Author Topic: Jack & Micheline Hulme | Dayspring | June 3, 1985  (Read 5477 times)

Besani

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Jack & Micheline Hulme | Dayspring | June 3, 1985
« on: April 16, 2014, 10:21:59 AM »
A double homicide from roughly 30 years ago has been added to the province's Rewards for Major Unsolved Crimes program. The bodies of Jack and Micheline Hulme were discovered by Bridgewater RCMP following a house fire in Dayspring on June 3, 1985. The fire was suspicious and police are still looking for answers. Anyone who shares information leading to the arrest and conviction of those responsible for their deaths could receive up to $150,000. People can provide tips to the Rewards for Major Unsolved Crimes program at 1-888-710-9090.

http://ckbwnews.blogspot.ca/2014/04/province-adds-dayspring-double-homicide.html?m=1
« Last Edit: April 16, 2014, 04:02:02 PM by Besani »

Besani

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Re: Jack and Micheline Hulme
« Reply #1 on: April 16, 2014, 10:29:36 AM »
 To all accounts, John and Micheline Hulme were good people.

 The couple had raised two sons and were well liked in their Dayspring neighbourhood. They had volunteered as boy scout leaders and lived a quiet lifestyle, working in their yard and making home-made wine. Forty-one-year-old Micheline walked each morning with a couple of neighbours. John, 46, who went by Jack, was a local gunsmith and amateur inventor, a design engineer who was also president of his own small manufacturing company.

 When Jack and Micheline's bodies were found inside their burned home on June 3, 1985, the community mourned. That grief was quickly joined by fear when autopsies revealed the couple had been murdered, shot to death, before the blaze was intentionally set in an effort to conceal the crime.

 Why would anyone want to kill such normal people leading such normal lives in a small community on Nova Scotia's South Shore?

 It's a question that has never been answered.

 Jack and Micheline had spent the previous day, a Saturday, at home. They had just returned from a trip to their home province of Quebec. Micheline was seen mowing the lawn. Jack chatted with a neighbour around 8:30 p.m.

 Their oldest son, Paul, lived in Sydney. Steven was about to graduate from high school and planned to go on to university. He had spent Friday night at the home of his girlfriend's family and travelled with them to a horse show on Saturday.

 Witnesses would later tell police that they heard what they thought were two or three gunshots in the area around 12:15 a.m. At 1:30 a.m., the Dayspring fire department responded to an alarm to the Hulme home.

 Chief Wilfred Feener got a call at home from an employee of Scotia Business Centre, a local emergency dispatch service. She'd been on her way home from work when she saw what she believed was a large woods fire in Dayspring.

 The chief went out to locate the blaze and discovered it was the Hulme home.

 "By the time I got up to the fire, the alarm was already sounding," the chief recalls. "When I got there, it was fully engulfed."

 Although neighbours said there could be people inside, firefighters weren't able to confirm that until morning. The fire was too hot to search earlier. The investigation later revealed that an accelerant had been used to make the two-storey home burn faster.

 Firefighters were dousing hot spots in the burned-out structure when they washed coals off a body. It turned out to be Micheline Hulme, who had been in bed when she died. Investigators then knew it was likely that they would find a second body somewhere amid the ashes.

 Jack's body was located in the kitchen area, where the fire was believed to have started.

 The fire marshal's office was called in to assist with the investigation. At that point, investigators believed they were dealing with a fatal house fire. The discovery that something more sinister had happened travelled through the community.

 "It was quite a shock," Chief Feener says. "I remember it just the same as if it happened yesterday."

 The Feeners lived about two kilometres from the Hulme home and they knew Jack and Micheline quite well. The couple had been around the fire hall for years volunteering as cub and scout leaders. The fire chief's sons were scouts and he sometimes accompanied the Hulmes and boys on outings.

 He describes them as "just real nice people. I would say quiet, but they would do anything for you. If you wanted something done, if they could help you out, they would."

 With the discovery of the double-homicide, a team of RCMP investigators converged on the community. They sifted through the ashes of the home and probed the lives of the victims.

 Once the initial furor passed, several Mounties continued to work full time on the case for over a year before an arrest was made. Several witnesses were interviewed under hypnosis. A forensic psychiatrist worked with the investigation team. Because the RCMP had no similar service at the time, information was forwarded to the behavioural sciences unit of the FBI.

 Excerpts of that FBI profile, released by the RCMP in June 1986, indicated the assailant was a single male Caucasian in his late teens to mid-twenties. The assailant would have had more than a passing familiarity with the Hulmes and frequent access to the house. The profile also indicated that the assailant would have been a resident of the area who had difficulty dealing with women and feelings of remorse and guilt over the act, which might have been committed on impulse.

 Shortly after that profile was released, the RCMP arrested a teenager and charged him with Micheline's murder. The accused's name was never released and is still protected under the Young Offenders Act.

 Using relatively-new legislation at the time, the Crown attempted to have the case transferred to adult court. After hearing testimony from more than a dozen witnesses, then Provincial Court Judge Hiram Carver denied the application in September 1986. That decision was upheld on appeal by the Supreme Court of Nova Scotia.

 In February 1987, the charge was dismissed after the Attorney General's department decided not to offer any evidence in the case. Then Attorney General Terry Donahoe indicated that procedural and evidentiary restraints imposed by the Young Offenders Act made a conviction in youth court more difficult to obtain.

 The Bridgewater RCMP detachment's staff sergeant at the time was quoted saying Jack Hulme's murder was still outstanding and "it's not going to go away." The investigator with the RCMP's major crimes unit who is currently responsible for the Hulme case offers similar comments.

 "This is a very solvable homicide, and it will be," Cst. Derek Williams says. "Because the evidence is already there. We haven't lost anything on these cases. Time is on our side."

 In 1985, DNA testing was not widely-used in Canada. But investigators still have the exhibits from the case, which are being re-examined as part of the latest review of outstanding homicides within the province. DNA testing and other investigation advances will be used.

 Investigators say continually developing technology should make anyone who believes they got away with any murder wary.

 "The pressure is on them, because of the advancement in technology," Cst. Williams says. "Back then, if they'd had the advancements that we have today, I'm sure those investigators probably would have solved it because they did a lot of great work. A lot of time and effort was put into this case."

 The RCMP aren't saying too much about suspects in the Hulme case, although they say they know what the motive was behind the killings.

 Investigators did refute a couple of rumours that circulated through the community following the Hulmes' deaths. A theory that the murders were connected to some sort of invention that Jack was working on at the time was false. He had developed a clear-view screen for fishing boats that doesn't fog up, but that had nothing to do with the killings.

 "It was definitely not organized crime. That did come up. It was a rumour and it was thoroughly investigated at the time. There was no connection," Cst. Williams says.

http://southshorenow.ca/old_site/archives/viewer.php?sctn=2001/112101/news&article=16


jellybean

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Re: Jack and Micheline Hulme
« Reply #2 on: April 16, 2014, 11:33:26 AM »
I wonder what time the youngest son arrived home from the Saturday outing at the horse show? There is no mentioning of him in this article, after the attending of the horse show on that Saturday. ???
Neighbours heard gunshots at around 12:15 am.  I am assuming this would be early Sunday a.m?

jb
« Last Edit: April 16, 2014, 11:40:03 AM by jellybean »

Besani

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Re: Jack and Micheline Hulme
« Reply #3 on: April 16, 2014, 03:59:39 PM »
Im trying to find the location of their home. Does anyone know?

As for the teenager that was arrested, why was he arrested? Was he always seen at the home?, possibly a friend of their youngest son?

jellybean

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Re: Jack & Micheline Hulme | Dayspring | June 3, 1985
« Reply #4 on: January 27, 2017, 02:16:46 PM »
I think they had the culprit.  Sadly, because of the laws regarding Young Offenders, at that time, their hands were tied.

Quote
Shortly after that profile was released, the RCMP arrested a teenager and charged him with Micheline's murder. The accused's name was never released and is still protected under the Young Offenders Act.

 Using relatively-new legislation at the time, the Crown attempted to have the case transferred to adult court. After hearing testimony from more than a dozen witnesses, then Provincial Court Judge Hiram Carver denied the application in September 1986. That decision was upheld on appeal by the Supreme Court of Nova Scotia.

 In February 1987, the charge was dismissed after the Attorney General's department decided not to offer any evidence in the case. Then Attorney General Terry Donahoe indicated that procedural and evidentiary restraints imposed by the Young Offenders Act made a conviction in youth court more difficult to obtain.

The law attempted to try him in adult court, but it was denied.
By coming under the Young Offender's Act they had too many restraints to prove it beyond a reasonable doubt./jb

bevboy0223

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Re: Jack & Micheline Hulme | Dayspring | June 3, 1985
« Reply #5 on: April 05, 2017, 12:47:55 PM »
I'd be honored to do an article for Frank Magazine about the Hulme's. Write me, and we can make this happen.

Bev@frankmagazine.ca

Bev

jellybean

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Re: Jack & Micheline Hulme | Dayspring | June 3, 1985
« Reply #6 on: April 09, 2017, 08:28:44 PM »
Hi BevBoy!  I thought that since you are a reporter that you might do some investigating on these cases, and tell us something that we do not know.

I gather you live in the area, or NS Province??

We are stuck with old articles - and wonder if  perhaps you can dig up some "fresh news" regarding these unsolved crimes?

JB
« Last Edit: April 09, 2017, 08:40:37 PM by jellybean »

bevboy0223

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Re: Jack & Micheline Hulme | Dayspring | June 3, 1985
« Reply #7 on: July 04, 2017, 11:32:59 AM »
Well, I would very much like to do some investigating, but to do that, I need some sources willing to talk to me.

Bev

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Re: Jack & Micheline Hulme | Dayspring | June 3, 1985
« Reply #8 on: July 04, 2017, 11:33:49 AM »
Once again, you can write me at bev@frankmagazine.ca

Bev

Sap1

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Re: Jack & Micheline Hulme | Dayspring | June 3, 1985
« Reply #9 on: July 04, 2017, 06:20:44 PM »
Bev, on any of these cases of missing and murdered, we all know as much as media articles give us, which is not a lot in some cases. We posters are from across Canada and some from USA, looking for info that may lead to clues for those who are missing. What is here, unfortunately, is as much as we know from googling. :)

eta: Link above would not work for me and I found this pdf file from a newspaper. It shows Jack and Micheline, and their house.

http://www.lighthousenow.ca/papers/PB_20140423.pdf
« Last Edit: July 04, 2017, 06:31:09 PM by Sap1 »

Concerned

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Re: Jack & Micheline Hulme | Dayspring | June 3, 1985
« Reply #10 on: July 09, 2017, 08:19:24 AM »
Where were the kids? What have they revealed?