Author Topic: Victoria "Tori" Stafford - 8 - Murdered April 8, 2009 Woodstock, On - Part 2  (Read 118390 times)

D1

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Which is likely his defence strategy.

jellybean

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Will McClintic be brought in as a witness?? - Or will her credibility be jeopordized because she is now a criminal and has a checkered past?

JB

capeheart

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She is an eye witness to the murder, McClintic. They would definitely be calling her, I would imagine as a star witness. Most of the preliminary setup for the trial is on now. They will possibly be calling their first witnesses tomorrow. I do hope we get updates as much as possible on what is happening in the trial. Thanks for the updates so far. :o :o :o :o


eyeswideopen

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not sure if the link I posted this morning for the live  trial updates on its own so I reposted it.
http://live.citynews.ca/Event/Francis_DSouza_and_Cynthia_Mulligan_are_live_in_London_Ont

capeheart

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I just had the news on now related to Tori's first day of the trial. It was stated that McClintic is going to be called as a witness. And can you imagine the lawyer there on the news, talking as if this bastard was just some kind of person that is being unjustly charged. I don't get this guy, he'd better watch his back. Oh, that drives me crazy. Even though I know everyone is entitled to a defense in court, this lawyer should not say anything to the public, if he has any scruples at all. Tori's mother is also going to give testimony this week. So it is going to be very heartbreaking for those to hear what happened to her. They indicated that she had been hit with a hammer on the skull. Also that her ribs were crushed. So horrifying of a story and they are only on the first day. God bless everyone that is going to have to listen and hear the trial. I myself have sat in on murder trials and you are spellbound by what is happening. Of course, it was my job to record it. I did like my job, because it was interesting, but sometimes you had to hear horrible stories.  Sometimes you were just spellbound by the evidence. And that is what these people will be, spellbound by the horrific things that happened to a little girl and then have to weigh their evidence as to guilty or not guilty.
:o :o :o :o :o :o
« Last Edit: March 05, 2012, 09:12:39 PM by capeheart »

Sleuth

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Sleuth

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And here is how the Crown will be laying out the case.............


Tori Stafford beaten to death with hammer, court hears

RANDY RICHMOND, QMI AGENCY

FIRST POSTED: MONDAY, MARCH 05, 2012 09:47 AM EST | UPDATED: MONDAY, MARCH 05, 2012 09:28 PM EST

 

LONDON, ONT. - Electronic evidence and disturbing testimony will take jurors on the same path a school girl took from an ordinary day of small hopes to a brutal death from "repeated hammer blows to the head," Crown attorney Kevin Gowdey said Monday.

"This trial will travel down a long road," Gowdey told the jury of nine women and three men at the first-degree murder trial of Michael Thomas Rafferty, 31, in London.

"This is a difficult story to tell and it will be a difficult story for you to hear."

Victoria (Tori) Stafford, 8, walked out of school hoping to see a movie with friends on April 8, 2009, but "130 kilometres away from her home, was killed and left in a pile of rocks wearing only her Hannah Montana T-shirt and nothing else," Gowdey said. "She was naked from the waist down.

The girl was sexually assaulted. Before being struck on the head with a claw hammer, she was beaten so severely her liver was lacerated and ribs broken, he said.

Cellphone records and cell tower mapping, video surveillance clips, DNA and photographic evidence will fill in the story of Tori's last day, with much of the personal testimony provided by the woman who lured Tori to her death.

Terri-Lynne McClintic, 21, pleaded guilty in 2010 to first-degree murder.

"You will unquestionably be disturbed by the choices she made with Mr. Rafferty," Gowdey warned jurors.

McClintic told different versions of what happened to police, and Gowdey said he expected her credibility to be raised at the trial.

But jurors don't have to determine which actions Rafferty and McClintic took individually, only that together they killed Tori, said Gowdey as he neared his quietly dramatic ending to an opening delivered in measured, sombre tones.

"Your task will be to decide whether they acted together when they picked up Tori..., whether they acted together when they ... bought the garbage bags and the hammer, whether they acted together when they took Tori to an isolated location where all of her clothing was removed but her T-shirt, whether they acted together to bring about the sexual assault of Tori, whether they acted together when Tori was killed, when she was placed in garbage bags and when heavy rocks were placed on top of her."

Outside court, Rafferty's lawyer, Dirk Derstine, called the Crown's dramatic opening statement fair, but incomplete.

"I expect that the picture that will emerge through the course of the trial, there will be things in there that were certainly not covered by that (opening)," he said. "It's not surprising one party paints a picture very much in their favour."

The first day of the much-anticipated trial began slowly, with Justice Thomas Heeney's opening remarks followed by a long in-camera discussion among lawyers.

Rafferty listened to the Crown's opening statement without expression, sitting motionless in a grey suit, light-coloured shirt and striped tie.

Tori's family members maintained a stoic and unified front during several warnings of horrible evidence to come. All wore purple ribbons and some wore items of purple clothing.

Purple was Tori's favourite colour.

Her grandmother, Doreen Graichen, wore a butterfly pendant bought after the girl's death, in memory of the girl's love of butterflies.

The family has been bracing for three years for this trial, she told reporters outside court.

"I don't think I can ever say I'm prepared to hear it," she said, but added, "Nothing can be any worse than what I imagined all along anyway."

Tori's father, Rodney Stafford, told reporters he was finding it difficult that more people seem to be aware of Rafferty's name than his own daughter's.

"It's not about Rafferty. It's about a little girl who lost her life."

Gowdey, a veteran Crown, began his opening by showing jurors a school photograph of Tori taken the day before she was killed. He then showed photos of Tori, McClintic and Rafferty on the same computer screen.

"The case is about how the lives of three people intersected that day," he said.

Gowdey first explained how the Crown sees the story of Tori's last day and provided a brief road map of the evidence.

This is the story, according to the Crown:

On April 8, 2009, Rafferty drove his car, a Honda Civic, along Fyfe Ave., in Woodstock, Ont., past Oliver Stephens public school to a nearby nursing home.

McClintic walked Tori to that nursing home, where the girl got in the car.

The two adults drove Tori to Guelph, Ont., where Rafferty visited a friend and bought "a large number" of painkillers.

The pair then went to a Petro Canada gas station in the north end of Guelph, where a video camera caught Rafferty heading to the ATM machine. He took out cash, got back in the car and drove closer to a nearby Home Depot.

McClintic went in and paid cash at the self-serve for garbage bags and a hammer.

"She picked out a hammer from a display in the store, a claw hammer," Gowdey said.

McClintic then put the hammer and bags in the trunk, and the pair drove away. Rafferty knows the area well from working there and because he has family in the region, Gowdey said. They drove to a remote spot near Mount Forest, Ont., where Tori was raped and killed.

After the killing, the pair continued to stay in touch by phone and in person. McClintic kept a journal "which you may conclude is a script for Terri-Lynne McClintic if she was ever accused," Gowdey said.

McClintic was arrested and taken into custody on another matter April 12. Rafferty continued to visit her in London's Genest detention centre.

Police questioned Rafferty May 15 and noticed his Honda Civic seemed similar to the one in the video, but had no back seat. After the interview, police later learned, Rafferty spent the weekend contacting auto wreckers and rental agencies about getting another car. He also went to Masonville Place in London to get a new BlackBerry.

McClintic confessed May 19 to being the woman who lured Tori away, and Rafferty was arrested the same day.

Police seized his vehicle and found evidence of Tori's blood on the rear passenger door moulding. Blood found on a Goodlife fitness bag inside the car was a mixture of Tori and Rafferty's blood.

"Listen carefully to the DNA evidence. It will tell you a lot," Gowdey said.

First-degree murder can be a planned and deliberate killing, a killing during a kidnapping or a killing during a sexual assault, Gowdey explained to the jury.

A person can be guilty by either committing the killing or helping another person do it, he added.

The Crown's case will proceed in chapters, Gowdey said:

Chapter 1: The day of the kidnapping. The surveillance video showing Rafferty driving up the street outside Tori's school and McClintic walking Tori up the street. Witnesses from and around Oliver Stephens public school will talk about seeing Tori. An identification officer will use photographs and maps to show the route from Woodstock to Guelph.

Tori's mother, Tara McDonald, will testify about the frantic hours the family spent looking for Tori.

"As hard as that will be for her and for us, unfortunately it is necessary," Gowdey said.

Chapter 2: Terri-Lynne McClintic. "She was an essential part of all that happened," Gowdey said. "I expect her credibility will be a major issue in this case."

Chapter 3: Guelph: Video surveillance and bank records detailing the events there.

Chapter 4: The Mount Forest death scene, which the jury will visit. "It will be difficult to go the very place where this happened, I know that, but understanding the crime scene is crucial to understanding the crime," Gowdey said. Photographs, some of them graphic, will be used to explain "exactly how the killing happened."

"Unfortunately it is only through them that you can fully understand (the) evidence," Gowdey said.

Chapter 5: Police interaction with Rafferty.

Chapter 6: The searches of Rafferty and McClintic's residences and the evidence found.

Chapter 7: The Honda Civic. What was found inside.

Chapter 8: Rafferty's connection to the Mount Forest area.

Chapter 9: Comments Rafferty made to friends after April 8. "He had some interesting things to say to other people about Terri-Lynne McClintic and about the kidnapping itself," Gowdey said.

Chapter 10: The May 15 weekend and Rafferty's actions.

Chapter 11: The BlackBerry. "You will see who he called, when and where he was when he made the calls," Gowdey said. The BlackBerry allowed police to track his movements April 8 and after.

Chapter 12: A recap of the surveillance video

The trial continues Tuesday.

randy.richmond@sunmedia.ca

twitter.com/RandyRatLFPress

http://www.torontosun.com/2012/03/05/tori-stafford-murder-trial-gets-underway




capeheart

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Tori's father is absolutely correct. Do not even think of the bastard's name, think of the terrible horror that a beautiful little girll had to go through before she died. The jury should be focused on the viciousness and brutality and the senseless murder of a child. Never mind this bastard getting weepy in the courtroom when he hears the terrible stuff he did. He is acting, because his lawyer is probably telling him, you better shed a few tears to show you have some emotion. We are focused on justice for Tori, what is the court going to do to make sure this is never going to happen again. This is one time we should have the death penalty, I'm for bringing it back. It doesn't get any worse then this, this is outrageous criminal behaviour and a senseless act towards an innocent little girl. The heartbreak that will go on every minute of this trial, that the family has to listen to will be unbearable. God bless the parents and friends who knew Tori.
      Does this snake really think that he can slither out of this one. :o :o :o :o :o

jellybean

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It is for these types of crimes, where I am now beginning to believe that the death penalty would be warranted.  Oops, we don't have a death penalty. Well then, give them Life.   oops  Life is  only 25 years.

JB

capeheart

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Yes and life should be life, until he breaths his last breath. Hopefully when he is sentenced somebody will do him in while he is incarcerated.I just hate to think about the defense in this case, you know they will say he was on liquor and drugs and he was disassociated with what was going on. This is when I feel the people there will just go bananas, at this trial. We just pray that everything goes well and that the family holds up. It is about little Tori losing her life and that is what the focus should be on. Not whether Rafferty is wearing glasses or a suit or whatever. He should be in orange jumpsuit and shackles on, because that was how he was arrested. He should not be able to go to court in a Value Village suit. It will be a long haul for everyone and my prayers are with them. :'( :'( :'( :'( :'(

rainstorm

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I think Canada need to get a death penalty. And more the life 25 years really? how about 100years. No sunlight, Alone in a dark hole.
Then I think some of these snakes need torture, no food. Treat them like they treated there innocent victims. I know inhumane. But think about this. Did they think it was inhumane when the victim was found. no they thought oh crap. Are they sorry?  maybe There are no amounts of I am sorry to bring back a sweet child.

I am a mother of almost 3. I have a 10 year old boy who walks to and from school. He only started to do so. My 1 yr old is just learning no and how to walk better. My 3rd is in the oven. When I was 10 life was so different. I am 34 now. In all honesty I wonder what case will get Canada to harden up their laws. I like some of the states laws.