Author Topic: Cory Grey & Dylan Laboucan - Murdered - July 23, 2016 - Whitefish Lake FN,AB  (Read 6837 times)

GSAR_Mbr

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Missing teens both found dead as RCMP investigation widens


Two teenagers who went missing from the Whitefish Lake First Nation over the weekend have both been found dead, their bodies discovered hours and kilometres apart, police and family members say.

Dylan Laboucan and Cory Grey were boyfriend and girlfriend. He was 17, she was 19.

The young couple went missing Saturday from the remote community north of Slave Lake, Alta.

Laboucan's body was found Monday evening.

Louis Grey confirmed to CBC Tuesday that his daughter's body was found less than 24 hours later.

"Tonight, they found my girl finally, deceased, not even two kilometres from my place," said Grey.

Both deaths are being investigated by the RCMP major crimes unit from Edmonton.

The investigation began Saturday as a missing persons case.

On Saturday between 7 and 8 p.m., Laboucan was found unconscious outside the trailer where he lived with his girlfriend and her mother, Louis Grey's wife. He lives about two kilometres away.

"The guy who found them, I guess he sort of panicked," said Grey. "He really didn't try to revive him. He didn't want to go inside the trailer, because he thought someone might be inside.
'Dylan's body was gone'

"So, he took off and went to go phone from a neighbour's place. So, this took him about 15 to 20 minutes. When he returned back to the scene, Dylan's body was gone. But he'd never seen my girl."

​High Prairie RCMP say they originally responded to a complaint on Saturday about an unconscious person outside a residence on the first nation. When they arrived they found no one at the scene.

RCMP listed the two as missing over the weekend.

Louis Grey said during the search for the young couple, police brought in dogs and were assisted by people from surrounding communities.

On Monday, High Prairie RCMP said they'd found a body, and the next day confirmed it was Laboucan.

He was found about six to eight kilometres from the trailer where he lived.

"Then they tried to stop us from searching anymore," Grey said, "because we could have contaminated the crime scene."

He said police found his daughter's body at around 5 p.m. Tuesday.
'I had nine kids'

"She was the youngest of my kids," Grey said. "I had nine kids. Just three years ago, I lost my youngest son right on Christmas Day. So it's kind of hard for the family again, to happen to our two youngest kids."

Grey said his daughter and her boyfriend had been together for about a year. Laboucan had recently graduated from high school, he said, and his daughter graduated the year before.

Both had been accepted to go to vocational school in Slave Lake, Grey said.

"Everything was set up, even apartments and all that. And then this happened. They were a nice young couple. They had their little minor arguments, but just minor. They were innocent, innocent."

Whitefish Lake First Nation is north of Lesser Slave Lake

Source Link

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton/missing-teens-both-found-dead-as-rcmp-investigation-widens-1.3695733

GSAR_Mbr

Modified to add attached image
« Last Edit: July 27, 2016, 09:27:25 AM by GSAR_Mbr »

Sap1

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So sad. A whole life ahead of them and gone in an instant.
This is suspicious ... finding the young lad 'unconscious' and then approx 20 min later he is disappeared and eventually found such a distance away. There must have been a strong perp in the trailer then, and the man is lucky not to have entered. So hard on the families remaining having lost so so many young lives.
I wish them peace and some answers soon.

kathybarnes

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woops, I didn't see this post. I'll delete mine. Thanks for adding their story here. Hopefully answers will come to light soon.

GSAR_Mbr

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Alberta Whitefish First Nation teens were shot to death, police say


Two teenagers from Whitefish Lake First Nation who were a young couple in love were shot to death by someone they were "connected to," RCMP say.

RCMP say they have "a significant amount of evidence" that suggests the killings of Dylan Laboucan and Cory Grey in north-central Alberta were not random. ​

Laboucan, 17, and Grey, 19, lived on the First Nation north of Lesser Slave Lake.

"This is a small community, where people are well known to each other and where people who come from outside the community are known as well," said RCMP Insp. Gibson Glavin. "This was not a random act. These two victims, Dylan and Cory, were killed by a person connected to them in some way."

The medical examiner conducted autopsies Wednesday that showed both victims died from gunshot wounds, police said.

This is not the first time that Grey's mother has dealt with a personal tragedy, Galvin said.

"Cory's mother has suffered this devastating blow," he said, "and has already suffered other devastating blows in her life. She is an extraordinary woman."

Asked if the teens' families have anything to fear for the killer or killers, Glavin said nothing leads investigators to believe that.

Grey's mother, he said, "is a key element to our investigation and working regularly with our investigators. It's pretty unlikely someone will come back to visit her."
Glavin offered few details about the killings. He did not say precisely where the bodies were found, or how many times the two victims were shot. But he did say that RCMP have already collected a significant amount of evidence and are working hard to solve the case.

"With this critical evidence now known by the RCMP, the investigation is focused upon arresting the person or persons responsible for these murders," police said.

Laboucan had been reported missing on Saturday and his body was found Monday evening. Grey was reported missing on Monday, and her body was discovered less than 24 hours later.

"If not for the tireless efforts of the community members and their participation in the search of the rural area outside High Prairie, it is unlikely the bodies of both victims would have been located as early as they had been," RCMP said.

Source Link

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton/alberta-whitefish-first-nation-teens-were-shot-to-death-police-say-1.3698892

GSAR_Mbr

Sap1

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This has been bothering me a lot because it reminds me of two other incidents in past years in the north. One case was at Lac La Biche and the perpetrators had originally been from the area and had long gone to Edmonton. While in Edmonton they got into gangs and for some reason, they decided to head back north to pillage.
Second case happened at the Buffalo metis settlement, same thing ... guys were in gangs in the city and away from the settlement for a long time and came back for easy pickings. They destroyed some lives in their rampage (mentally and physically) and even their own relatives.

This is going to take some work for the police but I do think they will have some answers after scouring the woods surrounding the area where these two children were found.
My heart goes out to the families. :(


capeheart

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I do believe this was someone who befriended both victims and lured them to be killed. I wonder if they did have any cell phones or there are any records such as the last persons to talk with them. This is a very small community and it should be very easy to find out who did this. I believe it was someone who was jealous of their success that was coming for them, someone who could not stand they were getting out of the area and into a new world of finding themselves with jobs and a future. I am pretty confident the killer or killers will be caught. I find it very unusual that the cousin found the victim and when he went back the body was removed and placed somewhere else. He actually was being watched maybe, at that time. A very creepy situation and a very dangerous person out there on the reserve. Thoughts and prayers to all of the family and friends and the police who have to deal with solving this crime. A senseless loss of life. :'( :'( :'( :'( :'( :'(

Sap1

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They really were an extraordinary young couple ... not just in the community --- considering all teens their age. Teachers who had taught them are coming from as far as Ontario to pay respects to these children and their families.

IMO, the cousin that found Dylan did the right thing. There was apparently still danger around the area and he needed to also protect his children in the vehicle. It could have turned out worse if he had tried reviving Dylan, and by the sounds of it, Dylan was not alive (imo) anymore.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton/slain-whitefish-first-nation-couple-were-wonderful-kids-destined-to-lead-their-community-1.3701765

Dylan Laboucan was smart and gifted, a polite young man with a smile for everyone.

Cory Grey was strong and outgoing, a bigger-than-life young woman who simply would not allow tragedy to shape her destiny.

"They were going to be leaders in their community," said Eddie Sargent, who taught both teens at the reserve school in a tiny community north of Lesser Slave Lake in Alberta.

"They were going to find success."

Those bright futures went black, like someone flipped off a light switch, earlier this week, when someone shot and killed Laboucan, 17, and his girlfriend, Grey, 19, and dumped their bodies on two separate well sites on the Whitefish Lake First Nations reserve.

How could this happen to them?

Sargent taught at Atikameg School from September 2009 until June 2014. He was principal during the last two years and is now chair of academics at Northern Lakes College in Slave Lake, where his two former students were registered to attend classes this fall.

The fact that both teens finished high school (Laboucan was the only member of his graduating class this spring) was "a big deal," Sargent said, given the odds stacked against so many Indigenous students in Canada.

'They were going to be leaders in their community. They were going to find success.'
- Eddie Sargent, couple's former teacher
"There's so many other issues that the students contend with, outside of school, that they have to overcome," he said. "That's why it's a big deal."

Many of the young people he taught, Sargent said, "have lived a lifetime of tragedies by the time they're 18 years old. Four of the students that I've coached and taught in Atikameg have been convicted of murder. That's not normal."

Laboucan and Grey, according to their families, friends and former teacher, were exceptional in many ways.

cory and dylan
The RCMP are now conducting a double homicide investigation into the shootings of Grey, left, and Laboucan. (Facebook)

"They were never involved with drugs or drinking," Sargent said. "I think that's why it's so shocking to everyone. Everyone's thinking, 'How could this happen to Dylan and Cory?' They were not the type of kids who were ever involved in that world where something like this would happen to them.

"In Canada, a lot of the non-Aboriginal population has these stereotypes," he said. "These students were wonderful kids. They were wonderful, wonderful kids that were on the cusp of becoming independent and giving so much back to society. And they were taken away for absolutely no reason."

Laboucan got the top marks in math and science in his grade.

"He was a really, really gifted student," Sargent said. "He had the world in front of him. He was someone who was going to do very well in life."

'They were wonderful, wonderful kids that were on the cusp of becoming independent and giving so much back to society. And they were taken away for absolutely no reason.'
- Eddie Sargent
Laboucan's mother, Becky Thunder, said her son was a fast learner who once skipped a grade.

"His dreams were big and he was chasing after them," she said."I raised my son well."

Grey was also a good student, he said.

Melinda Yellowknee was close to Grey growing up on the reserve and admired her friend, who had plans to work with children after college.

"I was proud of her because that's also my goal," Yellowknee said, who had a baby not long ago and is finishing who studies through home schooling. "I actually wanted to do the same thing as she's doing, after I graduate Grade 12."

'It hurts so much'

Laboucan and Grey were from Whitefish River, a tiny place 40 minutes down a gravel road from Atikameg. Both communities are part of the Whitefish Lake First Nation.

Atikameg School didn't even have a senior high program for many years, so kids who wanted to go beyond junior high had to attend a boarding school in High Prairie, Sargent said, an hour down the highway. Many students found it difficult being away from home at such young ages, which hurt their chances of finishing high school.

The local started the program again five or six years ago. In 2014, the first graduating class in recent memory had nine students, the largest by far in the school's history, Sargent said.

Dylan and Cory
Grey, left, and Laboucan, right, were students at the Atikameg School. Their former teacher, Eddie Sargent, says they were 'going to find success' and be leaders in their community. (Eddie Sargent)

When Dylan was in Grade 7, the school started up a basketball team. The boy came into his own around then, Sargent said. He grew taller and gained confidence, and eventually captained the team, which won division championships in back to back years.

"If he didn't have Cory hand in hand, it would be a basketball," Thunder said of her son.

"It hurts so much," she said. "I never thought I'd see this day, to lose one of my children."

Sargent said teachers who taught Laboucan and Grey at Atikameg School, but now live elsewhere in the province or the country, are making their way north to pay their respects.

"They're travelling from Calgary, from south of Edmonton, one's actually trying to get here from Ontario," he said. "That's the impact that they had on people.

"We've had a lot of tragedy in Atikameg. And this is not like the other times."

jellybean

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This is so very very sad - How tragic for their families. And such a loss to society. :'(

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton/cory-grey-dylan-laboucan-whitefish-first-nation-vigil-1.3704925

Sap1

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Touching tribute to this young couple. This love story of theirs is what movies are made of, except the ending is so very tragic. RIP together Cory and Dylan. :(

http://edmontonjournal.com/news/local-news/hundreds-turn-out-to-mourn-teen-couple-slain-in-northern-alberta

jellybean

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The only reason that I can come up with is -   jealousy, envy and deep resentment over this couple's success.

Here we have a young couple who were achievers, and found a way to better themselves and  leave their reserve. They had a future - the killer or killers felt as though they, themselves, did not.

People gossip in these small places and I would think that reserves are not any different.
Word will get around as to who did this, and they will eventually be caught.

My sincere condolences go out to the families of this beautiful couple.

jb
« Last Edit: August 07, 2016, 04:02:23 PM by jellybean »

jobo

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This truly is a sad, senseless murder of a young couple about to make their way in the world.
May they both RIP.
Hopefully the killer(s) are quickly apprehended.

aymes

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This case is so so sad. It also seems so out of nowhere that someone would want to harm them. I found a link saying that Cory's brother was killed by someone who got away with it. I'm wondering if there's a possible connection ? Here is the link to the article. Rip little ones. Thinking of all the people who knew them.
I hope they solve this case soon .

http://m.torontosun.com/2016/07/27/rcmp-investigate-deaths-of-northern-alberta-teenage-couple

debbiec

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Cory and Dylan had their whole lives ahead of them. From everything I've read they were both moving in a very positive direction. Their futures were full of hope, promise and love. So sad that their young lives came to such a tragic end.  My thoughts are with those who are grieving.

RIP Cory and Dylan. You will be together forever.

Sap1

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This was swift work by various RCMP jurisdictions. Arrest made. (More info at following link which is repetitious to other articles already posted.)

Excerpt:
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton/whitefish-lake-teens-double-homicide-arrest-1.3715388

A suspect has been arrested in connection with the shooting deaths of a teen couple on the Whitefish Lake First Nation reserve in northern Alberta, RCMP say.

Police did not give any details about the identity of the person in custody or say anything about charges.

High school sweethearts Dylan Laboucan, 17, and Cory Grey, 19, were weeks away from moving away to attend college when they went missing at the end of July from the trailer where they lived with his parents.

Days later, their bullet-riddled bodies were found, his on one well-site and hers on another a few kilometres away.

Sap1

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http://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/19-year-old-man-charged-in-alberta-double-homicide-1.3027194

CTVNews.ca Staff
Published Friday, August 12, 2016 7:25PM EDT
Last Updated Friday, August 12, 2016 8:32PM EDT
A 19-year-old man has been arrested in the shooting death of two teenagers from a Northern Alberta First Nation last month.
RCMP in High Prairie Alta., charged Edward Devin Boyce Gladue from the Whitefish Lake First Nation with two counts of second-degree murder in connection with the murders of Dylan Laboucan and Cory Grey on Friday.and the killings were not believed to be random.
Gladue is scheduled to appear in a High Prairie courtroom on Monday, August 15.