Author Topic: MMIW Inquiry 20160803  (Read 9615 times)

Sap1

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Sap1

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Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
« Reply #1 on: August 07, 2016, 06:20:39 PM »
Okay, this article is different from the one above, however in my opinion cases like this should be looked at while doing the Inquiry.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatchewan/indian-posse-richard-wolfe-death-prison-1.3606065

and a tragic, disadvantaged childhood where one of his earliest experiences was of being locked in a storage room at elementary school for misbehaving.

'Sexual abuse left Richard confused, ashamed and full of hate.'
- Saskatchewan Court of Queen's Bench sentencing decision
Wolfe, who founded the Indian Posse street gang with his brother, died after being found in need of medical attention in the exercise yard of the Saskatchewan prison.

The Correctional Service of Canada said Wolfe, 40, was taken to hospital where he was pronounced dead Friday night. A news release from the agency said the circumstances of the incident were being investigated, but offered no further details on what happened. Calls to the service were not returned.

Richard Daniel Wolfe, notorious Indian Posse gang founder, dies in prison

Wolfe is the older brother of Daniel Wolfe, who was killed during a brawl at the same prison on Jan. 4, 2010, while the younger man was serving time for a double murder.

Richard Wolfe
Richard Daniel Wolfe, a founder of the Indian Posse gang, died Friday while an inmate at the Prince Albert Penitentiary in Saskatchewan. (RCMP)

According to a 1994 article by the Winnipeg Free Press, the brothers founded the Indian Posse gang in 1989 in the basement of their mother's Winnipeg home. Richard would have been about 13 at the time and had just started on what would become a lifetime of interactions with the criminal justice system.

Court documents show Wolfe had a string of breaking and entering convictions as a youth and spent a lot of his teen years in and out of youth custody facilities.

"He was raised in an environment where substance abuse and domestic violence was prevalent," a sentencing judge wrote in January of this year. "Richard was repeatedly exposed to violence which occurred during his parents' house parties. He was sexually abused at the age of seven, once by a stranger and twice by a neighbour. The episodes of sexual abuse left Richard confused, ashamed and full of hate."

Brothers lived in poverty

Sap1

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Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
« Reply #2 on: August 22, 2016, 04:35:52 PM »
So far we have mostly heard one voice --- those crying victim, and blaming. We need to hear the other voices, like those in the following article ... those that were thankful for the education received which enabled them to find employment.
Interesting older article from 2014. Let us finally hear all voices then, rather than just one collective negative voice since the inquiry is going ahead to the tune of over 80,000 million, thanks to all taxpayers. Since we have no choice, I for one, want to hear all the truths, not just the blaming of the white peoples.

http://news.nationalpost.com/full-comment/paul-russell-could-it-be-that-residential-schools-werent-so-badThe National Post has carried many stories about these schools before and since that apology. And every time we do, it is interesting to see that most of the letters we receive argue that the schools have been unfairly portrayed in the media.







A few more notes came in after that, each echoing that same point. Here is one example.



Did you or a family member attend a residential school? In 250 words or fewer, tell us about your experience, good or bad, at letters@nationalpost.com.

National Post

prussell@nationalpost.com

debbiec

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Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
« Reply #3 on: August 22, 2016, 04:50:46 PM »
Quote
So far we have mostly heard one voice --- those crying victim, and blaming. We need to hear the other voices, like those in the following article ... those that were thankful for the education received which enabled them to find employment.
Interesting older article from 2014. Let us finally hear all voices then, rather than just one collective negative voice since the inquiry is going ahead to the tune of over 80,000 million, thanks to all taxpayers. Since we have no choice, I for one, want to hear all the truths, not just the blaming of the white peoples.


I totally agree with your comment Sap1. Just reading this one article helps put some things in perspective a little.

jellybean

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Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
« Reply #4 on: August 22, 2016, 06:47:05 PM »
I totally agree.  We are running around with a guilt complex, because we have been blamed for all of the conditions harming our aboriginal communities.

I am certainly one who wants to see their standard of living raised, as do most of us, but I am tired of the impression left, that this all of our making. That every unfortunate thing that happens to them is our fault.

In my opinion their is plenty of blame to go around - including  aboriginals themselves.

Many aboriginals are Dr's, lawyers, etc. and we never hear about that. It would be great if they mentored their own people, to show them that many things are possible. And if they are doing so, then at least let the general public know that successful natives are reaching out to their own people.  At the very least, they owe them that much.

jb

2soccermom

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Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
« Reply #5 on: August 22, 2016, 07:19:29 PM »
For my part, I don't think the issue is too much reporting. I see a significant part of the problem is that First Nations history is so seldom taught (or taught well) in the Canadian education system; this is because few of the teachers trained have experience and knowledge in this history themselves and so the cycle simply repeats itself.  As just one example: I really wonder how many Canadians know about the Indian Act, and sections 12(1)b, C-31, and now C-3 which has ongoing implications for Indigenous women and their communities? It took the United Nations Committee on Human Rights to decide in 1981 or 1982 that Canada was in extreme violation of its human rights commitment in continued structural discrimination (in C-31; this is legislation that discriminated against status women who "married out" to, say, non-status men, as opposed to non-status women who "married in"; this is because Canadian law upheld the idea that status women follow the conditions of their husbands and fathers! And the Supreme Court, as Canada's highest law, refused to see the concomitant racism and sexism of that legislation; it took an international body to rule that, out of the very brave insistence of Indigenous women not to back down despite the force of the law) -- with critical implications for missing and murdered women because status women who married out HAD to leave reserve, lost their right to property there, and connections to their cultural community; if the marriage dissolved, they legally remained dispossessed! (And so much more) -- and there is a new appeal to the UNCHR for its successor legislation, even if the current C-3 has different implications and effects than C-31. So I understand how people may feel media is saturated recently with particular repeated kinds of reports but on the other hand I quite regularly find in my travels folks with LOTS of opinions on, say, treaties and land rights, language, structural and interpersonal discrimination and broader Indigenous rights with very little actual knowledge or education on the context and history of the issues they feel -- and speak! -- so passionately about. I'm all for diverse and plentiful discussion on this -- indeed, the Royal Commission's report exhorts Canadians AND its education system to engage these very things! But I think the larger body of knowledge into which MMIW is plugged is the conversation that is most glaringly missing in popular understanding. I understand how people might feel thet are getting a LOT of info now and with one kind of focus -- I agree we meed much much more to hear and learn. So I'm glad for this thread -- thank you for starting it, SAP. And I think it was ahhhh-mazing for Gord Downie to take time out of his epic last concert to speak to First Nations issues! Makes me more than ever proud to be both Canadian AND a Hip fan!
(And, by the way: I'm so hopeful for new teachers and new learning today, and grateful to those teachers and students who have worked on their own in their past to actually *learn* Indigenous history and epistemology)

Sap1

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Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
« Reply #6 on: August 22, 2016, 08:00:36 PM »
You are definitely well versed, Soccermom. I think too that Indigenous history needs to be taught in schools, however not just one sided.

In my medical training we had an Indigenous speaker ... this is many years ago ... he had studied Psychology and one thing he told us was that once he left the reserve he was no longer welcome back because he had studied white man's schooling. His intentions were to go back and help his own people but they didn't want him back and didn't want his help.


2soccermom

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Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
« Reply #7 on: August 22, 2016, 08:10:32 PM »
I'm not sure how long ago it was that your speaker was not welcome back to reserve but there are legal implications and longstanding colonial legacies that I see at work here and, again, many Canadians have little understanding or knowlege of Canada's legal histories of violence against Indigenous Canadians. For example: it was law under the IA for status "Indians" to be forcibly disenfranchised: "it was automatic if an Indian became a doctor, lawyer, Christian minister, or earned a university degree"  -- which means that Canadian law refused those folks the right to reside in reserve. (There are MUCH better sources that address this history written from Indigenous perspectives by Indigenous people, but I am citing a fed gov source http://www.lop.parl.gc.ca/content/lop/researchpublications/bp410-e.htm). In a nutshell: people who had elite professional training in the Canadian system **were not allowed to return to reserve under Canadian law** and there are longstanding effects of this law in Indigenous communities. Its really quite interesting to learn about legal and political history in this country in ways that expand what most of us get in the traditional telling of history.

2soccermom

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Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
« Reply #8 on: August 22, 2016, 08:16:27 PM »
I also appreciate how people may see Indigenous-centred history as "one-sided" but I strongly believe this is still an effect of colonial and neo-colonial training, because we have already been given one-sided history from the colonizers' perspectives throughout most of our formal training in the Canadian education system  and it has become so natural to us we don't recognize it FOR its very familiarity. I don't mean this to sound judgmental at all or like a lecture -- I'm not exempt from these histories either. I'm complicit too. I cited the gov source because some people say Indigenous perspectives are biased -- as if government sources aren't biased also! EVERYTHING comes from its own locations and investments, right? Me too :)
I agree that we need balanced reporting but that balance will take a LOT of Indigenous-centred  history written by Indigenous peoples and their allies to even begin the tilting process, as the Royal Commission's Report identified so strongly.
« Last Edit: August 22, 2016, 08:23:59 PM by 2soccermom »

2soccermom

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Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
« Reply #9 on: August 22, 2016, 08:41:13 PM »
and this last post is a bit of an apology: I certainly don't mean to diss the gov source I cited and which I quite like but it occurs to me belatedly that it is *quite* problematic on my part to make assumptions about the identity locations of the writers who actually submitted the report. The brief is good -- I really meant to address the limitations of the *genre* of gov't-styled and/or solicited research :) (and even so that intention has its issues). lol, sigh: I was thinking and typing on the fly, when I know more measured response is always good :)

jellybean

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Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
« Reply #10 on: August 22, 2016, 09:18:06 PM »
The present government is working to set things right. The problem is very complex, and generations of natives have lived in abject poverty and disenfranchised from society.
It will take more than money to fix it.

It will also take the continued  cooperation  of natives  - to  create positive results within their communities.

It can be very discouraging at times - as no two bands are alike - and it is difficult to get them to agree in amongst themselves on the path going forward.

Proper housing, schools and medical facilities are less than third world on some of  the northern native reserves.  The taxpayers will have to set it right.
And the government should move quickly. No hand holding - and sympathizing with their plight.  Just get it done!

I agree that many treaties have held natives back, and yet, it is the first thing that they recite and uphold when they are displeased.

Aboriginal studies should be taught in school.  It is part of our Canadian fabric, and we should know it. Obviously, I do not know it, and it shows.

Like most Canadians, when it comes to aboriginals, I can only go by my own experiences.  I have known many well grounded natives, who sadly, had to leave the reserve, to make something out of their lives.
They kept an open mind, were eager to learn and to work - to work darn hard and made it.

I also see, many, who struggle and lack the most basic of skills, who sadly end up on skid row, along side whites - I might add. They are people first and it is heartbreaking.

I have high hopes for change through the AFN organization. The present leader Perry Bellegarde is an exceptional human being, an articulate spokesperson for the plight of his people, a calm and persistent negotiator with the government, and will create change if given the chance. He has caught the attention of all Canadians!!

But, we will see - if this time - there is less in-fighting and power struggles from the chiefs  by way of  more cooperation than given to their AFN leaders in the past.

http://www.afn.ca/Assembly_of_First_Nations.htm

jb
« Last Edit: August 22, 2016, 09:53:09 PM by jellybean »

Sap1

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Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
« Reply #11 on: August 23, 2016, 07:29:24 AM »
I'm placing a recent article here for review and for re-orientation for all of us in regards the Indian Act, etc. Some things are coming back to me from lectures regarding FN peoples from my studies in the healthcare sector when my training was at a then federal hospital primarily for FN peoples, however I need to refresh myself also.

At first glance on the article I see problems that were not just so for aboriginals placed on reserves as far as restrictions go. Government also did this to newcomers from other countries. I know countless families whose names were changed, my fathers included. Other restrictions applied to newcomers as well depending from which country the newcomer was from.

For my part I never could see why FN were placed on "reserves" b/c I believe all people can live together in large or small communities in towns and cities, in the country, etc and all benefit from each other as equals.

You will need to click on the link as some of the links within do not transfer.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/aboriginal/21-things-you-may-not-know-about-the-indian-act-1.3533613

jellybean

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Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
« Reply #12 on: August 23, 2016, 07:19:09 PM »
Soccermom2: No need to apologize, what so ever! You spoke the truth, and with clarity.

Yes, our views are one sided. We are just beginning to listen.... and to attempt to set the "wrongs" right. 

However, I am afraid that some demands are getting out of hand.  They are in the billions of dollars, of which we, as a country do not have.

That is the reality.

 I cannot be held hostage to my ancestors decisions. I had no part in it.

At present there is another group of aboriginals who are suing the federal govt for 1.2 billion dollars because from the early 60s through to the 80's children were removed from their families and either placed up for adoption or placed in foster homes.  One woman claims that she did not learn her language and therefore cannot communicate with her mother.
$85,000 per child is the tab.

Now for argument purposes, let us take a child from a bad home where English is spoken, and the child is placed with a french family.  Should they sue because they cannot speak their mother's tongue?

It can and is getting out of hand.  imo
What is good for the goose, is good for the gander?
Good clean warm housing, proper education and good health facilities, affordable food is urgently required on some reserves.  This will also be in the in the billions.
That - I will buy into.

Not knowing their mother tongue (many natives don't by the way) for $85,000 I will never buy into.  Native language classes are offered throughout our educational system.
If they were physically abused in foster homes, then that is a different story.
They have every right to sue the agency that placed them there.

The Indian Act should be abolished. And get rid of the strangle hold of Indian Affairs.
If the land is owned by a tribe - they should have the right to parcel it out and allow private property ownership to their own people. Perhaps this is already taking place on some reserves.  I don't know.


jb

« Last Edit: August 23, 2016, 08:39:24 PM by jellybean »

jellybean

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Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
« Reply #13 on: August 23, 2016, 08:52:15 PM »
They have  a huge ageda going forward.  I have bolded a few.
http://www.afn.ca/uploads/files/2016_aga_resolutions_1-69_fe2.pdf.pdf


# Title
01 Support for First Nations Youth Life Promotion Calls to Action
02 Support for the Montreal Lake Cree Nation Emergency Response Search and Rescue Team Proposal
03 Support for the Registered Disability Savings Plan
04 Declaration of November as Indigenous Disability Awareness Month
05 Support for Indigenous Disability and Wellness Gathering
06 Call to Action that Health Canada Non-Insured Health Benefits list provide a new treatment for type 2 Diabetes called
Jardiance
07 Supporting Partnerships with Indigenous Health Organizations
08 Increased and enhanced flexibility of mental wellness funding to First Nation communities
09 Support for Community-based Health Surveillance Systems
10 Support for a Primary Health Care Centre (Hospital) in Island Lake Manitoba
11 Support for Engagement in the Health Accord Discussions
12 Moving Beyond Federal Legislation To Establish a Nation-To-Nation Relationship

13 Calling for a National Reconciliation Process & Implementing the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples
Recommendations
14 Support for the World Indigenous Peoples Conference on Education 2017
15 Support for Indigenous Ways of Knowing at the Canada Wide Science Festival
16 Honourable Process to Develop Recommendations to support First Nations Education Reform
17 Call on Canada to update the Additions to Reserve Policy (ATR)
18 Support for Atlantic Salmon Emergency Critical Habitat Order
19 Fish-WIKS Fisheries Western and Indigenous Knowledge Systems
20 Long Term Sustainability of Kashechewan (Albany) First Nation Reserve # 67

(LiUNA)
22 Reaffirmation of the Chiefs Committee on Human Resources Development
23 Support for the National Indian Football Association Canada
24 Support for Acting on Climate Change Indigenous Initiatives Project
25 Support for Grassy Narrows and Other Mercury Impacted Communities
26 Support For Bill S-215 An Act To Amend The Criminal Code (Sentencing For Violent Offenses Against Aboriginal Women)
27 Support for the concept of inherent and Treaty rights card36 Inherent and Treaty Right to Post-Secondary Education
37 Establishing a Crown-First Nations Process on Land, Peoples and Governance

38 Protection and Promotion of Free Prior informed Consent of Indigenous Rights holders
39 First Nations National Working Group on Early Learning and Child Care (ELCC)
# Title
40 Call on Canada to address the backlog for eligible First Nation post-secondary students
41 Nechi Institute - Centre of Indigenous Learning
42 International Child Custody
43 Support for rescinding CMHC Request for Proposal for technical services on reserve
44 First Nations, Forests, and Climate change in BC
45 National Water Conservation and Protection Strategy for The Great Lakes
46 Maskwacis Boil Water Advisories Shoot-Out Wastewater Systems and Shock Chlorination
47 First Nations to Access Economic Opportunities Through a First Nations Agricultural Strategy
48 Indigenous Human Rights and Responsibilities for the Protection of Mother Earth within Climate Change Action
56 Natural Resource Transfer Act (NRTA) Violation of Inherent Aboriginal and Treaty Rights
57 Funding for Regional First Nations Information Government Centres
67 Support to protect Anticosti Island from Industrialization
68 Support World Indigenous Trade and Enterprise Summit and Festival
69 Support for the Peel River Watershed in Yukon Territory
« Last Edit: August 23, 2016, 08:56:38 PM by jellybean »

Sap1

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Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
« Reply #14 on: August 24, 2016, 01:22:47 AM »
Possibly I may be one of those with LOTS of opinions and little knowledge?

Canada was a land with a lot of space that other countries eyed due to the oppression they were facing in their home countries. People came from all over Europe, and thousands of black slaves that were able to escape from their captors in USA came across the border to a land that offered them freedom. All these people were forever grateful for the opportunity. Even though it meant much hard work starting settlements and establishing farming. They worked hard after coming to regions that were populated with trees and brush. With simple tools they took down trees and built their houses and they cleared land for crops the same way ... blood, sweat and tears! The ex-slaves were not American, rather hundreds of thousands of people "taken" by force and thrown into the bottom of ships ... from Caribbean nations to other areas. They were often packed in like sardines at the lower part of the ships and sometimes dying down there due to lack of food and water and other necessary amenities. Those that managed to survive amongst the putrid smells were sold as slaves upon entering American soils. Those that were able to escape to Canada  thought they were in heaven. From all those families, there were many whom advanced this country.

When my father came to this country he was given land not of his choice, and this he had to repay when he began having some income from the land. With an axe he began the task of clearing dense forest, and with the same axe he cleared the bark off the trees for lumber to build his first house, while continuing to clear bush for crops and building fences for cattle. Cutting the lumber from logs was also done in a primitive fashion but it sufficed.
I never heard him ever complain how rough life was in the beginning. My mother came a year later along with their first son. Not knowing the language I will never know exactly how she made it to a distant plot of land in the middle of winter. She missed the signs she was to look for to make her way to her new home and ended up having to walk 12 miles back ... with all her baggage and a child ... in the mid of the night. My parents came at a very young age,  I was born late in my parents' lives so I didn't experience any of this, however it still saddens me to this day all the hardships they came through and never lost a step ... kept working hard to get ahead. The only problem was ... they both came from German ports and thus were not trusted ... they might be Hitler's people of all things! It was the Hitler regime they were getting away from, however the Anglo's running immigration offices seemed rather dense and ignorant. My parents ( and many others) had to report in a small town 15 miles from home once a month to report they were not doing anything untoward. On one such occasion the date they had to report was a blizzard day ... to cut it short, my mother almost froze to death and had to be hospitalized after. Yet for all the years following, my parents never BLAMED anyone and my mothers' teachings were always the same ... no matter how much someone has hurt you, let it go and put it behind you. Many people were ostracized because Anglo's thought they were Hitler's people.
I suppose my parents could have given up and found solace in the bottle of alcohol but they didn't. They raised everyone of their kids to work hard and appreciate life no matter how difficult it was. They never expected handouts and were never given any. Sometimes farmers helped each other in later years, having barn raisings, similar in fashion to Habitat for Humanity now.
Up the road about 12 miles was a metis colony of which many of the young men would come by during the times seeding and harvesting was being done and would ask for work. My father always hired them and they sat at our table and ate with us and slept under the same roof as we did. I had heard that some farmers put them up in the barn where they slept in the hayloft but my father would never have done such a cruel thing to other humans.
All these people who came from other lands and broke the land with blood, sweat and tears were one hell of an asset to the country!

So yes, I am opinionated! They had absolutely nothing to do with the laws Anglo's set out for aboriginals and I am certain they never would have agreed to such. Great ignorance played a part in those laws. My parents and others like them had it very difficult here too but they put it all behind them and forged ahead. Never asking for a handout for hardships and never getting any. Just thankful, very thankful!

What I see now is that there are many people who do not want to leave the reserves to find work. All the reserves get a lot of funding, some more than others. Take Attawapiskat for example ... where the inner circle of a very few all drive SUV's and live well, while the rest live in housing that molding and rotting with snow blowing in, in the winter. No one seems to know where the money has gone because they didn't keep records. There are many such areas across Canada. Yet they want more money and they are creating their own problems for the young people. But somehow it is OUR fault! Why?

There have been many inquiries already and how will another costly one change anything? Whatever damage was done back then in residential schools can not be fixed with financial handouts. Money does not cure depression or any other mental ills that have come out of all of that.