PM by jellybean »

Sap1

  • Member
  • Posts: 1203
    • View Profile
Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #58 on: February 15, 2018, 04:28:45 PM »
I am beginning to think that getting out of the city and moving to a rural and peaceful area in the country is a myth. RCMP response times are often very late, due to the distance they must cover in patrolling their district, as an example. Not to mention slow response times for ambulances to arrive.

Country folk are sitting ducks for crime.

A good example is Trevor Vader, in Alberta who made his living stealing vehicles, and anything that wasn't nailed down, along with his buddies in a rural area of Alberta.   He ended up murdering an elderly couple who were on their way to BC and was found guilty.




jb

I would so love to live in the country, on an acreage but I would not feel safe unless I had at least a 10 foot high heavy chain fence with a well locked gate, and several pit bull dogs within the property, plus a security system on the house. That is way too expensive a way to live comfortable. Rural people are sitting ducks for crime more so than in the city. 

jellybean

  • Member
  • Posts: 8201
  • Tired of Crime not doing their time
    • View Profile
Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #59 on: February 15, 2018, 04:51:09 PM »
in the instance of Trevor, it looked like he would get off scott free, due to the judge making an error in his verbal statement in quoting the part of a criminal code that was no longer in effect.jb

However, it was eventually rectified, and justice was served.

jb