Author Topic: The life and death of Colten Boushie  (Read 10653 times)

capeheart

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Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #30 on: February 10, 2018, 09:18:44 PM »
It is the crown and defence that go through the lawyers, there are many people who are called to pick out 12 jurors. I've been in the courtroom when they made jury selection, it is quite a process.  It takes quite a while, there are many people called and you have no idea why some are denied. Some don't want to sit and give an excuse, health reasons or whatever. They ask them questions and so on and you have no idea why they picked them. It is a fair process that they do.

Sap1

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Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #31 on: February 11, 2018, 02:29:47 AM »
I just remembered hearing this before, that a jury is usually chosen as peers of the defendant. Is that correct? Young white males were also discluded from being jurors in this case.

Also when one gets the letter (3 full legal pages) there is not much wiggle room to not show up. One must show up and if one fails to do so, it is considered contempt of court. I was called when there was a spat of cases, one of which was Punky Gustafson, and I could not take all that time off work in case it was long and sequestered and I found one tiny little phrase in those three pages that covered me. A co-worker was also called and he said there were more than a hundred people interviewed before cuts.

I hope there is no more violence around this case.

 

Sap1

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Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #32 on: February 11, 2018, 04:50:05 PM »
I just saw this article. So many police officers descended onto Baptiste's residence the night Colten died elsewhere. No comfort given to the mother of Colten ... along with the words, "Colten is dead". Instead the residence was searched like a criminal's. There were 6 officers there at one time. If there were that many officers on one shift, they have enough officers to man the farm country, imo.
If this kind of behavior doesn't stop there is no hope of bringing peace and get both sides together and talking.
More info at link below.

  https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/colten-boushie/article32451940/

Excerpt:
The flash of headlights in the darkness drew Debbie Baptiste to the window. Outside she could see a convoy of vehicles barreling down a quiet dirt road that runs through Saskatchewan's Red Pheasant reserve. The cars pulled in to her yard at speed and cut across the rain-soaked grass to surround the trailer.

"I think they're here for us," Ms. Baptiste said to her son William, who was watching TV on the couch.

The two of them went to the door. Thoughts of her son Colten, who was late getting home that night, ran through Ms. Baptiste's mind. He was the baby of the family, the one who normally stayed close to her. So many police descending at once couldn't be good news.

Four uniformed RCMP officers approached their trailer, while several others stood watch outside, Ms. Baptiste said. Some officers had their weapons out and were scanning the property as though they were prepared for trouble, according to several witnesses.

"Is Colten Boushie your son?" the officers asked.

"Yes, he is," Ms. Baptiste replied.

"He's deceased," one of the officers told her.


Ms. Baptiste couldn't comprehend what she was hearing. Colten was the gentle one, the optimist, the one who persevered when his crippled arm briefly prevented him from working. He was a ceremonial fire keeper whose certificates of good citizenship she'd kept in a folder since he was five.

She let out a scream so urgent and anguished that those who heard it recall it with a shudder. She fell to her knees right there on the porch.

One of the officers said, "Somebody take her inside."

Ms. Baptiste lay on the floor of the trailer with her hands pressed to her head, rocking back and forth. The officers entered without asking permission and without offering much comfort, Ms. Baptiste said, an account confirmed by William.

"They were all in the living room. It was standing room only, all cops," Ms. Baptiste said.

The officers walked through each room with flashlights, waking William's two young sons.

"They searched everything, like they were looking for somebody, or something," Ms. Baptiste said.

The way they were treated struck them as callous, Ms. Baptiste and her sons later said. They want to know why, at a time of such distress, police rummaged through the family home, as though they'd done something wrong.

The RCMP have not provided a detailed response to the complaints raised by Colten's family, saying the matter is before the courts.

"These reports are concerning to us," Saskatchewan RCMP said in a written statement. "Full details will be released through court proceedings and we encourage the public and media agencies who wish to learn the circumstances to follow the court process."

Ms. Baptiste's son William said he knows they were searching the home because he had shut Colten's pet Chihuahua, Chico, in the closet, planning to jokingly tell Colten that his dog had run off because he'd been gone too long. When the officers entered the back room Chico, now free, ran into the living room.

After a few minutes an officer tried to force a weeping Ms. Baptiste to her feet.

"He grabbed my wrist right here and he said 'Ma'am, get yourself together.' And I told him, 'No,'" Ms. Baptiste recalled.


She was in denial, begging the officer to take her to the body so she could prove it wasn't her son: "You've got the wrong person. That's not my son lying out there. He's not dead. That's not Colten. It's somebody else," she told him.

He responded by asking if she was drunk.

"He said, 'Ma'am, was you drinking?' And I said 'No.' And then he smelled my breath," she said.

At her most desperate hour she recoiled. She felt insulted, hurt, confused. She hadn't been drinking. Why would they ask that?

William and his brother Jace Baptiste said the officers also asked if they'd been drinking. They hadn't. They were waiting for Colten to return home. They even had his dinner ready in the microwave, they told the police. An officer walked over and opened the microwave to check if this was true, an act so presumptuous Ms. Baptiste and her sons dwell on it every time they tell the story of that night. Would the officer have acted the same way in the home of a white family that had just been notified of their son's murder? Ms. Baptiste doesn't think so.

Tash and Marie Baptiste, relatives who had watched in alarm as the convoy of police vehicles swept in, were initially blocked from joining their family inside. They were eventually allowed in, and their accounts match those of Ms. Baptiste and her sons. They counted roughly a dozen officers inside and outside and at least six police vehicles surrounding the trailer. Police were searching the home and surrounding area and some had guns drawn. Tash and Marie said they gathered the two young children to shield them from the chaos.

"They were going in and out of those bedrooms," Tash Baptiste said. She remembers vividly that William's three-year-old son J.J. was wide-eyed with fear.

"That kid wouldn't let me go," she said. "He was shaking like he was traumatized. He didn't know what was going on."

Jace said the officers were inside the house for about 20 minutes. When Jace asked why they were searching, the officers told him they were looking for Cassidy Whitstone, who had been with Colten earlier that day.

"The first thought that came into my mind was "What did we do? Why are all these officers on us?," Ms. Baptiste said. "My son was the victim. But I thought that we did something wrong."

jellybean

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Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #33 on: February 11, 2018, 06:28:58 PM »
I read that too, and I thought "how cruel and insensitive".  There is no excuse for treating Colten's mother that way.  It should have been handled with some sense of dignity. No one was drinking in the home and that shows what the RCMP believes about Aboriginals in general.... Smelling their breath was so ignorant.... Oh I am sure they would say, that it is dangerous being in a home when drinking is involved, blah, blah..... however......and what could we say about that?  They would have us over a barrel, saying, well you would be surprised how they can turn on you and be dangerous when they are drinking, so we asked them "Have you been drinking" 
What could we say to that?

RCMP become "Reserve Weary"  Perhaps they spend a lot of time out there, looking for someone.
 If only they had placed Ms. Bouchie in the squad car, or taken her to the back room and gently give her the terrible news there,  and to have the Chief of the Reserve come to the Boushie home, after the police had checked the Boushie place  for persons with firearms, to take her and the kids to his home to care for her, it might have been different.

They can check that darn microwave for Colton's supper, and look for further firearms after Ms. Boushie was removed.

As to the cop cars and police with handguns drawn........ The incidents [there were two] involved firearms, and two of the perps escaped, so they had to go to CB's home to look for them. Might well have been that the two were known to the RCMP.

Of course,  they would not take any chances in case there was a shoot out.  I told myself, that is how they are trained, and that is how they work. They cannot take chances.

That 20 minutes in the trailer could have been better spent by removing the kids and Ms. Bouschie from the home - first!!

I am not white washing their behaviour..... some sensitivity was warranted here.  They were ignorant and cruel.   No excuses, but I do understand the cars, officers and guns drawn......sadly.
How Ms. Bouschie was told and the manner in which they treated her is sickening, and they owe this grieving mother  a public apology.

jb

« Last Edit: February 11, 2018, 10:16:59 PM by jellybean »

jellybean

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Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #34 on: February 11, 2018, 11:21:45 PM »
I found this -  I cannot snip it for obvious reasons /jb

https://saskatoon.ctvnews.ca/from-day-one-a-timeline-of-gerald-stanley-s-trial-1.3798399

From day one: A timeline of Gerald Stanley?s trial

Jan. 29
About 200 people show up in Battleford for jury duty.
Seven women and five men ? plus two alternates ? are selected to serve.
None are visibly Indigenous, prompting comments of frustration from Boushie?s family.
?It was really difficult to sit there today and watch every single visible Indigenous person be challenged by the defence,? his cousin, Jade Tootoosis, tells media.

Jan. 30
Chief Justice Martel Popescul, who presided over the trial, starts the day by notifying court the two alternates selected the previous day will be filling for two jurors he says he excused.
Prosecutor Bill Burge then opens the Crown?s case.
He outlines details of Boushie?s death, stating the 22-year-old was shot once in an SUV on the Stanley farm Aug. 9, 2016.
The bullet entered behind his left ear and exited through the side of his neck.
Three spent casings found at the scene match a Tokarev handgun from Stanley?s home, Burge says. Eleven guns ? two of which were pellet guns ? were found on the property.
Boushie?s DNA was on the Tokarev, Burge says. Gunshot residue was on Stanley?s hands.
Burge promises testimony from Stanley?s son and calls two RCMP officers.
The first officer, Cpl. Terry Heroux, shows photos from the scene and outlines the investigative process.
Court hears the SUV, with its door open, was left at the scene for two days. Forty-four millimetres of rain came down in the area within that time and much of Boushie?s blood in the SUV washed away.
The second officer, a blood-stain-pattern analyst, is Sgt. Jennifer Barnes.
Stanley?s defence lawyer, Scott Spencer, questions the police investigation, stating the defence was not able to see the SUV before the vehicle was towed from the scene.

Jan. 31
Const. Andrew Park tells court he believes a rifle stock found at a farm northeast of the Stanley property matches a stock missing from a rifle found at the scene.
He says he received a report, while on the Stanley farm, of an attempted break-in to a truck on the other property.
Stanley?s son, Sheldon, then takes the stand.
Sheldon testifies hearing someone start a quad in their yard, after an SUV drove onto the farm.
He says he believes someone from the SUV was trying to steal from the property.
He hit the SUV?s windshield with a hammer as the vehicle tried to drive away, and then went to the house to grab truck keys, he says.
He tells court he heard three shots before seeing his dad, standing close to the SUV, holding a gun and a clip.
?I don?t know what happened. It just went off. I just wanted to scare them,? Stanley said, according to his son.
A rifle, missing a stock, fell out of the SUV when two women who were in the vehicle pull Boushie?s body out, Sheldon says.
He testifies he then called 911.
Eric Meechance, who was with Boushie and three others the day of the shooting, tells court the group had spent the day target shooting, drinking Crown Royal and swimming in a river in the area.
The five were on a nearby farm before they drove onto the Stanley property, he testifies.
He says one of the five tried to break into a red truck on the other farm using a rifle, but is adamant the group did not enter the Stanley yard to steal.
He takes issue with Stanley?s lawyer describing the group as armed.
?I wouldn?t say armed,? Meechance says. ?That gun wasn?t whipped out anytime on that farm.?
The 23-year-old says he and another person flee after the SUV hits a parked vehicle.
He heard two gunshots while running away, he says.

Feb. 1
Cassidy Cross, who was also with Boushie, admits in court to lying in previous statements.
He testifies he broke a rifle trying to break into a truck on a different farm the same day, but says he drove the SUV onto the Stanley property only to seek help with a flat tire.
He recalls someone hitting the SUV?s windshield with a hammer and the vehicle striking another vehicle on the Stanley farm, before he and Meechance fled.
?We didn't think about it. We just ran. I was scared out of my mind," Cross says.
Belinda Jackson, who was in the SUV?s backseat when Boushie was killed, also admits to telling RCMP a different story but testifies she saw Stanley shoot Boushie in the head.
She tells court she heard someone say, ?Go get a gun,? about a minute before the fatal shooting.
She also says she saw a ?younger man? on the property go into the house prior to the shooting, while another man walked into a garage and grabbed a handgun.
The man who grabbed the handgun, who she later identified as Stanley, shot Boushie, she testifies.
The other man was holding what she believed was a shotgun when he exited the home, she says.
Forensic firearms expert Greg Williams begins his testimony, stating he found ?an unusual bulge? in a cartridge found on the SUV?s dash.
The cartridge is one of the three spent casings matched to Stanley?s Tokarev handgun.
He?s ultimately unsure what created the bulge, but notes a hang fire ? a delay between when the trigger is pulled and when the bullet fires ? alone wouldn?t cause the abnormal casing.
Hang fires are rare, he says.
The Tokarev handgun fired normally when tested, he also states.

Feb. 2
Williams? testimony continues.
He tells court he tested 36 cartridges from 80 seized from the Stanley farm. One of the tested cartridges failed to fire, he says.
The Crown?s case closes.
John Ervin, a gun and ammunition expert, is called to the stand as the defence?s first witness.
He also testifies the Tokarev fired fine when tested, but he blames the bulged cartridge on a misaligned gun.
He says he couldn?t determine if the handgun hang fired or not.

Feb. 5
Spencer, Stanley?s defence lawyer, delivers his opening statement.
He calls the shooting a ?freak accident? and blames a hang fire.
His first witness of the day, Kim Worthington, the executive director of Saskatoon Youth for Christ, tells court he saw an SUV that was in bad shape the day of the shooting.
The next witness, Wayne Popowich, who contacted Spencer after seeing media coverage of the trial, tells court he?s experienced hang fires with delays between seven and 12 seconds.
He also testifies he?s experienced a hang fire that created a bulge, but says during cross-examination, that specific incident happened 40 years ago.
Another witness, Nathan Voinorosky, testifies he?s experienced a seven-second hang fire while target shooting.
Glennis Fouhy, from the farm the Boushie group was on before they drove to the Stanley property, also testifies.
Stanley is then called to the stand in his own defence. He?s the last witness to testify in the trial.
He outlines seeing the SUV drive onto the property and hearing someone start an ATV.
He describes his son hitting the windshield with a hammer and himself kicking the taillight.
He tells court he thought the SUV was leaving until it hit his wife?s parked vehicle.
He says he grabs the Tokarev handgun from his shop with the intent to scare the group away.
He recalls two men running from the scene after he fired what he says were warning shots straight into the air, but says he was in ?pure terror? because he thought his wife had been hit by the SUV.
He tells court he removed the gun?s magazine after firing the warning shots. The gun, in his right hand, fired when he reached into the SUV to turn off the vehicle with his left hand, he says.
?It just went off,? court hears.
He claims his finger wasn?t on the trigger.
Crown prosecutor Bill Burge then cross-examines Stanley, asking how many guns were in the home and about Stanley?s knowledge of gun handling.
?Did you learn not to point a gun at somebody?? Burge asks.
?Did you learn that if you pull a trigger that doesn?t go off you better treat this gun as something dangerous that might go off??
He also asks Stanley if he normally knows how many shells he loads into a clip.
Stanley replies he does on most days but now knows he was mistaken when he thought he loaded two bullets the day Boushie was shot.
The defence?s case closes.

Feb. 8
Both lawyers share their closing arguments.
Defence lawyer Scott Spencer begins, reiterating his argument the fatal shot was the result of a hang fire.
He describes the situation Stanley was in as a ?nightmare? and argues no evidence exists showing Stanley pulled the trigger.
?It?s a tragedy, but not criminal,? he tells court. "Some people aren't going to be happy. You have to do what is right based on the evidence you heard in this courtroom. You must acquit."

Crown prosecutor Bill Burge then delivers his closing statement.
Burge disputes the gun hang fired, pointing to the evidence presented by both gun experts, and disputes Stanley?s claim he thought the gun was empty.
?He's told you something that is demonstrably not true because there was another round in that clip,? Burge says.
He also argues Stanley handled the Tokarev carelessly, and points to parts of Stanley?s and Sheldon?s testimonies he says didn?t match.
Stanley said he ran to the SUV, while Sheldon testified he saw his father walk by the SUV, Burge says.

Jurors begin deliberations, after instructions from the judge.
The jury is given three options, according to Popescul: that Stanley is guilty of second-degree murder, that Stanley is guilty of manslaughter or that Stanley be acquitted.

Feb. 9
Jurors re-hear the full testimonies of Stanley and his son, during the morning and afternoon, before continuing deliberations.

A verdict is delivered at 7:30 p.m.
The courtroom is filled with members of Boushie?s family, the public and the media anxiously awaiting the reading.

Stanley is found not guilty.

Cries, shouts, gasps and swears are heard in court.
Some people yell, ?Murderer!? Others appear to be in disbelief.
Stanley is rushed out a side door by RCMP officers.

Boushie?s family members, their lawyer and several others comment outside court.
The family?s lawyer, Chris Murphy, asks people to imagine being ?in the skin? of Boushie?s mother, brothers and cousin following the death and during the investigative and legal processes.
Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations Vice-Chief Kimberly Jonathan points to residential schools and the ?60s Scoop in her comments on the verdict.
?We felt unsafe then, and we?re still unsafe. Someone can say it?s an accident to shoot any one of us, and they?re found not guilty,? she says.
Boushie?s cousin, Tootoosis, promises the family will fight for an appeal.
?We will not stop our pursuit for justice,? she says.
--- Video by Ed Sedgwick. Writing by Kevin Menz, with files from Angelina Irinici and The Canadian Press





 





Sap1

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Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #35 on: February 12, 2018, 12:19:57 AM »
Quoting a snip from JB:

Quote
As to the cop cars and police with handguns drawn........ The incidents [there were two] involved firearms, and two of the perps escaped, so they had to go to CB's home to look for them. Might well have been that the two were known to the RCMP.

Ok, I had forgotten that part. I knew that some took off running when the gunfire began but didn't think they got too far and police detained them near the farm.
Still ... Ms. Bouchie was treated badly. She was not a villain. Now I understand why her brother shook the eagle feather in court.

Sap1

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Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #36 on: February 12, 2018, 04:26:43 AM »
Quote
Seven women and five men ? plus two alternates ? are selected to serve.
None are visibly Indigenous, prompting comments of frustration from Boushie?s family.
?It was really difficult to sit there today and watch every single visible Indigenous person be challenged by the defence,? his cousin, Jade Tootoosis, tells media.

I would think that relatives and anyone from the reserve would not be chosen as jurors because they had already made up their minds on guilt before the trial began. That is one of the questions prospective jurors have to answer iirc.


Quote
The first officer, Cpl. Terry Heroux, shows photos from the scene and outlines the investigative process.
Court hears the SUV, with its door open, was left at the scene for two days. Forty-four millimetres of rain came down in the area within that time and much of Boushie?s blood in the SUV washed away.
The second officer, a blood-stain-pattern analyst, is Sgt. Jennifer Barnes.
Stanley?s defence lawyer, Scott Spencer, questions the police investigation, stating the defence was not able to see the SUV before the vehicle was towed from the scene.

Crime scene investigation was really shoddy.

capeheart

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Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #37 on: February 12, 2018, 01:52:33 PM »
Jellybean, thanks for the description of what happened on that particular day of the tragic event that brings us all to this discussion. I wasn't aware there were females involved in this, I just thought it was all male persons that were involved. I have a clearer picture of what happened and the more I hear, the more I think it was a bad day for everyone involved, no good ending for anybody. Also there was a gun involved with the parties earlier on, that had been broken. So there was a lot of things going on there, more people could have been harmed then were, actually. The Boushie family is having a meeting in Ottawa, so I am sure they will get some things resolved that they have issues with. Peace to everyone involved. We do not know what the RCMP had in mind when they went to the home. If they were searching for someone or they may have had issues there before. Day after day we see officers killed in the line of duty, ambushed and trying to carry out their duties.  The officers could have had a priest or someone come with them to tell the mom that her son was deceased.  They actually as you say, could have taken her outside to the vehicle to tell her what happened. Sensitivity surely could have been used in this situation.  :o :o :o :o

Sap1

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Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #38 on: February 12, 2018, 05:48:37 PM »
My heart is truly with those grieving but all this suffering could have been prevented long ago.

Young people need to find another pastime on weekends or days off. Swimming is great, but not also polishing off a bottle of crown royal and then driving through farm country with a shotgun in the car, and not stopping in at farms breaking into trucks etc. 
I hope this tragedy has been a lesson to those who were involved and they don't just rely on Ottawa to change rules for justice, thinking they did nothing wrong. They were all in the wrong and their friend died because of it.   

jellybean

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Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #39 on: February 12, 2018, 05:52:18 PM »
http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/boushie-verdict-ottawa-parliament-meeting-1.4530880

'We feel a bit more hopeful': Boushie family in Ottawa to meet with ministers
Relatives of Colten Boushie want changes to justice system after Gerald Stanley found not guilty in his death
By Catharine Tunney, Marc-Andr? Cossette, CBC News Posted: Feb 11, 2018 4:14 PM ET Last Updated: Feb 12, 2018 4:24 PM ET

Colten Boushie's family members say they feel more hopeful following meetings with federal ministers Monday, after a not-guilty verdict in his shooting death sent shock waves throughout Canada.

"This is only the beginning of the conversation and calls to action," said Boushie's cousin, Jade Tootoosis.
"We have little to no faith in the justice system and we're here to talk about that."
Tootoosis flew to Ottawa late Sunday night with Boushie's mother, Debbie Baptiste, and his uncle Alvin Baptiste, two days after Saskatchewan farmer Gerald Stanley was found not guilty of second-degree murder.

Family lawyer Chris Murphy said a meeting with Carolyn Bennett, minister of Indigenous-Crown Affairs, lasted for more than two hours Monday morning. A subsequent meeting with Indigenous Services Minister Jane Philpott lasted 45 minutes.

Ministers say Canada must 'do better' after Boushie verdict
Video showing jury delivering Gerald Stanley verdict taken down from Facebook

The two ministers said their meetings were about listening and expressing condolences.
"They are standing strong," said Philpott. "Our goal was to listen to them, to hear their perspective. They've been through incredibly troubling times in the 18 months since this young man was killed and we wanted to hear their concerns."

Murphy said the trip has been about building relationships with politicians and officials on Parliament Hill ? not asking for an appeal.
"There's no way that relationships across this country are going to change unless there's empathy on both sides," he said.

and ----

Speaking to reporters Monday, Boushie's mother wore a #justiceforcolten T-shirt. She said that, for her, those words demand a change in the way Canada, and its justice system, treat Indigenous people.
"Somehow, Canada could come together, all its people could come together, and realize we're all human beings," she said.

jellybean

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Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #40 on: February 12, 2018, 06:02:37 PM »
My heart is truly with those grieving but all this suffering could have been prevented long ago.

Young people need to find another pastime on weekends or days off. Swimming is great, but not also polishing off a bottle of crown royal and then driving through farm country with a shotgun in the car, and not stopping in at farms breaking into trucks etc. 
I hope this tragedy has been a lesson to those who were involved and they don't just rely on Ottawa to change rules for justice, thinking they did nothing wrong. They were all in the wrong and their friend died because of it.   

I agree with you very much sap1.

I am undecided as to whether to believe Mr. Stanley, I was not there for the trial, so it is left "hanging in the air" with me as to  guilt or innocent. or whether the trial was fair. I stand behind changes to the system to include aboriginals in juries, and to have aboriginal judges.

The farmers had been terrorized in that area for months.  Something terrible was going to happen that day ..... alcohol, drunk driving, attempting theft.

What and the heck were these young people thinking?  They had no respect for other people's land nor their belongings.  The brazen attempt to go onto 2 farms and to steal.
And in broad daylight... non the less.

I ask myself this question.  If they had been successful would they have stopped? Another farm, another day?

Asian, white, black or native - should not make a difference.

Coulton did not deserve to die, that is for certain. What a horrible price he paid.
Sadly, everyone lost that day and both sides' indigenous, and whites  are entrenched in the belief that their side is right. The problem lies with "the other guy" not them. 

jb
« Last Edit: February 12, 2018, 06:24:33 PM by jellybean »

Sap1

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Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #41 on: February 12, 2018, 06:38:48 PM »
ITA JB. You said it better than I could have. No matter the color, creed or race ... one very just justice for all. All treated equally.

jellybean

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Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #42 on: February 12, 2018, 09:22:42 PM »
https://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/canada/gofundme-page-for-gerald-stanley-draws-fury-amid-protests-calls-for-appeal/ar-BBJ2YF0?li=AAggFp5&item=personalization_enabled:false&OCID=ans

GoFundMe page for Gerald Stanley draws fury amid protests, calls for appeal

snipped

A fundraiser created to help Gerald Stanley recover his legal fees has prompted fury online, with many calling for GoFundMe to remove the page entirely.

The page reads that money raised will go to renovating Stanley's farm, repairing vehicles and paying off legal fees.
Twitter users spoke out saying they were "disgusted" and "deeply disappointed" by the website's decision to host the fundraiser.

"This organization does so much good, but I'll never see it the same way again," one Twitter user named Jean Knowles said of GoFundMe.

Others warned that several donations were made using racist pseudonyms, as well as under the names "Justin Trudeau" and "Sophie Gregoire Trudeau."

Not only are people donating to Gerald Stanley's gofundme, they are donating under the names of people who support Colten Boushie and under racist names like "chief red". @gofundme and @robsolomon1 still won't take it down though. Vile, racist, evil and so very Canadian.
? Sentient garbage bag/Law student (@sweatpantsrani) February 12, 2018

The online fundraiser was created by Sam Olsen of Maple Creek, Sask., on behalf of the Stanley family on Feb. 9.

While it's unclear how Olsen is acquainted with the family, GoFundMe confirmed to Global News in an email that the page is verified.

The statement explained that GoFundMe will not remove the page, which had collected $84,000 of its $100,000 goal by Monday afternoon.

"Given the jury verdict, this campaign does not violate our terms of service," spokeswoman Rachel Hollis said.

While GoFundMe said the page does not violate its policy, a petition on change.org is calling for the website to remove it.
The petition, created by Cassandra Miles of Issaquah, Wash., had received about 400 signatures by Monday afternoon.

"This is a slap in the face to The Boushie/Baptiste Family, First Nations People," the petition said of the fundraiser.

"Go Fund Me should take the platform down, refund every bit of that money or divert it to anti-hate crime causes, and issue a public apology IMMEDIATELY."


« Last Edit: February 12, 2018, 09:50:49 PM by jellybean »

Sap1

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Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #43 on: February 13, 2018, 02:25:52 PM »
https://www.gofundme.com/justice4colten

Excerpt:

We believe that Indigenous youth deserve safety and the ability to travel freely on these lands without fear of racism or persecution. We are not trespassers.

jellybean

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Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
« Reply #44 on: February 13, 2018, 03:06:02 PM »
Quote
In August 2016, Colten was shot and killed on a farm while out for a drive with his friends.

Wow, out for a drive with his friends? Totally laughable! 
People reading this fake news will believe it, if they have not followed the events in the paper, tv or radio.  Seems to be a few of them around who have not.

jb
« Last Edit: February 13, 2018, 03:16:54 PM by jellybean »