Author Topic: Judge in Ontario strikes down prostitution laws!  (Read 9935 times)

amIam

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Re: Judge in Ontario strikes down prostitution laws!
« Reply #15 on: September 30, 2010, 04:42:06 PM »
Perhaps they will have to work harder for pay duty...?

Does this mean the police are going to stop dragging these woman into "the tank"?  Imagine the tons of time they will have to solve murders and robberies.
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Chris

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Re: Judge in Ontario strikes down prostitution laws!
« Reply #16 on: October 02, 2010, 04:04:31 PM »

jobo

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Re: Judge in Ontario strikes down prostitution laws!
« Reply #17 on: October 04, 2010, 06:31:31 AM »
I agree with you Carol-Lynn.....no one should have control over someone's body.......This should be interesting to see what changes actually happen.   
Prostitution is the "Oldest Profession"...It will never go away..too much need for it.  And the girls are safer in brothels, than they are on the street.
I only watched a bit of the show A Lady's Guide to a Brothel.......One thing one of the girls said was that there still was control over them...seemed to me that the brothels like to fine the girls for any little thing...anything to take their money...but on the other hand, they are safe, and still making a good buck.

Edsonmom

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Re: Judge in Ontario strikes down prostitution laws!
« Reply #18 on: November 03, 2010, 12:54:14 PM »
This is a very long read, but is a great study of the missing persons in BC. It is run over a 50 year span, from 1950-2004. This Thesis was written in 2005..Very well done..

http://ir.lib.sfu.ca/retrieve/2138/etd1771.pdf

Woodland

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Re: Judge in Ontario strikes down prostitution laws!
« Reply #19 on: November 03, 2010, 03:34:39 PM »
This is very informative.  Amazing that BC has always been the number 1 province to disappear from.

This report left me with the impression that police across the country and at all levels have withheld alot of info on our missing.  Not only withheld it, but seem to have been trained all these years to ignore the issue.  Police reporting is lax and erronous on a routine basis.

So much could have been developed in the meantime - a national registry available to the public would have been a good start as voiced by Concerned previously.

Why not turn the few tools the police have over to the public to use?

Concerned

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Re: Judge in Ontario strikes down prostitution laws!
« Reply #20 on: November 03, 2010, 06:39:10 PM »
Fantastic. Extremely well done. Thank you so much for sharing.

Lots of very valuable info.  One stat really stands out and underscores the need to take this information seriously and to do something about it:  Australia reports that in their country at least 12 individuals are affected by every missing person case. In one year in Australia, this amounts to 360,000 affected individual per year. They go on to say that:

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With the large numbers of people affected by missing persons cases, there is a huge impact on a community. Health problems such as stress related disorders, depression and in extreme cases, suicide, are major issues. Thirty-seven percent of respondents in the study reported having severe medical problems related to the disappearance of their loved one. Eighty-three percent reported having to take time off work and 43 percent said that their business suffered as a result of the missing persons case. Personal relationships may also be negatively affected when a loved one goes missing. Seventy-six percent of people stated that a relationship had changed in some way and the effect was ongoing.

The economic impacts of a missing persons case can vary. Personal costs for searching for an individual in this study were reported as ranging from $0 to over $7,000. Legal fees for settling an estate of a missing person can cost up to $2,000; these expenditures can be devastating for lower income families (Henderson & Henderson, 1998). The policing costs of missing persons cases are far more substantial than personal expenditures. The estimated cost of locating missing people is $2,360 per person that is reported to police. Using the 1997 data, that is a cost of over 72 million dollars per year without including the additional costs of aiding the family and friends of the missing person (Henderson & Henderson, 1998).

http://ir.lib.sfu.ca/retrieve/2138/etd1771.pdf

The report states the following Canadian statistics:

As of July 12, 2005, there are 7,034 missing persons that couldn't be found.  If we times that by 12 affected people per missing person (using the Australian estimate), that means 84,408 people are affected by those missing that couldn't be found.

Asking for assistance for 84,408 Canadians in need, to improve the system is not at all unreasonable. Secondly, if you ask those 84,408 individuals to volunteer to help make the system stellar in reporting, analyzing, locating, and preventing, they would probably undoubtedly do so on fumes.  Canada undoubtedly would be an even better place to live. Imagine what a difference that would make for all, in so many ways.

Also, based on the stats below, if Canada were to concentrate on three provinces first (BC 32%), (Ontario 21%), and (Quebec 18.5%) then 70% of the problem is being addressed. The rest of the areas could follow with the learnings of the other three.

BC 2,293
Alberta 658
Sask 131
Manitoba 258
Ontario 1,497
Quebec 1,303
N.B. 112
N.S. 310
P.E. 9
Newfoundland 281
Yukon 59
NW Territory 123

Total 7034

Using the Australian average of $2,400 cost per missing person, that would mean this could be a $16,881,600 cost to the country. Now, how much does it cost to implement some of these programs? What if those 84,408 volunteer to help to make this happen? 

Now, does it make sense not to implement change?  What are we waiting for?

Concerned

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Re: Judge in Ontario strikes down prostitution laws!
« Reply #21 on: November 03, 2010, 07:37:47 PM »
Here is another source of interesting information on the likely "unknown" missing that comes from the BC Human Rights Coalition and the United Nations Association in Canada.  Very interesting info that Benjamin Perrin (who by the way, is an absolute gem when it comes to trying to understand missing people, and who is exceptional advocate for a national registry) presents, delicately.

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=4058042792459522907#

If you Google his name, you will see that he is very active in missing persons and has done much in his fairly young age.

He has done much to further a national missing person registry and a tremendous advocate for those that go missing. One his latest blogs in "Canada's Journal of Ideas":

http://www.c2cjournal.ca/blog-articles/view/the-slave-trade-is-back-confronting-human-trafficking-in-canada-and-beyond/

http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/entertainment/books/bc-prof-shines-light-on-modern-day-slavery-104625099.html

More about him- bio:

http://www.law.ubc.ca/faculty/Perrin/web/biography.html

Excellent resource.

Edsonmom

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Re: Judge in Ontario strikes down prostitution laws!
« Reply #22 on: November 04, 2010, 09:21:46 AM »
 HA HA HA, I thought my post on the study got deleted.. Glad I found it again..I was not sure where to put it, in the first place, so I am glad it has found a home  ;)

Concerned

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Courtney Hue Salmon "Orian" | 35 | Brampton | Arrested Human Trafficking
« Reply #23 on: December 19, 2010, 07:52:05 AM »
How come after the initial arrest we don't hear anything more on these cases?

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Peel Police - Human Trafficking Arrestas then lured into the adult entertainment and the sex trade industries.
 
Investigators have concerns that Courtney Hue SALMON has recruited, or has attempted to recruit, other young women for similar purposes. Anyone who has been approached by this suspect is urged to contact investigators.
 
Anyone with information pertaining to this suspect, or to Human Trafficking issues in general, is urged to contact the Vice Unit at (905) 453-2121, ext. 3515. Information may also be left anonymously by calling Peel Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS (8477), by visiting www.peelcrimestoppers.ca

http://www.peelpolice.on.ca/News/Media%20Archive.aspx?Page=14&MainContent=2946

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June 24, 2010
Man faces trafficking charges again
By JONATHAN JENKINS, QMI Agency
   
TORONTO - Barely four months after having human-trafficking charges stayed, a Brampton man has been arrested for allegedly luring a high school student into stripping and prostitution.

"It's quite alarming that we've got now two victims that are alleging the same things against the same person," Peel police Const. J.P. Valade said, adding that the accused is innocent until proven guilty.

In the most recent case, the victim is a high school student. Describing her as "just your average, school-aged girl," Valade said she was steered into stripping and then prostitution.

"It was a systematic move toward total control of everything that she was doing."

The same man was charged with similar offences in 2009, but the complainant in that case decided not to testify and the charges were stayed in March.

Investigators suspect there are other young women with similar stories but do not want to release the man's picture for fear of identifying the complainant in the case.  (!??!!?)

"The victim and the suspect have been seen together a number of times," Valade said. "By issuing his photograph, we're concerned that several of her friends or people that she has regular contact with would be able to identify her."

Courtney Hue Salmon, 35, also known as Orian, was arrested Monday.

He's charged with human-trafficking, uttering threats, assault and breaching probation.

Anyone with information should call investigators at 905-453-2121, ext. 3515.

http://cnews.canoe.ca/CNEWS/Crime/2010/06/24/pf-14496961.html
« Last Edit: December 19, 2010, 07:54:16 AM by Concerned »

Woodland

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Re: Judge in Ontario strikes down prostitution laws!
« Reply #24 on: January 05, 2011, 09:36:15 AM »
What a tremendous step for LE to recognize the level of damage to the victims and to be proactive in their recovery.  I admire the effort on their part.