Author Topic: Irene Francis Gibbons - Strathroy, ON - Murdered - 1975  (Read 8656 times)

George Fayne

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Re: Irene Francis Gibbons - Strathroy, ON - Murdered - 1975
« Reply #15 on: May 25, 2018, 02:47:44 PM »
Thank you, freeman!

I will update this other thread that I started about those three crimes.

Even if these murders aren't related, I wonder if, on a statistical level, this sort of crime (home invasion, elderly woman) was common in the 70s.  (though it seems like murder rates were, just generally, pretty high in that decade)

Hmm, I'd be interested to see that documentary about Irene.  Perhaps her death received more media coverage than I thought.


George Fayne

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Re: Irene Francis Gibbons - Strathroy, ON - Murdered - 1975
« Reply #17 on: May 30, 2018, 05:23:25 PM »
Thank you for looking into this, freeman.

That's too bad!  I was also hoping that someone had uploaded it to Youtube, but no dice!

I did find this interesting article in the Globe and Mail.  It's a really long feature article about Strathroy's climate in the wake of Judith Barksey, Louise Jenner, and Irene Gibbons's murders.  The writer takes some, um, creative liberties--like she tends to lean heavily on the whole "big city reporter in a small country town" trope-- but it does paint a compelling picture of the community in this time.  Apparently, there were some violent sexual assaults around this time.

I've attached a PDF copy.

I should also add that this article appears to have an image taken from one of the crime scenes (I think?!?!?)... thankfully you can't really make out the victim's body.

George Fayne

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Re: Irene Francis Gibbons - Strathroy, ON - Murdered - 1975
« Reply #18 on: July 15, 2018, 01:38:01 PM »
If you go a "Google Maps" search of the address listed in the article that I had posted in my previous entry, you might notice a couple of things (I'm not directly posting the address out of respect for the current home owner's privacy).  Firstly, that Irene's house is right in the centre of a "T" intersection and is extremely visible.  Secondly, the houses in this neighbourhood are very close together.  The yards are tiny.

The intersection detail is very striking to me.  Irene's house would have been fairly visible to a passer-by.  I read somewhere that houses situated at intersections are often targeted by intruders because of their visibility, and because it's easier for a passing car or bicyclist to linger at an intersection without notice.  The openness of this area suggests to me that the location is a prime factor in this case.  In other words, my gut is telling me that Irene was not murdered by someone that she knew through previous encounters, rather she was targeted by someone who was creeping the neighbourhood. 

I'm not certain what to say about the close proximity of the houses.  Perhaps the killer knew of some pathway that would enable an easy escape?

George Fayne

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Re: Irene Francis Gibbons - Strathroy, ON - Murdered - 1975
« Reply #19 on: August 28, 2018, 07:17:18 AM »
Thera Dieleman of Innerkip (1988)

******
OPP to reveal new details about 1988 homicide
BY DALE CARRUTHERS
ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED: AUG 27, 2018

Thera Dieleman of Innerkip, was a murder victim who died in her home at the age of 80
A 30-year-old Southwestern Ontario murder is expected to take a new twist Tuesday, with investigators of an 80-year-old widow’s slaying saying they’ll reveal new suspect information.

Ontario Provincial Police have called a news conference to discuss the unsolved homicide of Thera Dieleman, whose strangled and beaten body was found near the front door of her Innerkip home, north of Woodstock in Oxford County, on Sept. 16, 1988.

Dieleman had lived in Indonesia, then a Dutch colony, and survived three years in an internment camp after the Japanese invaded the country during the Second World War.

The elderly woman likely resisted and injured her attacker before dying, police have said.

It’s the second time this summer police in the London region have gone public in a bid for help solving decades-old unsolved cases, a tactic one expert says can pay off, in part because so many years have gone by.

“Often, the passage of time allows people to become less reluctant to speak and all they need is a bit of a prompt or a nudge to come forward with what they know,” said Mike Arntfield, a former London police detective who’s now a Western University sociology professor and author of a best-selling book on cold-case killings.

The OPP held a news conference 10 years ago about the Dieleman case and said they’d recovered a man’s DNA from her body but needed someone to name the person responsible for her slaying.

The DNA didn’t match any of the persons of interest in the case, nor did police find the suspect among those in the national DNA databank, they said at the time.

No arrests were made, despite a $50,000 reward.

Last seen alive on Sept. 15, 1988, after being dropped off at her home following a day in Goderich, Dieleman didn’t answer the phone when friends tried calling her the next day. Witnesses reported seeing a red, flatbed truck in Dieleman’s driveway on the day her body was found.

Tuesday’s news conference is scheduled for 11 a.m. at the OPP’s regional headquarters in London.

The OPP also went public last month,  to try to solve another old case, the death of Suzanne Deborah Miller, 25, whose body was found in a wooded area near Thorndale, on Oct. 12, 1974.

Police posted a video describing Miller’s killing to the OPP’s YouTube channel and shared it across social media. Bus ads and a minivan outfitted with information about the case were used to prompt people with information to call police. A reward for information about the Miller case was increased to $50,000.

But Arntfield criticized the OPP for their track record of not releasing enough information to the public in the early stages of death investigations.

“Unfortunately, with this agency, the public is never kept in the loop during the initial, critical, first phase of the investigation. These pressers, 10, 20, 30 years later, are often the first piece of information that they’ve ever publicly confirmed,” he said.

“I guess we’ll wait and see what they have to say.”

dcarruthers@postmedia.com

twitter.com/DaleatLFPress


elsie

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Re: Irene Francis Gibbons - Strathroy, ON - Murdered - 1975
« Reply #20 on: December 03, 2018, 08:57:10 PM »
"A Viable Suspect: The Story of Multiple Murders and How a Police Force's Reach Proved Too Short for Canada's Most Notorious Cold Case"  by Barry Ruhl refers to the case of Irene Gibbons and to others though out Ontario.    I attended one of the author's presentations and certainly many facts support his theory.  But since the suspect is now deceased, it is unlikely to be proven - unless there is DNA that could be used like in the case of the Golden State Killer.