Author Topic: Cody Ridge Wolfe, missing May 1, 2011, Muskowekwan First Nation, Lestock, SK  (Read 15049 times)

jellybean

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I don't know Eyes.  This was a house. I don't think he ever made it to the house.   He was not on the reserve. Besides, he may have been hallucinating  (this strange house)- through hypothermia. The weather was against him all of the way.
Conclusion?  He should of stayed at Grandmas. Young people do not think ahead at times, it is for the moment.
God bless his family.And kudos to the RCMP for their continuing search for this young man.

JB
« Last Edit: November 27, 2011, 06:01:18 PM by jellybean »

SAP

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The
family plans to search the area along a grid road north of Lestock, the
route the RCMP believe Wolfe travelled the night of April 29
www.saskcrimestoppers.com.Muskowekwan is located about 150 kilometres northeast of Regina.
Read more: http://www.leaderpost.com/news/Family+calls+volunteers+help+search+missing+teen/4891947/story.html#ixzz1OHVESjZC

D1

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from the earlier news articles-
http://justice4caylee.forumotion.net/t12714-canada-cody-ridge-wolfe-17-regina-sk

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Wolfe, 17, planned on walking eight kilometres in the dark to another home
on the reserve. Mounties believe he never reached his destination.

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He is texting a friend and trying to get to this residence to meet his friend.

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she said.

This is not the first time the family has had a family member go missing.

jellybean

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He went on foot to meet a friend. His grandmother let him go. No talk of a ride.
And another family member disappeared in the bush.
To my mind D1, it is called "Risk", they live it everytime they venture out.  This is not part of my culture, so I assume out of 1,000 people doing the same thing everyday, they arrive safely to their destination, but at times, things go wrong. I would sure like to hear from the family to "set the record straight" on all of this.  They would have the first hand knowledge.  They know the area, and it's potential for disaster when nature pounces upon them .
I can sit in my home, and the sun is shining, and the next minute a heavy snow storm.
However, I don't have to go out and walk in it, nor would I think of going out in it. I have a choice.
In any event, it is tragic. 

JB
« Last Edit: November 27, 2011, 10:25:11 PM by jellybean »

D1

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Quote
This is not part of my culture, so I assume out of 1,000 people doing the same thing everyday, they arrive safely to their destination,

OK, but why then? Why in the middle of the night. How often would he or anyone do that? Eight kms for what? What lured him out to walk that far on that particular night?
and...

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The circumstance was unusual, not customary.

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Big difference if he met with and was with someone before his disappearance and not all alone. The comment was made by family member for a reason imo.

That would make more sense to me. But would be nice to know more details, otherwise the search will continue on in the same place, same area again and again, always seeking always doubting.
« Last Edit: November 28, 2011, 01:54:10 AM by D1 »

jellybean

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You hit the nail on the head, of which I was alluding to in the first place.  Why in the middle of the night? Why not stay at Grandmas?  Makes no sense.

One of my son's went out to the outskirts of the city to visit a friend, and he didn't feel comfortable being there, as to what was going on, so he left in the midst of a snow storm and went directly to Grandpa and grandma's and spent the night. My parents lived about one mile away.   He was 16 at the time. He did the right thing, and was able to make it to my parents place, in a blinding snow storm.  Later my son told me that he could barely see, were it not for his grandparents porch  light on  he would never have  found their home.   Meanwhile back at my  home, I thought that my son would be safe with his friend to spend the night there until I got the call from my parents.  He was given hot chocolate, a wam bed and love and safety.

Kids get themselves into a pickle, and at times they need a guardian angel.
One was with my son that night, and so were my parents.

I said to him, as I picked him up from my folks the next day,  "Next time call me, and I will come and get you" , and he replied that he did not want to wait - he wanted to get out of there.

Come to think of it, the snow storm was so bad, I doubt if I could have driven down the highway. But, I didn't feel that way at the time.

In finding out why my son left, I was relieved that he chose to do so, but he had to face the weather elements and he was fortunate that he was able to walk that far and for so long.

JB
« Last Edit: November 27, 2011, 11:30:49 PM by jellybean »

raisinpie

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It was the last Friday night of the Easter Break school holiday.  Cody's Mom dropped him off at Grandma's, they went to the Muskowekwan FN on a regular basis. Mom Annette is from Muskowekwan FN, they were regular, perhaps weekly visitors to the FN from the rural off reserve home. It was Friday night and he was planning to meet friends and all knew and agreed that that was ok.  He knew the area very well, although, he had not been to that particular house prior. It is not unusual for people to walk from point A to point B on First Nations and youth will stay up beyond our normal adult sleep hours as most of us probably know and probably did in our youth.  Many youth do not have cars on First Nations so they walk to visit friends.  The reports stated he left after 10:30-11:00pm, and it's not unusual to go from one friend's place to another.  He may have not made the best choice that evening.  There seems to be a theme of "its his fault" on this thread.

When there was no contact at the agreed upon time on Saturday, April 30, he was then reported missing Sunday night, May 1, to the RCMP.

@ jellybean's post, Nov 27 @ 10:16pm.  Yes there is another family member missing.  The two cases are in no way related. It is just bad luck that there happens to be 2 missing in this family.   There are other families with multiple missing persons, although, not that many. 

Good job on coming up with other perspectives.

SAP

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Excerpt from first article on page 1:

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Leader-Post May 3, 2011   The RCMP in Punnichy is seeking the public's help in locating 17year-old Cody Ridge Wolfe, who has not been seen since Friday.

Wolfe was last seen leaving his grandmother's house on the Muskowekwan First Nation at 10: 30 p.m. when he set out for another residence that was approximately eight kilometres away.

Investigators do not believe Wolfe ever reached his destination, but there have been no other sightings.

Wolfe is of First Nations ancestry, is 5-foot-7 and weighs 110 pounds. He has shoulder-length black hair, brown eyes and has a scar between his nose and upper lip. He was last seen wearing a black jacket, blue sweater, blue jeans and white running shoes.

Wolfe was reported missing at 9: 15 p.m. on Sunday.

He left his grandma's late evening on a Friday. No one would have thought anything of it as it was the weekend and teens are always going out, whether they have to walk or not. Except the weather was very unstable and very hazardous.
He was texting with friends so if something untoward had happened to him prior to when the texting started, would he not have told his friends what was going on or what had happened? Perhaps he had hitchhiked and someone dropped him off in unfamiliar territory? He knew the First nation well but he was unfamiliar with where he was. Was it because of beginning to succumb to the cold?
What do teens do when they get together on a weekend ...   

SAP

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Oh raisinpie, I am in no way blaming Cody for what went wrong. I am blaming no one. He pulls at my heartstrings. My own son will sometimes go out in the late evening but he doesn't have to walk far. I know teens will find a way to go out no matter where they are as they need that friend time and weather doesn't stop them. It breaks my heart that he may have succumbed to harsh weather all alone.

raisinpie

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RCMP have been concerned that he may have been hypothermic.  By the way, it is a slough that became a big lake which flooded the main road.  If you Google Lestock, you will see the grid road north of Lestock which Cody was walking.  There is no big raging river on that First Nation.  Dont know about you people, but I recall going out on stormy nights when I was young, but then I probably wasn't walking.  He, in all likelihood, misjudged how far he had to go.

raisinpie

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The only other information in October was that the family was holding fundraisings for search funds for Cody.  I have not seen any other update from the police... they have been silent.  I think that there was only 1 or maybe 2 news interviews with the RCMP.  Family is heartbroken of course.  Maybe people have ideas as to what they can do next.

jellybean

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Raisinpie: I think that you have it right.  I gave you my personal story of my son. It can happen so easily. Mother Nature is not always so motherly.
There is no way that anyone can out  talk a 17 year old in staying indoors, when they want to go.
It is as simple as that.
Living in the bush has its dangers, and i am sure that family members are lost because of it!! Nature at times, shows little mercy.

With that being said this is of little consolation to his parents who love him so dearly and pine for his return.
My heart goes out to them, it truly does. I don't know how they can resolve this within their hearts, but my greatest hope for them is that someday they will be able to accept it, and remember their Cody for the lovely young man that God gave to them for those 17 years, and feel blessed that they had him within their midst, and that now he is with God and perhaps doing in heaven whatever Cody did here on earth, and place a smile on someone's lips.
Peace
JB

« Last Edit: November 28, 2011, 01:43:36 AM by jellybean »

SAP

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RCMP have been concerned that he may have been hypothermic.  By the way, it is a slough that became a big lake which flooded the main road.  If you Google Lestock, you will see the grid road north of Lestock which Cody was walking.  There is no big raging river on that First Nation.  Dont know about you people, but I recall going out on stormy nights when I was young, but then I probably wasn't walking.  He, in all likelihood, misjudged how far he had to go.


My sincere apologies Raisinpie. If I had tons of time I would have googled the area. I did ask earlier up page about the area but no one answered my question. The cop or someone mentioned a river.

What is it you want? Those of us who have posted are not from Saskatchewan. You were sounding disappointed and upset that no one continued on Cody's thread and and you also seem to be upset that we've made mistakes in the terrain of the area as well as the weather, which by the way was all laid out in the articles and interviews.

As far as going out on stormy nights, yes, but the pictures and the way persons interviewed talked made it sound worse, especially the relatives. This is what was said about that night ... 
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The night Wolfe went missing a blizzard hit parts of the province.
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Dont know about you people, but I recall going out on stormy nights when I was young

Stormy weather is one thing; blizzard with washed out roads is another.

I'm sorry Cody has not been found alive; and sorry he was alone in a time of need. My heart goes out to his family and relatives as I know it's a long struggle for answers that are not there.

I have nothing more to say on the matter b/c I simply don't know Saskatchewan and its terrain and the weather at the time, nor any of the friends who may hold the answers.

« Last Edit: November 28, 2011, 04:04:11 PM by SAP »

jellybean

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Quote Raisinpie:

There seems to be a theme of "its his fault" on this thread.
Unquote:

Not true! We came on and gave our perspective.  That is what we do here.
If we didn't, this thread would sit here empty.

SAP has given possibilities as to what may have happened to him in the elements, and so have I.

No one has blamed his family.  As I said, you cannot tell a 17 year old to stay home because the weather is bad.

Thanks for filling us on that evening, and how FN youngsters walk from home to home to visit on a Friday nite.
In all fairness, your information would have served us all if it had been forthcoming initially. But, for whatever reason, you were unable to do so. I am thinking that you did not "hold it back", but that you have recently learned of the situation surrounding Cody that evening.

Please forward my deepest condolences to his family.

It is basic, Cody lost his life to the elements, and the the RCMP are doing their best to locate his remains, to return him home to his family. I pray that they are successful.

Take care Raisinpie.
Keep us informed if you can.

JB

« Last Edit: November 28, 2011, 02:43:59 PM by jellybean »

D1

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from raisinpie-
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It was the last Friday night of the Easter Break school holiday.  Cody's Mom dropped him off at Grandma's, they went to the Muskowekwan FN on a regular basis. Mom Annette is from Muskowekwan FN, they were regular, perhaps weekly visitors to the FN from the rural off reserve home. It was Friday night and he was planning to meet friends and all knew and agreed that that was ok.  He knew the area very well, although, he had not been to that particular house prior. It is not unusual for people to walk from point A to point B on First Nations and youth will stay up beyond our normal adult sleep hours as most of us probably know and probably did in our youth.  Many youth do not have cars on First Nations so they walk to visit friends.  The reports stated he left after 10:30-11:00pm, and it's not unusual to go from one friend's place to another.  He may have not made the best choice that evening.  There seems to be a theme of "its his fault" on this thread.
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Did not everyone know that the road was washed out when making plans to meet at that residence? Not blaming, just asking.

Average walking speed for a young male is about -
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Although walking speeds can vary greatly depending on factors such as height, weight, age, terrain, surface, load, culture, effort, and fitness, the average human walking speed is about 5.0 kilometres per hour (km/h), or about 3.1 miles per hour (mph). Specific studies have found pedestrian walking speeds ranging from 4.51 km/h to 4.75 km/h for older individuals to 5.32 km/h to 5.43 km/h for younger individuals.

Along the 8 k.m. route, I am assuming there were other residences where Cody could have stopped awhile? Then continued on at the later time frame, maybe even getting a ride? A vehicle would not have made it through the washed out area.

Cody's phone went dead, and has never been located either. Did his friends try and text him back after 2:30 and what was the response message? Did the texts go through or was the phone shut off or non responsive? Did the phone company ping his phone and what was the result? Even if he were somewhat intoxicated and or hypothermic as has been suggested, his texts should still truthfully say where he was last and on which route. Why has he not been found, the area is specific and is not that large? Maybe the searchers are close? or? 

Seems there is some speculation he was with someone earlier who has not come forward. The timing suggests that may be true.

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LaPlante hopes someone comes forward who can provide information about

There is possibly something unknown here that may be of importance. We don't know any of that and aren't able to be of much assistance here really. If the searchers have been thorough, the unknown circumstance should be explored in depth by those close to Cody. jmo

Whatever the case, Cody just needs to be found. Best wishes to family and searchers.
« Last Edit: November 28, 2011, 02:45:48 PM by D1 »