Author Topic: Amber Redman - July 15, 2005 - Age: 19 ? Missing - Fort Qu'Appelle  (Read 6001 times)

Desespere

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Amber Redman
Age: 19
DOB: Jan 30, 1986
Missing
Date last seen: July 15, 2005
Location last seen: Fort Qu?Appelle, SK

Amber Redman - July 15, 2005 - Age: 19 ? Missing - Fort Qu'Appelle - DOB: Jan 30, 1986 Location last seen: Fort Qu?Appelle, SK Eyes: Brown Hair: Brown  Height: 5'8" 173 cm Case number: 3155SR Amber Tara-Lynn REDMAN  Race: Aboriginal Descent Gender: Female Height: 170 cm (5'7") Weight: 57 kg (126 lbs) Hair Color: Brown Eye Color: Brown Distinguishing Features: Unknown Clothing Worn at time of disapearance: Blue denim jeans, a blue denim jean shirt and blue earrings in the shape of a heart and two feathers. File #: 2005-427916 Agency: RCMP - Regina Additional Information:
On the 15th of July, 2005, Amber REDMAN, 19 years old, was last seen in Fort Qu?Appelle, SK at approximately 2:00 a.m. She has not been seen since this date. Extensive searches of Fort Qu?Appelle and surrounding area have not been successful in locating Amber REDMAN.
« Last Edit: November 22, 2007, 12:48:27 PM by Desespere »

Chris

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http://www.cbc.ca/canada/saskatchewan/story/2008/05/05/amber-redman.html

Arrest made in 2005 case of missing teen
Human remains believed to be those of an aboriginal teen who went missing in Saskatchewan nearly three years ago have been found, police said as they announced an arrest in connection with the case.

Amber Redman, 19, of Standing Buffalo First Nation, was last seen in the early morning hours of July 15, 2005, outside a bar in Fort Qu'Appelle, a town about 70 kilometres northeast of Regina.

A 29-year-old man from Little Black Bear First Nation has been arrested, police said late Monday. No charges have been laid.

A wooded area within the reserve, where the remains were found, has been cordoned off as police search the area.

"We're searching a fairly contained and specific location," said RCMP Sgt. Brian Jones.

Investigators were also searching a home on the reserve.

The search will continue on Tuesday. Police would not say whether the remains had been removed from the site.

"There?s still work to be done," said Jones.

When Redman went missing in 2005, police, volunteers and members of her community scoured the area where she was last seen but failed to find any clues to her whereabouts.

Little Black Bear First Nation is located near Goodeve, about 85 kilometres from Fort Qu'Appelle.

Chris

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Albert Bellegarde

What a winner! Glad he is going to sent away for 25 years. I think the other was just an accomlis after the fact.


Adrian

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Albert Bellegarde,29, and Gilbert Bellegarde, 30., were charged with 1st degree murder, of Amber Redman.

On Little Black Bear reserve., Saskatchewan. >:( >:( >:(

"innocent until proven guilty"   ??? ??? ???

Chris

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If I am not mistaken, they are not from her reserve and they may have only crossed paths on the day she was murdered. Which makes me wonder what these fella's were up too?

Adrian

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Re: Amber Redman - July 15, 2005 - Age: 19 ? Missing - Fort Qu'Appelle
« Reply #5 on: January 23, 2009, 07:54:56 PM »

Amber Redmond's Mom: No more secrets.


By JENNIFER GRAHAM, The Canadian Press
   

REGINA ? A Saskatchewan mother who organized a massive search when her daughter first disappeared more than three years ago says other missing aboriginal women could be found if the First Nations community were to ?stop keeping secrets.?

?When sexual assault (happens), when a murder (happens), when there?s been a rape, any type of abuse, that needs to be spoken about. It needs to be told to the proper people,? Gwenda Yuzicappi told The Canadian Press on Friday.

?Don?t keep it a secret,? she pleaded.

Yuzicappi?s daughter, Amber Redman, disappeared in July 2005, but the 19-year-old woman?s remains weren?t found until last May after a police sting operation. A 29-year-old man pleaded guilty Thursday to second-degree murder and was sentenced to life in prison with no chance at parole for 15 years.

Yuzicappi, who told court her life was one of ?pain and emptiness? for the 34 months Redman?s whereabouts were unknown, said more missing aboriginal women could be found and more families could be helped if First Nations communities stepped up.

?How do you expect these people to heal, how do you expect these people who have done wrong to be responsible when they are keeping it a secret? I don?t understand that.?

Yuzicappi said she believes residents of the Little Black Bear reserve, where Redman?s battered skeletal remains were found in a bush, knew what had happened and kept silent.

?I believe that wholeheartedly. They knew and no one would come forward and talk,? she said. ?What are they scared of??

The grieving mother spoke out one day after she heard the gruesome details of her only daughter?s last moments.

Before he was sentenced, court heard a statement from Albert Bellegarde that he and another man, Gilbert Bellegarde ? no relation ? drove to Fort Qu?Appelle, Sask., to get beer and met Redman, who voluntarily got into their car. They then drove to Gilbert Bellegarde?s home on the reserve.

Court heard that Gilbert Bellegarde and the young woman went into a bedroom and things got rough. When Albert Bellegarde went to investigate, he found a badly beaten Redman.

Instead of helping her, court heard Albert Bellegarde also struck her. He dumped her over a balcony and then dragged the unconscious, but still alive, woman into the bush and ?finished her off? with a butcher?s knife to the head.

His version of events was captured on tape by undercover RCMP officers.

At one point on the tape, as Bellegarde was leading the police to Redman?s body, an officer asked him what it felt like to kill the girl. Bellegarde told them, ?To be honest with you, it was exhilarating.?

Defence lawyer Mervyn Shaw said the investigators were posing as criminals and his client was trying to impress them when he confessed.

Albert Bellegarde?s sentence was reasonable, Yuzicappi said Friday, but the family is still looking for answers.

Only one side of the story has been told, she suggested. The mother wants to hear from Gilbert Bellegarde, who was also arrested and charged with murder, but the charge was stayed late last year. Court heard he has maintained his silence about what happened that night.

?I don?t feel that it is concluded yet. I don?t feel that and I will continue to speak about it and I will continue to ask Gilbert Bellegarde: Where is your side of the story?? said Yuzicappi.

She also plans to continue advocating for hundreds of missing or murdered aboriginal women and girls across the country. Next Thursday, she plans to join a walk to raise awareness about the disappearance of Tara-Lyn Poorman, who was last seen leaving a home in Regina on Dec. 12.

?This is always going to be a priority in my life,? said Yuzicappi.

?I?ve gone through it and if I can help in any way for all the families that are going through this experience, this pain of not knowing where their family member is, then I will help them in any way.?

As of last November, the Native Women?s Association of Canada had a database with 510 cases of missing or murdered aboriginal women and girls dating back more than 30 years.

Of those cases, 127 have been identified as missing and 340 were murdered, according to the association. There are 43 cases where the nature of the case remains unconfirmed, or where a situation of ?wrongful death? has been identified.

Association president Beverly Jacobs wouldn?t comment directly on the suggestion that residents of the Little Black Bear reserve had kept silent in the Redman case.

But she acknowledged that more missing women could be found if people spoke out across the country.

?This is an issue within society about sexual violence, about violence in itself, that ... remains silent until somebody is willing to come forward and say that it has to stop,? said Jacobs.

?I think there are a lot of women out there, like Gwenda for one, who is saying that it has to stop.?

Jacobs has suffered her own loss. Her cousin, Tashina Cheyenne General, disappeared in January 2008 and was found dead in a shallow grave four months later on the Six Nations reserve south of Brantford, Ont.

Adrian

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Re: Amber Redman - July 15, 2005 - Age: 19 ? Missing - Fort Qu'Appelle
« Reply #6 on: January 28, 2009, 02:32:59 PM »


The missing and murdered was Canada's most well kept secret, for over 30 years. This is the tip of the iceburg. Now that the media, is finally picking up stories here and there, there is still not enuff being done.

We need pics of those missing, sooner, not later. I know the cops have a job to do, but by not putting these missing OUT there, is causing more harm I feel.No one should ever feel less than. We need more re enactments, for these cases of the HIgh Risk. Right now, high risk, is being female.

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Re: Amber Redman - July 15, 2005 - Age: 19 ? Missing - Fort Qu'Appelle
« Reply #7 on: February 03, 2009, 01:57:00 AM »
Hey that is a good article. Thanks for posting it. I am sure a lot of folks on reservations don't want to talk to police, maybe there are some who don't like them. But for the sake of the community and loved ones I hope they'll start to talk. I am sure lots of crimes would be solved fast.

BCID

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Re: Amber Redman - July 15, 2005 - Age: 19 ? Missing - Fort Qu'Appelle
« Reply #8 on: August 10, 2009, 10:49:30 AM »
http://www.cbc.ca/canada/saskatchewan/story/2008/05/07/gilbert-bellegarde.html

2 men accused of killing teen appear in court
Last Updated: Wednesday, May 7, 2008 | 4:44 PM CT

Family and supporters of both the accused and Amber Redman filled a Regina courtroom Wednesday as two men charged with killing the young woman appeared before a judge.

Albert Patrick Bellegarde, 29, and Gilbert Allan Bellegarde, 31, both originally from the Little Black Bear First Nation near Fort Qu'Appelle, Sask., are charged with first-degree murder and have been remanded in custody.

Police have refused to say how or if the two men are related.

They were arrested after what police believe are the remains of Amber Redman, who disappeared in 2005, were discovered on Little Black Bear. DNA testing is being done.

RCMP don't think there was a connection between the two men and Redman prior to her disappearance.

Redman, 19, of the Standing Buffalo First Nation, was last seen outside a Fort Qu'Appelle bar on July 15, 2005. The original search failed to yield any clues to her whereabouts, but her family kept the case in the public eye. Saskatchewan police said she was one of 30 missing women in Saskatchewan, 18 of them aboriginal.

Albert Bellegarde will be back in court in Fort Qu'Appelle on Monday, while Gilbert Bellegarde appear in a Regina court on May 23.

Redman's mother, Gwenda Yuzicappi, waited until other people left the courtroom before walking out. She was visibly emotional and wearing a T-shirt with her daughter's picture on it.

Redman's uncle Rick Whitecloud said the court appearance is the first step in the quest for justice. It's not going to be an easy process for Yuzicappi, he said.

"I know too much already as for what she went through and how she suffered and I don't want to hear anything from anyone in that regards," he said.

Whitecloud said his family does not know the accused.

Fort Qu'Appelle, Standing Buffalo First Nation and Little Black Bear First Nation are all northeast of Regina.



http://www.cbc.ca/canada/saskatchewan/story/2009/01/22/bellegarde-redman.html

Man pleads guilty in Amber Redman murder case
Family of slain teen weeps as details of case revealed
Last Updated: Thursday, January 22, 2009 | 11:15 AM CT
CBC News

A Saskatchewan man who pleaded guilty to second-degree murder in the death of a 19-year-old woman has been sentenced to life in prison with no eligibility for parole for 15 years.

Queen's Bench Justice Frank Gerein sentenced Albert Patrick Bellegarde Thursday for the brutal slaying of Amber Redman in 2005.

Redman's remains were found last May on the Little Black Bear First Nation near Fort Qu'Appelle.

She disappeared in July 2005 after being last seen in a bar in Fort Qu'Appelle.

Bellegarde was arrested shortly after Redman's remains were discovered. He was 29.

For the first time, details about how Redman died were made public.

In a statement of facts agreed to by the Crown and defence, court heard Bellegarde and his cousin, Gilbert Allan Bellegarde, met Redman at the bar the night she disappeared.

They convinced her to go to their house with them. Later, Albert Bellegarde heard screams. He found Gilbert Bellegarde beating Redman. He joined the assault, saying that his cousin was like a brother and he was trying to protect him.

They beat her until she was unconscious. Albert Bellegarde then threw her off a balcony. He wrapped her in blankets and hid the still-living Redman in the bush.

Albert Bellegarde then took out a large knife, stabbed Redman in the head, and left her to die.

Gilbert Bellegarde was originally charged with first-degree murder, but the Crown later stayed the charge,

Members of Redman's family wept during the proceedings. Several victim impact statements were read that described Redman as a warm, kind, generous and loving person. In her statement, Redman's mother, Gwen Yuzicappi, wrote of the pain she felt in losing her only daughter.

One relative demanded that Bellegarde look at her while she read her statement. He did not, however.

When Gerein asked Bellegarde what he had to say, he said he was sorry for what he did.

A life sentence is mandatory for a second-degree murder conviction, and at least 10 years must be served to qualify for parole.

The Crown and defence submitted a joint request for a 15-year parole eligibility period.

The high-profile case helped bring public attention to the plight of missing aboriginal women. The RCMP had been investigating Redman's disappearance for more than two years without a breakthrough until they were able to trick Albert Bellegarde into revealing where the body was located.

Court heard undercover police officers convinced Bellegarde he could join a gang, but he would have to provide information about the things he had done before that could happen. While the event was being secretly recorded, Bellegarde led undercover police to the site

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Re: Amber Redman - July 15, 2005 - Age: 19 ? Missing - Fort Qu'Appelle
« Reply #9 on: August 18, 2009, 02:22:02 AM »
Wow! 15 years! Not bad. I felt this would be a short sentence. I would prefer 20-25 though.