Author Topic: Dwayne Michael Lewis | Dangerous Offender | Violent Serial Rapist  (Read 4539 times)

Concerned

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RELEASED Tuesday, February 6, 2007

In the interest of community safety, Chief Bill Closs of the Kingston Police, under the authority of the Police Services Act of Ontario, discloses the following information regarding Dwayne Michael LEWIS, 27 yrs. 

Lewis has numerous convictions which include four offences of sexual assault, some with violence.  All of the sexual assaults were on females, and they were all predatory in nature. The victims ranged in age from 15 years of age to 64 years of age.

Lewis is being released on warrant expiry after serving his sentence in its entirety.

Lewis will be released on a Recognizance to Keep the Peace.

This release has numerous stipulations to help monitor Lewis?s activities. These conditions include curfew, restriction of mobility, and reporting to police agencies.

Lewis is described as non- white, 5? 11?, 180 lb, with brown eyes, black hair, and a beard.

The Kingston Police will be monitoring the conditions of his release to ensure public safety.

Concerned

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Re: Dwayne Michael Lewis | Dangerous Offender | Violent Serial Rapist
« Reply #1 on: October 16, 2010, 06:39:51 AM »
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Violent serial rapist slapped with dangerous offender status

COURT: Man who viciously assaulted Kingston woman in 2007 now can only be freed at the discretion of the National Parole Board

By SUE YANAGISAWA, THE WHIG-STANDARD

Posted 5 months ago

A serial rapist who stalked women in the parks of Vaughn in north metropolitan Toronto during his teens; spent his twenties in federal prison and viciously assaulted a Kingston woman 62 days after he was released here in 2007 has been designated a dangerous offender.


Dwayne Michael Lewis, 30, pleaded guilty last September in Kingston's Superior Court of Justice to five crimes arising out of the Kingston attack: aggravated sexual assault, choking to overcome resistance to the crime, carrying a knife for the purpose of committing a sexual assault, unlawful confinement and violating the public safety peace bond he entered with Kingston Police when he disclosed his intention to live here.

Instead of proceeding to an ordinary sentencing after his pleas were in, assistant Crown attorney Ross Drummond applied to have Lewis' trial judge, Justice Helen MacLeod-Beliveau, sentence him to an indeterminate prison term -- essentially a life sentence -- by designating him a dangerous offender.

The designation doesn't mean Lewis can never get out of prison. He'll be eligible to ask for parole seven years from the date of his arrest, in April 2014, but the only way he can be released now is through a decision of the National Parole Board -- and its members would have to be satisfied that the risk Lewis represents could be managed in the community. A dangerous offender designation is also permanent: If he is eventually released, he'll be subject to parole conditions for the rest of his life.

The hearing began in January. Among those who testified were three forensic psychiatrists who used different terminology in diagnosing him but Justice MacLeod-Beliveau said in her decision she was satisfied they were all describing essentially the same "serious sexual deviation," which she characterized as "a preference for sex with non-consenting adult females," sometimes referred to as a rape preference.

Interestingly, the psychiatric experts all agreed that Lewis is not a psychopath, although the judge observed he demonstrated "substantial indifference toward his victims," and the harm he was causing them during the commission of his crimes.

The experts disagreed as to whether Lewis meets criteria to be defined as a sadist but Drummond, on behalf of the Crown, argued that by ordinary layman standards his crimes exhibit sadistic features.

Defence lawyer Fergus O'Connor held that Lewis could be controlled in the community within the foreseeable future. He said there is data to support the probability that his client's sex drive will diminish over time, rendering him less dangerous.

Had the judge decided that Lewis' risk might be manageable in a decade or so, it was within the her discretion to designate him a long-term offender and impose a traditional determinate sentence, followed by a long-term supervision order for up to 10 years

She found, however, "there is no evidence that Mr. Lewis is treatable within a definite period of time."

"The evidence is nothing more than mere hope that he can be treated at all."
During his hearing, the judge was told that Lewis participated in a high intensity treatment program for sexual offenders while in prison, a program she described as "very sophisticated." Plus, he was placed in two maintenance programs at Warkworth Institution after the parole board turned him down for early release. His intelligence is ranked above average and MacLeod-Beliveau heard that he appeared motivated and insightful to those in charge of his treatment.

Yet, given his freedom and placed in a position to apply his insights, the judge found that Lewis failed to resort to any of the prevention or relapse techniques he'd learned.

It came out during the hearing that Lewis had in fact started frequenting local prostitutes soon after his release and by his own estimate hired their services approximately a dozen times before he sought out his Kingston victim.

MacLeod-Beliveau was told that he was matched in the community with a Circle of Support and Accountability through the Salvation Army. The judge found that resource was squandered, however, when "he was not forthcoming and, in fact, was deceitful ... as to his actual sexual activities and deviant thoughts."

The judge noted that the day immediately before he attacked his Kingston victim, Lewis attended a meeting of his support circle and gave them no inkling he was "re-entering his offence cycle," unhappy with his job as a dishwasher or having sexual fan-t asies about a 27-year-old masseuse.

Likewise, the very day of the crime, April 11, 2007, Lewis reported as required to Kingston Police Det. Const. Gerry Doherty and told him everything was going well. It's Doherty who's responsible to keep tabs on all of the high-risk releases from surrounding penitentiaries who either choose to live in Kingston or are required to stay here.

Lewis left his police interview and some time within the three hours that followed he turned up at the victim's home, already equipped with a knife because he wanted to have sex with her and he equates one with the other.

During the attack that fol-lowed Lewis choked the woman unconscious -- twice -- and raped her on her massage table, then forced her to shower while he watched. One of her toenails was ripped off during her struggle to fend him off, but she still she attempted to escape.

He caught her, however, and found bleach and alcohol in her apartment, which he used to clean the massage table and des t roy any DNA evidence he might have left behind. Finally, he piled the table's cotton cover in the middle of the woman's carpet and set it alight. The flames melted part of her carpet.

It was in keeping with the pattern he'd already set at least a dozen years earlier.

Lewis began his predations early. An assessment conducted at the Regional Treatment Centre when he was 24 suggests that his first sexual assault may have been committed when he was only 14. He was accused of hitting an upstairs neighbour in the head with a hammer after she found him standing in her bedroom.

The assault charge was later dismissed but when questioned about the incident by a psychiatrist in prison, Lewis didn't deny it happened, only that there was a sexual motivation.

By the time he was 17, howeve

r, Lewis was terrorizing the Vaughn area were he lived, stalking and attacking women, most of them as they walked home at night from the subway or bus along the periphery or through parks in the area around Dufferin Street and Steeles Avenue.

Lewis carried a rape-kit, covered his face with a bandana, and preferred to grab his victims from behind. He threatened them with knives and wasn't averse to getting rough if they resisted. Five women, ranging in age from 21 to 64 -- all petite -- were attacked between Nov. 10 and Dec. 9, 1996, when Lewis was 17 years old

He was finally arrested in May 1997, however, after arranging to have a 36-year-old escort come to his home. There, after settling on a price of $120 for half an hour, Lewis left the room, ostensibly to get the cash. But he returned with a large kitchen knife instead, announcing: "I guess this will be free."

The woman tried to convince him to put down the knife, but he grabbed her from behind and choked her nearly unconscious.

Her purse got upended in the scuffle and Lewis became apologetic when she managed to grab her cellphone from the jumble and pushed the speed dial to summon back-up.

The woman managed to grab the knife he'd momentarily put down while helping to pick up her spilled possessions and she held the blade toward him as she backed out toward the front door. But he ving toward her and after she got the door open he tried to push it closed to keep her there, even as her "protector" pulled her through the opening.

The prostitute and her companion called police and Lewis, who was then 18, fled to a friend's house. He was later arrested and when he was searched he was found to be carrying a set of handcuffs and a bungee cord. Investigators later recovered the knife and the escort's broken fingernail from his home.

He'd left saliva on one of his earlier victims, which yielded a DNA sample that finally tied him to the series of attacks in the parks, and he was charged as a youth.

Lewis was tried in adult court for his crimes, and even though charges relating to two of his victims were stayed, the particulars of their attacks were included in the agreed statement of facts presented to his original trial judge.

Lewis, who ended up pleading guilty to the remaining counts of sexual assault with a weapon, agreed to those details and was sentenced in 2001 to six years in penitentiary, plus credit for the 26 months he spent in pretrial custody, bringing his sentence to the equivalent of more than 10 years.

He served the entire sentence, the National Parole Board having decided that he was too dangerous to serve the final third of his sentence in the community under mandatory supervision.

Before MacLeod-Belieau told him he was being designated a dangerous offender she asked Lewis if there was anything he wanted to say.

"I'd like to apologize to the City of Kingston," he told her, "the person I violated, her family and friends."

suey@thewhig.com
http://www.thewhig.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=2562401

Carol-Lynn

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Re: Dwayne Michael Lewis | Dangerous Offender | Violent Serial Rapist
« Reply #2 on: October 16, 2010, 06:46:38 AM »
http://www.thewhig.com/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=2562401

COURT: Man who viciously assaulted Kingston woman in 2007 now can only be freed at the discretion of the National Parole Board
By SUE YANAGISAWA, THE WHIG-STANDARD
Posted 5 months ago
 

A serial rapist who stalked women in the parks of Vaughn in north metropolitan Toronto during his teens; spent his twenties in federal prison and viciously assaulted a Kingston woman 62 days after he was released here in 2007 has been designated a dangerous offender.


Dwayne Michael Lewis, 30, pleaded guilty last September in Kingston's Superior Court of Justice to five crimes arising out of the Kingston attack: aggravated sexual assault, choking to overcome resistance to the crime, carrying a knife for the purpose of committing a sexual assault, unlawful confinement and violating the public safety peace bond he entered with Kingston Police when he disclosed his intention to live here.

Instead of proceeding to an ordinary sentencing after his pleas were in, assistant Crown attorney Ross Drummond applied to have Lewis' trial judge, Justice Helen MacLeod-Beliveau, sentence him to an indeterminate prison term -- essentially a life sentence -- by designating him a dangerous offender.

The designation doesn't mean Lewis can never get out of prison. He'll be eligible to ask for parole seven years from the date of his arrest, in April 2014, but the only way he can be released now is through a decision of the National Parole Board -- and its members would have to be satisfied that the risk Lewis represents could be managed in the community. A dangerous offender designation is also permanent: If he is eventually released, he'll be subject to parole conditions for the rest of his life.

The hearing began in January. Among those who testified were three forensic psychiatrists who used different terminology in diagnosing him but Justice MacLeod-Beliveau said in her decision she was satisfied they were all describing essentially the same "serious sexual deviation," which she characterized as "a preference for sex with non-consenting adult females," sometimes referred to as a rape preference.

Interestingly, the psychiatric experts all agreed that Lewis is not a psychopath, although the judge observed he demonstrated "substantial indifference toward his victims," and the harm he was causing them during the commission of his crimes.

The experts disagreed as to whether Lewis meets criteria to be defined as a sadist but Drummond, on behalf of the Crown, argued that by ordinary layman standards his crimes exhibit sadistic features.

Defence lawyer Fergus O'Connor held that Lewis could be controlled in the community within the foreseeable future. He said there is data to support the probability that his client's sex drive will diminish over time, rendering him less dangerous.

Had the judge decided that Lewis' risk might be manageable in a decade or so, it was within the her discretion to designate him a long-term offender and impose a traditional determinate sentence, followed by a long-term supervision order for up to 10 years

She found, however, "there is no evidence that Mr. Lewis is treatable within a definite period of time."

"The evidence is nothing more than mere hope that he can be treated at all."