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Author Topic: Lenny Hikomak - Kugluktuk, Nunavut - May 25, 2006 - MISSING  (Read 2831 times)

BCID

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Lenny Hikomak - Kugluktuk, Nunavut - May 25, 2006 - MISSING
« on: March 10, 2012, 11:38:41 AM »
June 2, 2006
http://www.nunatsiaq.com/news/nunavut/briefs.html

Two Kugluktuk hunters missing, presumed dead

Two Kugluktuk hunters are presumed dead after a search last week found their snowmobile, but no sign of the men.

Lenny Hikomak, 33, and Gregory Havioyak, 21, were last seen during the afternoon of Thursday, May 25, travelling in front of the community and heading back into town.

But they never came home, police were told later that afternoon.

The next day a search party recovered their snowmobile, near a patch of open water. Shortly afterwards the search was called off due to dangerously thin ice conditions.



http://www.cbc.ca/canada/north/story/2006/...ings-names.html

RCMP release names of drowned Kugluktuk men
Last Updated: Thursday, June 1, 2006 | 10:39 AM CT
CBC News

RCMP in Kugluktuk say a father of six young children is one of two men presumed to have drowned last Thursday outside the community.

Lenny Hikomak and Gregory Havioyak are presumed dead after their snow machine broke through the sea ice while the pair were on a hunting trip, says Kugluktuk RCMP Corp. Denise Keatley.

Their bodies have not yet been recovered.

Hikomak, 33, leaves behind six children and his common-law wife. The couple had Nunavut's first triplets two years ago.

Hikomak was a water truck driver at the hamlet.

Havioyak, 21, is the son of Kitikmeot Inuit Association president Donald Havioyak.

He had just returned to Kugluktuk after a year at Nunavut Sivuniksavut, a college program offered in Ottawa, and planned to work for the Tahera Diamond Corporation this summer.

Keatley says the search for the bodies will continue when more of the ocean ice melts.



http://www.nunatsiaq.com/archives/60602/ne...vut/briefs.html

Two Kugluktuk hunters missing, presumed dead

Two Kugluktuk hunters are presumed dead after a search last week found their snowmobile, but no sign of the men.

Lenny Hikomak, 33, and Gregory Havioyak, 21, were last seen during the afternoon of Thursday, May 25, travelling in front of the community and heading back into town.

But they never came home, police were told later that afternoon.

The next day a search party recovered their snowmobile, near a patch of open water. Shortly afterwards the search was called off due to dangerously thin ice conditions.



http://www.sikunews.com/art.html?artid=1472&catid=19

Warm weather brings risky ice, lots of water
[19.06.06 22:11]

Four hunters in Nunavut died this spring while attempting to "water-skip" their snowmobiles across gaps of open water between land and ice.

Four hunters in Nunavut died this spring while attempting to "water-skip" their snowmobiles across gaps of open water between land and ice, reports the Northern News Service.

In May, Gregory Havioyak and Lenny Hikomak drowned while trying to cross to solid ground near the mouth of the Coppermine River. Police found Havioyak's body only last week and Hikomak remains missing.

Last week, 28-year-old Allistair Peryouar and 54-year-old Aoudla Pudlat died while skipping their snowmobile near Baker Lake.

RCMP Cpl. Randy Slawson based in Iqaluit said melting ice makes spring a risky season for hunters.

"They want to push the hunting season as long as they can and they're crossing open spaces of water," he said.

Const. Dyson Smith of the Kugluktuk RCMP said a strong current near the mouth of the Coppermine River makes it dangerous to cross in front of the town. He said police try to encourage hunters to cross their snowmobiles near the government dock, where the ice is closer to shore.

Jack Himiak, chair of the Kugluktuk Hunters and Trappers and the local search and rescue committee, said Havioyak and Hikomak were crossing closer to the river because it was also closer to home. The river also brings silt and deadwood that make sea ice weaker once it starts to melt.

"We have to warn the hunters of the ice conditions, but this was just rotten ice," Himiak said. "(Havioyak and Hikomak) weren't really aware of how fast the ice was going."

Slawson said most water-skippers aren't doing it for fun but because they have to. And while police try to discourage the practice, Slawson acknowledges that sometimes it's just a fact of life in the North.

It's not uncommon to see Nunavummiut running their snowmobiles across open water no matter where you are in the territory, sometimes for sport.

"They do it a lot in Coral Harbour," said Leroy Nakoolak, who was a long-time resident of the Kivalliq community before moving to Baffin Island six months ago. "I've done it myself."

On the lake behind Coral's hamlet garage, he said people would gather to race two or three machines at a time in circles after the ice had melted each year.

"If someone is in front of you, you just have to watch that you don't hit them," he said. "There were never any injuries, but a few of the machines got water in them and never worked properly again."

Eeta Nakashuk of Pangnirtung thinks if people want to drive across the water they should buy a boat.

"It's pretty cool to watch," she said. "But I'd never want to do it myself."

BCID

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Re: Lenny Hikomak - Kugluktuk, Nunavut - May 25, 2006 - MISSING
« Reply #1 on: March 10, 2012, 11:39:19 AM »
Background Information:

http://www.capitalhealth.ca/NewsAndEvents/...st_Triplets.htm

Nunavut's First Triplets

Jul 9, 2004
Joanne Kokak remembers clearly the moment when she discovered she was expecting triplets. However, little did she realize that when the trio made their entrance into the world at the Royal Alexandra Hospital in Edmonton on May 22nd that they'd be the first triplets of Nunavut, following the creation of the territory on April 1st, 1999.

"I was shocked. I didn't know whether to cry or scream," she says as she lovingly cradles daughter Sophie in her arms. However, both Joanne and her husband Lenny Hikomak are smiling now.

They're excited about the idea of taking their three new bundles of joy - Sophie, Gracie and Faith -- home to Kugluktuk to show off, particularly to their three other children - Recas, Tara Jane and Cassie. The three older children have been staying with family since mom and dad left home in mid-May to come to Edmonton for a routine appointment and ended up staying.

Kugluktuk is a community of about 1,300 residents on the shores of the Arctic Ocean northeast of Yellowknife. Residents from Kugluktuk and other communities in the NWT and Nunavut routinely travel to Edmonton for specialized health services, in this case high-risk obstetrical services, unavailable in the North. Capital Health provides these services through the Northern Health Services Network which includes a team of nurses - all with experience working and living in Canada's North - who are available to provide support and assistance to northern residents in Edmonton for health services.

Joanne and Lenny first learned they were expecting triplets about four months into the pregnancy when Joanne went to Yellowknife for an ultrasound. She laughs when she remembers phoning her husband to tell him they were expecting triplets.

"He said are you sure? I said yeah and he was quiet for the longest time. I said hello, hello are you still there? I thought he'd fainted," she says. "He just asked are you sure again? I said yes we're having three babies and he was quiet again. I thought for sure he'd fainted."

For his part, Lenny says he was just trying to absorb the news. He then quickly shared his good news with his family, starting with his mother-in-law. "She'd dreamed of having a baby girl two or three days before and so I told her she'd now get her baby girl," he says. Inuit culture provides for the adoption of babies to family members through custom adoptions and Joanne and Lenny have agreed to give baby Sophie to Joanne's mom.

The three girls are all doing well. Faith (2 pounds, 9 ounces at birth) and Gracie (2 pounds, 12 ounces at birth) have gained about two pounds each since birth. Sophie weighed in at 3 pounds, 2 ounces at birth and now weighs 5 pounds, 11 ounces.

The triplets complete the Nunavut couple's family. "Our fourth child turned into four, five and six," says Joanne with a chuckle.

The couple will remain in Edmonton until the girls are feeding on their own and then they'll probably go to the Stanton Hospital in Yellowknife before making the final trek home to Kugluktuk and family and friends.



http://www.nnsl.com/yir/yir04/yirnun04.html

Nunavut's first triplets born

A Kugluktuk couple who gave birth to Nunavut's first triplets in an Edmonton hospital told Nunavut News/North they couldn't wait to come home.

Joanne Kokak and Lenny Hikomak welcomed babies Gracie, Sophie and Faith into the world on May 22. The babies were born prematurely, and by the time Lenny and Joanne spoke to Nunavut News/North the babies were getting bigger and doing just fine.

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Re: Lenny Hikomak - Kugluktuk, Nunavut - May 25, 2006 - MISSING
« Reply #2 on: March 10, 2012, 11:54:37 AM »
That's really sad  :'(
6 children and a wife without a father/ husband