Author Topic: Sonia Varaschin | 42 | Orangeville | Murder | August 29, 2010 | Part 2  (Read 401725 times)

jobo

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Re: Sonia Varaschin | 42 | Orangeville | Murder | August 29, 2010 | Part 2
« Reply #1440 on: December 29, 2018, 07:28:55 PM »
I just made a comment on one of my news feeds, regarding this UNSOLVED murder of Sonia. I want to hear some updates.
It really isn’t far from my mind...and sorry but you all must know I think it’s someone from the hospital..someone they would not expect..obviously, they don’t suspect, I guess, as they haven’t arrested anyone.
I have to say I’m very impatient on this...cannot imagine what Sonia’s family feels.
I go through Orangeville every few months...very impersonal, highway intersection there...everyone busy trying to get where they’re going...even though around Orangeville is rural...everyone seems in a hurry.

Ron

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Re: Sonia Varaschin | 42 | Orangeville | Murder | August 29, 2010 | Part 2
« Reply #1441 on: December 29, 2018, 08:03:24 PM »
Why don't they try this ????

https://www.orangeville.com/news-story/9070548-ontario-cold-case-familial-dna-searches-could-help-crack-cold-cases-like-sonia-varaschin-murder-expert/





Process not permitted in Canada, Privacy Commissioner explains
News Dec 12, 2018 by Danielle Marr Almaguin News
Sonia Varaschin

Sadly, despite the hope evident in this sign, nobody saw Sonia Varaschin alive again. Her body was found about a week after she was reported missing. - Orangeville Banner file photo

It has been more than seven years since Sonia Varaschin was murdered, and forensics expert Rockne Harmon believes familial DNA searches could hold the key to cracking the case.

But, the process is not permitted in Canada.

A traditional search requires DNA collected at a crime scene to be a perfect match with a profile that already exists in the Criminal Offenders Database.

Familial DNA searching, on the other hand, is designed to identify close relatives.
Related Content

    ONTARIO COLD CASE: OPP could be searching for multiple suspects in unsolved Sonia Varaschin murder case

The process uses a male hereditary test, so it will not identify aunts, second cousins or half-brothers. But it will confirm or refute whether or not the person who left the DNA at the crime scene is a father, son, or full sibling of someone who is already in the database.

In countries where the process is permitted (the U.K., Netherlands, New Zealand and several American states), it is generally only used when all other avenues have been exhausted, and a match has not been found through a traditional search. It is an intelligence tool to be used in an investigation — not proof.

Harmon, a prosecutor in the highly publicized O.J. Simpson case, worked as a senior deputy district attorney in California for 33 years.

Now retired, Harmon works as a forensic cold case consultant, and spends much of his time advocating for the use of DNA typing in criminal cases around the world.

The longtime district attorney was the driving force behind the California attorney general’s decision to implement familial DNA searching in the state, which led to the arrest of the “Grim Sleeper” serial killer in 2010.

“When I go somewhere to talk about familial searching, something that people are unfamiliar with, it is important to make it very concrete rather than abstract,” he said. “There is nothing more concrete than a dead woman


A petite woman in her early 40s, Varaschin was reported missing after her blood-spattered vehicle was found abandoned behind a store in Orangeville, on Aug. 30, 2010.

A massive search was launched, with police reporting neighbours hearing screams coming from her apartment the night before she was reported missing.

Her body was discovered a week later, on Sept. 5, 2010, in a wooded area along Beech Grove Sideroad in Caledon, by a resident walking their dog.

Police received hundreds of tips from the public over the years, however the case remains unsolved today.

At a news conference in 2011, the OPP announced that some 600 DNA samples had been collected from men over 18 in the surrounding area — but again the efforts did not see successful results.

“These sweeps, or drags for DNA, are very rarely successful,” said Harmon. “Not only is the process of collecting hundreds of samples like that far more expensive than familial searching, those kinds of interactions between police and law-abiding citizens create a certain kind of tension.”

So, what then is the issue with familial searching?

According to Cecilia Hagemen, a Canadian criminal lawyer and forensic scientist who has served as an expert witness on more than 130 criminal cases in Ontario, she says that it is not a question of science, but rather politics, which has yet to be answered concretely in Canada.

“The science of it is not at all controversial,” she said. “It’s introductory genetics.”

The political question is whether or not the offender’s database should be used for a purpose different than what it was originally established for, Hageman says.

“If you are an offender, you are forced to give your sample to the national DNA data bank," he says. "But does that offender not have some privacy interest in his or her own DNA? And if I am related to someone on the national DNA data bank, do I not have some privacy interest in that relationship?”

According to the office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada — yes, you do.

“While DNA profiles can help solve cold cases as you suggest, and bring emotional closure to victims and families, their collection and retention must respect the highest possible standards of fair balance between security and privacy,” said senior communications adviser Tobi Cohen.

“Familial searching, according to the privacy commissioner, would implicate not only suspects, but innocent family members, ushering in a host of new privacy, ethical and societal issues that would need to be carefully thought through. And the proper protections would need to be in place, before it could be allowed.”

In the eyes of the commissioner, the process would turn family members into "genetic informants" and turn people into suspects, not because of what they have done, but "simply because of to whom they are related."

But, according to Harmon, privacy arguments are often made based on a general lack of understanding of the process.

“The Canadian legal system has a little bit more decorum and dignity than in the U.S., but the concepts are the same. And I can tell you for certain that there is no privacy issue,” he said. “If you look at the results being produced around the U.S., the test is designed to either produce a true relative or nobody.”

Familial testing involves a two-step process. The first step is ordering matches from the most likely to least likely. And the second step is a male hereditary test, which confirms or refutes whether or not anyone on that list is a close relative (father, son, full sibling).

“At the end of this process, in the majority of cases, no one on that list is a match and that’s the end of it,” said Harmon.

In some states, investigators are permitted to run the test a second time six months to a year later, in the case that anyone new who has been added to the list turns up as a match.

In the case of the Grim Sleeper in Los Angeles, Harmon explained the test did not have any positive results the first time around.

But, the second time someone new popped up on the list — and showed investigators that the DNA they were looking into, and the DNA that matched on the offender list were a father and son combination.

“Since we were looking at very old cases, we knew that it couldn’t be the son, because he would have been too young at the time to have committed those crimes,” Harmon said.

Investigators then used this information — lawfully obtained in a sample from a cup the father had used — to get a DNA match and proved the case. He was charged on 10 counts of murder.

“Once a match has been found, police have to work around it in terms of surveillance and lawfully collecting another DNA sample, just like they do in every other case,” Harmon said. “Politicians like to use buzz words and red flags to alert and polarize people. But when you get down to it, they don’t usually actually apply.

"But while bureaucrats come up with reasons to not use it, families of people like Sonia Varaschin sit and wait and hope for answers, when there is a technology available right this moment that could possibly help solve the case.”

jobo

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Re: Sonia Varaschin | 42 | Orangeville | Murder | August 29, 2010 | Part 2
« Reply #1442 on: December 31, 2018, 07:41:32 AM »
They collected 600 samples...wonder how many from the hospital?
Most likely none.

wellwell

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Re: Sonia Varaschin | 42 | Orangeville | Murder | August 29, 2010 | Part 2
« Reply #1443 on: January 01, 2019, 03:34:29 PM »
I just made a comment on one of my news feeds, regarding this UNSOLVED murder of Sonia. I want to hear some updates.
It really isn’t far from my mind...and sorry but you all must know I think it’s someone from the hospital..someone they would not expect..obviously, they don’t suspect, I guess, as they haven’t arrested anyone.
I have to say I’m very impatient on this...cannot imagine what Sonia’s family feels.
I go through Orangeville every few months...very impersonal, highway intersection there...everyone busy trying to get where they’re going...even though around Orangeville is rural...everyone seems in a hurry.

What makes the arrest of Renee Sweeney's alleged murderer so interesting is that the police had a good sample of his DNA for 20 years. They did not have to wait for technology to advance. The DNA sample was a good one from the beginning, and yet her alleged killer evaded detection for two decades.

To learn that this alleged murderer worked as a laboratory technician in an emergency department at a hospital just sets my mind spinning.

It was widely known that Renee's killer had left a good DNA sample. Presumably, a lab tech would know more than the average Joe about how not to leave DNA behind. A lab tech would have access to other people's bodily fluids, containing DNA. Presumably, a phlebotomist in an emergency room would have access to DNA in blood samples of people who later died.

Maybe this alleged murderer never did commit another crime. Or maybe he just got better at leaving a clean crime scene, due to knowledge gained on the job.

If you've ever had to repeat a blood test, the lab never tells you why. Maybe a vial broke or went missing....It makes me wonder now.

Can anyone tell me who takes samples when blood is drawn for police purposes, such as in blood alcohol tests?

Orangeville is known as a bedroom community for Toronto commuters. Bystander syndrome -- don't get involved?

When a lab tech has blood on his or her clothes, who would give it a second thought? Just as when a hunter returns home with bloody clothes.
« Last Edit: January 01, 2019, 03:58:21 PM by wellwell »

wellwell

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Re: Sonia Varaschin | 42 | Orangeville | Murder | August 29, 2010 | Part 2
« Reply #1444 on: January 01, 2019, 04:04:09 PM »
Did Sonia ever have a roommate? Short-or long-term? Did she ever allow someone, maybe a coworker,  to stay at her place, perhaps when the roads were bad in the winter, or after a night out? Did that person have a key, and did they return it?

It's hard to think of anyone who has never had an overnight guest. There was the boyfriend, but we never heard if he had a key.

She lived alone at the time of her death.

jobo

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Re: Sonia Varaschin | 42 | Orangeville | Murder | August 29, 2010 | Part 2
« Reply #1445 on: January 02, 2019, 12:04:55 AM »
Pretty sure I recall, wellwell, that the perp most likely came through the open sliding glass door in the back.
Can anyone confirm that?

D1

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Re: Sonia Varaschin | 42 | Orangeville | Murder | August 29, 2010 | Part 2
« Reply #1446 on: January 03, 2019, 01:07:00 AM »
One of the first crime stories reprinted in the Toronto Star to start this new year:

Quote
Danielle Marr - Almaguin News

Toronto Star - ‎January‎ ‎2‎, ‎2019

Cold-case expert says family DNA tests could widen the net to catch Sonia Varaschin’s killer

Keep up the pressure, eventually she may become a precedent setter..

jobo

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Re: Sonia Varaschin | 42 | Orangeville | Murder | August 29, 2010 | Part 2
« Reply #1447 on: January 06, 2019, 01:34:29 AM »
I’m hoping this is a possibility...family DNA tests.
Prices have come down, too.
We did ours through Ancestry.com and 3rd cousins are coming out of the woodwork...I pass them on to my sister who keeps better genealogy records.
Same on my husbands side....we have been contacted by long lost relatives...

Concerned

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Re: Sonia Varaschin | 42 | Orangeville | Murder | August 29, 2010 | Part 2
« Reply #1448 on: January 07, 2019, 02:05:26 PM »
Was wondering (a bit unrelated to the last couple posts), if Sonia was dating at the time, could there have been a jealous girlfriend/wife of the dates that hired a hit? Any money arrangements or phone activity of those involved with her dates that could cause reason for concern? This would not necessarily be a person from the community that was DNA tested. The door key could have been obtained unknowingly from the boyfriend/husband. Or, remember, there are reports that she use to keep doorwall/door open to let pet out.

If she was dating, was she using a dating site? Any chance a person rejected may have been involved?

Just trying to think out of the box again.

Regarding the geneology records, can a relative of Sonia's request (through proper authorities) a sample to be processed through a geneology search in a state that allows it?


D1

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Re: Sonia Varaschin | 42 | Orangeville | Murder | August 29, 2010 | Part 2
« Reply #1449 on: January 07, 2019, 05:52:31 PM »
Lots of this is true and known. Sonia had been on a dating site in the past..

In regard the dna search. I've tried to find where the law specifically prohibits enhanced dna testing but to no avail. I believe this is a grey area and that we can jump forward very quickly with just a nod from above. It might even be being secretly tested as we speak. The implications and ramifications would need to be looked into closely before the nod will come. Vested interests may pose a temporary hold back but its only a matter of time imo.. We will get there, just have to keep up the pressure. I was quite impressed that the Toronto Star even got in the swing of things right off the bat in the new year.
Check this link out...A Canadian case with enhanced dna testing...  If true, why not Sonia etc???

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/did-cutting-edge-dna-analysis-point-police-to-marrisa-shen-s-killer-1.4906830

Quote

The former lawyer of the man accused of killing 13-year-old Marrisa Shen says investigators used a new form of crime-scene DNA analysis to determine that the girl's killer was likely a man of Middle Eastern descent.

The analysis is called DNA phenotyping — also known as "Snapshot DNA" — and it has provided leads and arrests in several cold cases in the United States by helping investigators predict the appearance or even ethnicity of a suspect.

•Man charged with murder of Marrisa Shen, 13, had no criminal record and was new to Canada

The analysis was used by investigators probing the homicide of Shen, whose body was discovered in a wooded corner in Burnaby's Central Park on July 18, 2017, according to the suspect's former lawyer.

« Last Edit: January 07, 2019, 05:58:39 PM by D1 »

wellwell

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Re: Sonia Varaschin | 42 | Orangeville | Murder | August 29, 2010 | Part 2m
« Reply #1450 on: January 08, 2019, 03:54:23 PM »
Lots of this is true and known. Sonia had been on a dating site in the past..

In regard the dna search. I've tried to find where the law specifically prohibits enhanced dna testing but to no avail. I believe this is a grey area and that we can jump forward very quickly with just a nod from above. It might even be being secretly tested as we speak. The implications and ramifications would need to be looked into closely before the nod will come. Vested interests may pose a temporary hold back but its only a matter of time imo.. We will get there, just have to keep up the pressure. I was quite impressed that the Toronto Star even got in the swing of things right off the bat in the new year.
Check this link out...A Canadian case with enhanced dna testing...  If true, why not Sonia etc???

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/did-cutting-edge-dna-analysis-point-police-to-marrisa-shen-s-killer-1.4906830

Quote

The former lawyer of the man accused of killing 13-year-old Marrisa Shen says investigators used a new form of crime-scene DNA analysis to determine that the girl's killer was likely a man of Middle Eastern descent.

The analysis is called DNA phenotyping — also known as "Snapshot DNA" — and it has provided leads and arrests in several cold cases in the United States by helping investigators predict the appearance or even ethnicity of a suspect.

•Man charged with murder of Marrisa Shen, 13, had no criminal record and was new to Canada

The analysis was used by investigators probing the homicide of Shen, whose body was discovered in a wooded corner in Burnaby's Central Park on July 18, 2017, according to the suspect's former lawyer.

Several cases are jockeying for position in the race for first past the post with new applications for DNA profiles in Canadian criminal justice. The 1998 Sudbury murder of Renee Sweeney is another one of those Parabon DNA clients.

I believe GEDMatch, which is entirely voluntary and public, is a way the matter of familial DNA will be confronted in the courts. It is very much a gray area, and I think it will eventually have to be pushed in front of the Supreme Court of Canada. I’m sure criminals and their lawyers were none too pleased when DNA first began its use in trials.

I’ve said before that I can imagine some people with suspicions about sketchy relatives putting their own DNA on GEDMatch in the hope justice will catch up to them.

It is helpful to police that voluntarily-submitted DNA from missing persons cases is now being entered into criminal DNA registries. This opens the door for the use of voluntarily-submitted familial DNA to be used from websites like GEDMatch. The day is coming, IMO.

I wish the investigators in Sonia’s case would hire Parabon. That is, if they have any DNA, which I am seriously beginning to doubt. What are they afraid of? Sudbury police were diligent for Renee Sweeney.


wellwell

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Re: Sonia Varaschin | 42 | Orangeville | Murder | August 29, 2010 | Part 2
« Reply #1451 on: February 03, 2019, 11:03:07 AM »
A house exploded on Maple Grove Road in Caledon today,  killing one person. Nearby houses were damaged, and residents have been evacuated. The cause is undetermined at present.

This occurred just a few minutes away from where Sonia was found. Posting this for the record as it is highly unusual.

https://toronto.citynews.ca/2019/02/03/house-explosion-caledon-village/

From another article:

"One person is dead after police say an explosion “obliterated” a home in Caledon early this morning...

"Members of the OPP’s search and rescue team, as well as the Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosives unit, are currently on scene."

https://toronto.ctvnews.ca/mobile/one-dead-after-house-explosion-in-caledon-1.4280668

Also for the record, here's what's been going on along the rural roads near Caledon recently -- dumping of toxic waste from illicit drug labs. This is happening very close to the location where Sonia was found.

https://www.caledonenterprise.com/news-story/8327873-map-here-s-where-hazardous-waste-has-been-dumped-in-caledon/

In case you're wondering, illicit drug labs were operating in the Caledon area around the time od Sonia's murder in 2010.

https://www.caledonenterprise.com/news-story/1369755-police-raid-crystal-meth-lab-near-palgrave/

https://www.caledon.ca/en/business/growopsclandestinelabs.asp
« Last Edit: February 03, 2019, 12:26:49 PM by wellwell »

jobo

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Re: Sonia Varaschin | 42 | Orangeville | Murder | August 29, 2010 | Part 2
« Reply #1452 on: February 03, 2019, 06:48:05 PM »
I was just saying today...hmmm lots of weird deaths around that area...
Pretty sure I recall another explosion..maybe a year or two ago?

wellwell

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Re: Sonia Varaschin | 42 | Orangeville | Murder | August 29, 2010 | Part 2
« Reply #1453 on: February 04, 2019, 05:32:01 PM »
I was just saying today...hmmm lots of weird deaths around that area...
Pretty sure I recall another explosion..maybe a year or two ago?

Yes, that's right. There was another one, when a man was treated for hand injuries. No deaths in that one, though.

About the one yesterday:

https://www.caledonenterprise.com/news-story/9157587-victim-identified-in-caledon-village-house-explosion/

wellwell

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Re: Sonia Varaschin | 42 | Orangeville | Murder | August 29, 2010 | Part 2
« Reply #1454 on: February 04, 2019, 05:40:58 PM »
Would it interest anyone to know about a member of the Caledon equestrian community arrested and charged with an assortment of violent offences in 2017 while out of the country? Alcohol was involved. I don't know if this person was present in the area in 2010, but he spent several years there.