Author Topic: 1950 - 1969 Unsolved Murders and Missing - Canada  (Read 85626 times)

Fraser

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Re: 1950 - 1969 Unsolved Murders and Missing - Canada
« Reply #30 on: October 30, 2009, 08:39:45 PM »
Carolyn Yuen Lee - Solved 21 years later
from web site: http://www.nvr.org/research_content.php?pro=research&sec=film&subsec=4

"Forensics
The Gene Squad
Directed and Written by Jerry Thompson
Produced by Terence McKeown and Bette Thompson
Canadian Broadcasting Company, 1999
Distributed by Filmmakers Library Inc.
43 minutes

In the spring of 1977, 12-year-old Carolyn Lee disappeared on a short walk from dance class to her parents' diner in Port Alberni, British Columbia. Though her body was found the next day and a suspect identified within a few weeks, the case took 21 years to come to trial. In those two decades, no new evidence was discovered but there was new technology - DNA profile matching.

The Gene Squad traces the development of forensic DNA sampling and profiling starting with its first use in Birmingham, England in 1986. In this case, an innocent man confessed and would have been charged but for dramatic, though rather rudimentary DNA analysis and a mass screening known as "The Blooding," in which all men in the area gave blood and saliva samples. With the samples and old-fashioned police work, a serial killer was caught.

Eleven years later Royal Mounted Police detective Dan Smith read a magazine article about DNA as he sat in his dentist's waiting room. By then the Ottawa National Police Laboratory had begun DNA testing. Smith sent old vaginal swabs and soil samples from the Carolyn Lee case, along with blood from the suspect to the lab. But the crime samples had begun to decay and the analysis was inconclusive. Four years later more sophisticated profiling and electron microscope scanning produced a match. But would DNA evidence be admitted in a trial? Had the suspect been fully aware of what was at risk when he gave a blood sample? Was the "blooding" voluntary and informed? Detectives waited. In 1990 Canadian Parliament passed a law allowing police to serve warrants for DNA samples. Again they tested the subject, this time with legal backing, and this time went to trial. Carolyn Lee's murderer, who thought he would never be charged with the crime, was convicted and sentenced to life in prison. It took 21 years, but, as one detective noted "the new science did it all."

Fraser

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Re: 1950 - 1969 Unsolved Murders and Missing - Canada
« Reply #31 on: March 24, 2010, 07:38:08 PM »
Okay, I am going to try to get back on some of these. I'll let you know what I come up with. I have been busy moving etc. Ironically, I moved to Orillia and the first weekend I was up here I was visiting friends and they brought up the Leah Sousa case...they live only a couple of km from where she lived.

Fraser

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Re: 1950 - 1969 Unsolved Murders and Missing - Canada
« Reply #32 on: March 24, 2010, 08:02:53 PM »
Started working on them again but realized I need the notebook I was keeping at home as I feel like I may have already done a couple of the ones I am now working on. One thing that is confuddling me (absolutely NO criticism intended here), is that some of the ones from the 70's are listed in the 1960-69 category. I look at the 70's category and even without these ones it is massive. So, I am going to keep on these ones...should I perhaps give them a new thread or something?
Thanks

Fraser

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Re: 1950 - 1969 Unsolved Murders and Missing - Canada
« Reply #33 on: April 11, 2010, 06:18:24 PM »
Furry Creek, BC Okay, I am going to post some more of my findings, unfortunately, not much to find. I will post the info over a few posts. This first lot is not in the date sequence as originally listed. I may have found a common thread in these ones. Although they are listed as Squamish/Vancouver cases, when I looked at the death registration information on Ancestry.ca I found all of their locations of death were within 18km of a place called Furry Creek, BC. I have included one that was listed as Squamish as it seems to be in the same area. I am not sure if these young ladies actually died/were found near Furry Creek or if they were perhaps, from there, and therefore, their deaths were listed for that location. I have to break this one into two posts as the computer is fussing

1. 12 April 73 Helen Hopcroft, age 17, Vancouver
        Her death was registered as 13 May 73, Furry Creek, BC
        There was an obituary for her in the Winnipeg Free Press 7 June 73

2. 17 Feb 75 Gayle Rogers, Vancouver, BC
        If it is the same young lady, found "Gail Sandra Rogers" Date of registered death, 7 Mar 75, she was born in 1949 so she was 26,
        her death is registered as "Squamish, BC"

3.
       



feenix

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Re: 1950 - 1969 Unsolved Murders and Missing - Canada
« Reply #34 on: May 03, 2010, 01:24:52 PM »
katherine Pozzobon murder is solved

Fraser

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Re: 1950 - 1969 Unsolved Murders and Missing - Canada
« Reply #35 on: May 04, 2010, 02:16:33 PM »
It looks like it is Pozzobon, see Feenix posting. And, with that spelling, Catherine Emma Pozzobon, death registered Oct 15, 1978, Maple Ridge BC.
« Last Edit: May 04, 2010, 02:22:55 PM by Fraser »

gumshoe

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Re: 1950 - 1969 Unsolved Murders and Missing - Canada
« Reply #36 on: May 24, 2010, 02:13:02 PM »
Could anyone tell me the total number of homicides committed in Toronto during 1969?
Thank you.
-- Shamus.

Chris

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Re: 1950 - 1969 Unsolved Murders and Missing - Canada
« Reply #37 on: May 26, 2010, 01:32:48 PM »
sorry, no idea. Contact the police service for that.

gunit

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Re: 1950 - 1969 Unsolved Murders and Missing - Canada
« Reply #38 on: August 04, 2011, 08:42:30 AM »
Good day everyone,

This is my first post on here, after spending countless hours pouring over the information on this web site.

I noticed that there has been extensive discussion regarding the link of Rail Road tracks to a number of homicides.  Here is my input:

1.  People, despite their differences and uniqueness have common traits, thoughts and actions.  Of these commonalities, most people have the desire to not be disturbed doing something they enjoy, don't want to get caught doing something wrong, or something they know that other people will adamantly object to, and finally are generally lazy (not necessarily in a bad way). 

2.  So, when it comes to the rail road connection, we must look at these connections objectively.  Undoubtedly, when it comes to the old investigation adage that 'There is no such thing as coincidence' there is much truth to this, however, we must not loose sight of objectivity. 

3.  That being said, perhaps there is a possibility that the reason for the use of rail roads is very simple.  Rail roads often provide quick and easy access to remote or concealed areas, such as forests where one may secret away a crime or evidence thereof (ie a murder victim).  Someone touch briefly on this view, by attributing the possibility of loud noise to conceal the crime itself.

4.  I think the thing is to view everything known as a chain, and factors of the crime as links in the chain.  For instance, how the crime was committed, victim characteristics and location.  Location on it's own should be viewed as a link in a large chain as opposed to a large link in a small chain.

Great observations though, I think this website and it's membership are doing great work and I don't want my opinion to seem that I am trying to detract from that, simply trying to play a devil's advocate of sorts to develop a wider spectrum of view.

Mom

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Re: 1950 - 1969 Unsolved Murders and Missing - Canada
« Reply #39 on: August 04, 2011, 09:09:31 AM »

The connection to the railway tracks could also be the possibility that the perpetrator is a hobo.

jellybean

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Re: 1950 - 1969 Unsolved Murders and Missing - Canada
« Reply #40 on: August 12, 2011, 06:54:50 PM »

The connection to the railway tracks could also be the possibility that the perpetrator is a hobo.

Hobos? YES! Also,during that time period there was such a thing as passenger trains. (now they are far and few inbetween). So let us not discount railway workers. Or for that matter a passenger with the desire to kill, and would stay in town a few days and hop the train for the next stop, or wherever he chose to kill again.
A serial killer on the CN or CP passenger list. Food for thought.

JB
« Last Edit: August 12, 2011, 06:58:21 PM by jellybean »

jellybean

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Re: 1950 - 1969 Unsolved Murders and Missing - Canada
« Reply #41 on: August 12, 2011, 07:46:31 PM »
Gunit; Welcome to this site. We welcome a broader spectrum in views. Hope you can contribute some of your thoughts and theories on our various threads.
I will look forward to  reading them.

JB

Whistle

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Re: 1950 - 1969 Unsolved Murders and Missing - Canada
« Reply #42 on: August 17, 2011, 10:02:51 PM »
 This caught my eye.

Quote
Lois McLaughlin - July 9, 1957 - Age 22 - Murdered - Chesterville, ON - Lois' husband came home with the children after a day away from this remote farm and found his wife on the ground in front of their home. She had been brutally murdered with items found in a shed on the farm, a scythe, a hammer etc. This farm is so remote that the police figure the killer got in on foot because there is only one road leading in and out and no one saw a vehicle coming up the road all day. Chesterville is about 20km east of Cornwall. There is possibly a Naval history in Cornwall during this year but it is known that the Coast Guard had a radar training facility there until it was moved to Cornwallis, NS - across the water..................

.............Lynne Harper - June 9, 1959 - Age 12 - Murdered - Clinton, ON - Lynne was abducted from the road and sexually assaulted in a wooded grove. She had been strangled with her own blouse. Steven Truscotte was recently acquitted of this murder so her murder is now unsolved. Alexander Kalichuk was an air-force member in Aylmer, ON at the time of Lynne's murder but he worked with Lynne's father in Clinton in the few years prior to her murder and often visited Clinton from Aylmer (which is southeast of London, ON). It is unknown if Kalichuk, who died in 1975, was ever suspected in her murder.


 I believe that RCAF Clinton was also a radar training facility. Would there have been any common personel who may have worked at both  Cornwall and Clinton?

W.

mason82

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Re: 1950 - 1969 Unsolved Murders and Missing - Canada
« Reply #43 on: January 03, 2013, 10:56:08 PM »

I went to school with Nancy Johnsen at William Watson and lived not to far from her. We were friends her and her sister Marry. This death has disturbed me for many years and the lack of information. My family was part of the search party, and I remember it very well.
________________________________________________________________________________________

A bit more info on Nancy Johnsen



goNgo

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Re: 1950 - 1969 Unsolved Murders and Missing - Canada
« Reply #44 on: January 09, 2013, 05:44:16 PM »
Welcome Mason.

That must have been very unsettling to have your acquaintance disappear like that!  Was there any sense in the community of what might have happened at the time?