Author Topic: Victoria Joanne Crow Shoe, 43 - Homicide, Sept 2015 - Lethbridge/Pincher Creek  (Read 2202 times)


wellwell

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Any word on the investigation into Victoria's murder?

jellybean

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http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/lethbridge-woman-crow-shoe-body-found-police-ask-for-help-1.3232203

Victoria Joanne Crow Shoe's death has police asking for help
Lethbridge was reported missing Sept. 15
CBC News Posted: Sep 17, 2015 11:16 AM MT Last Updated: Sep 17, 2015 12:04 PM MT

The RCMP is asking for public assistance in their investigation into the death of 43-year-old Victoria Joanne Crow Shoe.

The Lethbridge resident's body was found by a fisherman along the shore of the Oldman River reservoir at the Windy Point campground just north of Pincher Creek on Sunday.

She was reported missing to Lethbridge police on Sept. 15 and was last seen by her family on Aug. 26.

The RCMP is asking for anyone with information on Crow Shoe's whereabouts and activities between Aug. 26 and Sept. 13 to contact the Pincher Creek detachment at 403-627-6010 or by email to allison.blue@rcmp-grc.gc.ca.

If you have information but would like to remain anonymous, contact Crime Stoppers.

wellwell

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https://calgarysun.com/news/crime/rcmp-hope-new-information-sheds-light-on-2015-murder-of-lethbridge-woman

Mounties are releasing new information in the 2015 slaying of 43-year-old Victoria (Vickie) Joanne Crow Shoe whose body was found on the shores of the Oldman River Reservoir.

RCMP say the Lethbridge woman was last seen on Aug. 31, 2015, and investigators with the major crimes unit believe her body was put in the reservoir shortly thereafter. Her body was found on Sept. 13, 2015, at the Windy Point Boat Launch, just north of Pincher Creek.

Her unclothed body was believed to be bound by a piece of kernmantle construction rope before she was put into the water, RCMP said. The rope has two black tracers in the sheath weave.

When last seen alive, Crow Shoe was wearing a black Fox Racing pullover hoodie and black pants and was carrying a purple bag, and/or an over the shoulder duffle bag.

RCMP say the major crimes unit deployed several resources on the reservoir, including a dive team.

RCMP are asking anyone with information to call them at 403-343-5582.







wellwell

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Photo of the Oldman Reservoir with a boat here:

http://www.windspeaker.com/news/windspeaker-news/rcmp-major-crimes-unit-continues-to-investigate-the-murder-of-victoria-crow-shoe/

Does anyone think Kelly Cook's killer could still be alive and capable of doing this? The Oldman Reservoir near where Victoria Crow Shoe was found is wide open and exposed during the daylight hours, although the road is not always well-travelled. It's also very close to Chinook Park Estates and Summerview. And there's camping.

https://www.albertaparks.ca/parks/south/oldman-dam-pra/information-facilities/camping/windy-point/

Who uses this guage and type of kernmantle rope? Was it static or dynamic? Recreational (climbing, boating, horse handling, etc.)? Occupational (forestry, firefighting, window  washing, etc.)?

« Last Edit: October 12, 2018, 07:04:50 PM by wellwell »

Sap1

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Sounds as though that type of rope is used for rescues and it makes me wonder who would just happen to have that kind of rope around for their convenience if it wasn't originally used for the specific purpose.

  http://www.pioneerrescue.com/breaking-down-kernmantle-rope-2/

There is mountain climbing sport and caving in Crowsnest Pass. Rescuers and sports minded people would probably use this type of rope as it is safer. I wonder if that is something police may be looking into who in or around the area are most likely to partake in those activities. 

   http://www.crowsnestpass.worldweb.com/SightsAttractions/CavesCliffsCanyons/
« Last Edit: October 13, 2018, 11:44:33 PM by Sap1 »

wellwell

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Sap1, yes, that is one of the uses for that kind of rope. Firefighter training has taken place in the area, and rescues are part of that line of work.

I think that the kind of knots used may be recognized by people in the know. Some of these are possible, but I don't know knots. Here's a link to some horse training knots:

https://eclectic-horseman.com/tying-knots-that-work-for-horses/

Another thing is obvious when you take a look at the area. It's full of wind turbines. They weren't kidding when they came up with "Windy Point". The number of turbines just keeps on increasing, thus the roads in the area around the campground can be very busy with work trucks passing by, especially in the summer. Wind turbine blades are inspected regularly, by workers who rappel. Here's a demonstration:

https://youtu.be/U643DzJig6s

Many knots are versatile for multiple uses, from climbing to boating to horse training, such as the bowline knot.

There is a list of wind farms in Alberta here. There are a lot of them in the Pincher Creek area:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_wind_farms_in_Canada

Old ones have been taken out of service subsequent to this August 30, 2015 incident:

http://www.pinchercreekvoice.com/2015/09/wind-topples-cowley-ridge-turbine.html?m=1

« Last Edit: October 14, 2018, 03:36:23 PM by wellwell »

wellwell

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This article describes using 80-foot ropes and pulleys to haul maintenance supplies up the old wind turbines. I don't doubt that there could have been old rope left behind at the base of  wind turbines from time to time. Anyone driving around could pick it up.

https://www.windpowerengineering.com/business-news-projects/decommissioning-canadas-oldest-wind-farm/

Sap1

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I had no idea about the wind turbines being there also and all the upkeep and traffic in the general area. Nor of all the different knots used, well the knot everyone uses for tying a shoelace, and the simple knot for horses, and yes there are many uses then for various ropes. The police didn't put out a picture of the rope initially b/c they were likely doing all those checks prior and came to a dead end investigation wise and now put the picture out. The rope still could twig someone's memory and it wouldn't be the first time a relatively small piece helped solve a case. Then as you say, if that rope had been carelessly left by workers, anyone could have picked it up.

wellwell

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Here's an article about how the tracers in rope are important to solving a murder:

http://www.innocencecanada.com/exonerations/thomas-sophonow/


One of the witnesses, Mr. Doerksen, had observed the killer running away from the crime scene. Mr. Doerksen saw the killer throw something into the river while running over a bridge. Police later retrieved a piece of twine from this location which had fibres imbedded in it that had come from Barbara’s sweater. When the police investigated the source of this twine – which had been used to strangle Barbara – they found that it could have come from one of two companies, Powers Twines or Berkley. They asked officials from each company whether the twine had come from them. The Powers Twines officials visually inspected the twine and concluded that it was theirs, while Berkeley officials concluded that the twine had not come from their company. Importantly, Berkeley added a tracer element to all of their twine, and a $100 test could have been performed to find out whether or not the twine contained this distinctive tracer. Inexplicably, this test was not carried out.[5]

This failure turned out to be enormously important, as Berkeley manufactured their twine in Portage la Prairie (near Winnipeg), whereas Powers Twines’ plant was in Washington, and easily accessible at various British Columbia construction sites. Since the police believed that the twine in question came from Powers Twines, and they knew that Thomas was living in Vancouver, they concluded that Thomas was the person who had used the twine to kill Barbara. We now know that a simple, inexpensive test could have revealed the truth; that the twine was actually from Berkeley’s Portage la Prairie plant – a fact that might have saved Thomas decades of living with the stigma of being a murderer.
« Last Edit: October 22, 2018, 01:06:57 PM by wellwell »

wellwell

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There is some very useful information here about rescue ropes. Since 1990, these ropes have a manufacture date in the tracer.

https://www.dynamicrescue.com/blogs/news/16276517-ask-a-pro-how-long-does-my-rope-last-for-british-columbia

Logbooks are kept, and records of sale are kept. This is for rescue rope sold in B.C. Expired rope is often cut up into small pieces for knot-tying practice.

Remembering that Lethbridge is a shopping destination for southeastern B.C. residents, and that Lethbridge residents cross the border for recreation in places like Fernie. Rope could make its way between B.C. and Alberta.