Author Topic: Amber Alyssa TUCCARO - 20 - Missing - August 18, 2010 - Edmonton, AB  (Read 54487 times)

CCF

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Re: Amber Alyssa TUCCARO - 20 - Missing - August 18, 2010 - Edmonton, AB
« Reply #105 on: March 30, 2016, 12:33:49 AM »
Some very interesting similarities in the charges laid against Gordon Alfred Rogers of Red Deer in the homicides of two aboriginal women in Lloydminster (one in 2007, the other in 2009).  The accused knew the one victim but did not know the other.

In the linked Saskatoon Star Phoenix article, both victims disappeared from outside of the same Lloydminster hotel but one was spotted getting into a green pick up with Sask. plates on it (the second article states the accused's name).  He either had a work truck which belonged to his employer (likely oil and gas out there) or it was his and he lived in Saskatchewan prior to living in Red Deer.  He put the first victim in a river or creek near Lloyd, which was discovered four days after she went missing and the second was dumped in a rural area and wasn't discovered for five months.  So far he partially fits the profile...drives a pickup and isn't afraid of rural areas plus all three (I'm including Amber) victims are aboriginal.

http://thestarphoenix.com/news/crime/man-faces-two-counts-of-first-degree-murder-in-historical-deaths-near-lloydminster

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton/red-deer-man-charged-in-murders-of-two-onion-lake-women-1.3505887

Seeing how Amber was picked up just outside her hotel in Nisku, the similarities are there between her case and these two aboriginal women's.  I wonder if they're looking at this guy as a POI in her case or if it's merely coincidence.  I'd love to hear his voice though-see if it is similar to the one in the recording.

jobo

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Re: Amber Alyssa TUCCARO - 20 - Missing - August 18, 2010 - Edmonton, AB
« Reply #106 on: March 30, 2016, 06:57:38 AM »
I also wondered if the police are checking him out regarding Amber's murder.  There is similarities.
I hope they have his DNA to compare with the unsolved murders of so many women out west.

jellybean

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Re: Amber Alyssa TUCCARO - 20 - Missing - August 18, 2010 - Edmonton, AB
« Reply #107 on: September 22, 2016, 11:34:43 AM »
I hadn't reviewed the Edmonton cases in sometime and this case was at the top so I thought I'd read it.  It immediately intrigued me and caught my attention, more so after I heard the audio tape of her killer's voice.  The first time I listened to his voice, I thought "He's from Saskatchewan".  My take is I think the guy either grew up there and now resides in the Leduc/Nisku/Beaumont area or still lives there but travels to Nisku from his home to fly to his job from the airport.  It's not so much an accent per se that has me thinking this, but more about the way words are pronounced or annunciated.  At one point Amber is talking and you can hear him talking at the same time say "This is horse shit" in frustration (in the metronews.ca clip, it is at 1:54-55).  This is my own opinion and maybe it's just me, but as I grew up in Sask, most people from there seem to use the slang of "horse shit" more frequently, as opposed to Albertans mainly saying "bull shit" when in disbelief or getting pissed off about a situation.  I could be completely off base, but it's something I've noticed anyways.

I'm no speech expert, but here's what I noticed about his speech pattern.  It's almost like an M.O. in the way he talks:
-He heavily annunciates the "Ah" in "absolutely" and draws it out.
-He doesn't pronounce the "ing" when he says words that end in 'ing' throughout the entire audio tape, which means he likely doesn't do it in everyday speech/conversations.  For example, when he says 'heading', he pronounces it as "headin".  When he says 'kidding' he pronounces it as "kiddin". When he says 'going', he pronounces it as "goin".
-The way he pronounces "gravel" is very distinct too, it's more like "gra-vl" and he again over annunciates the "ah" in "gravel" and pronounces the "vel" part very quickly and abruptly-again it's kind of a Saskatchewan way of pronouncing it, in my opinion.
-I'd say just by the sound of his voice, he's in his early to mid 40's.

He could be frequenting the Nisku area if he flies in and out of the airport on a 2/2 or 3/1 work rotation wherever he works at-Fort Mac, NWT, Northern B.C.-anywhere north really.  This could be why there is such little information about the vehicle she got into, he could have picked her up on his way in to Nisku to fly out the next day to his job or he was on his way home to Saskatchewan and their paths just happened to cross.

Just bringing this case up again.  Question:  I assume then, that he drives his own vehicle to Nisku and leaves it there while he flies out to work in the camps?
I read CCF's post, and he points out a number of interesting things, that could point towards the killer being raised in Sask.
I have always felt this guy was raised on a farm, and I think CCF has raised some valid points.
CCF may be onto something here. I cannot open the links on our site - but I have found a new one - msn. It does not have the full 17 minute voice recordings, but has some of it.

http://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/canada/amber-tuccaros-unsolved-murder-mysterious-voice-on-recording/ar-BBkQbbL
jb
« Last Edit: September 22, 2016, 02:03:31 PM by jellybean »

jellybean

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Re: Amber Alyssa TUCCARO - 20 - Missing - August 18, 2010 - Edmonton, AB
« Reply #108 on: September 22, 2016, 02:29:37 PM »
Here is a better recording (thank you Marnie) You will have to scroll down close to the bottom of the page.  It has Amada and her killer, then a redo of his voice only./jb

https://marnietunay2.wordpress.com/2015/02/17/amber-tuccaros-last-phone-call-the-complete-recording/

Sap1

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Very long article snipped (just most recent copied). Please see url for more.



https://globalnews.ca/news/3717306/amber-tuccaros-family-to-increase-reward-for-information-on-homicide/


It’s been seven years since Amber Alyssa Tuccaro disappeared from Nisku, Alta.


Now, her loved ones say they are planning to increase the $5,000 reward they’re offering for new information that could help solve her murder.


“(The reward has) been there before but now we’re going to up it, we just haven’t set the amount yet,” Paul Tuccaro, Amber Tuccaro’s brother, told reporters on Monday. “Because now, with this inquiry, it’s going to be getting more press and so now, hopefully, my sister’s name will be in the news again.”

Tuccaro said he can’t yet say by how much the reward will be increased but added it was coming out of the pockets of his family and the community.

He said he came to Edmonton from Fort Chipewyan this week to meet with officials with Canada’s inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls. The Edmonton hearings don’t take place until November but the inquiry is holding a community meeting in Alberta’s capital this week.

Paul Tuccaro, whose sister Amber Alyssa Tuccaro disappeared from Nisku, Alta. In 2010, said he came to Edmonton from Fort Chipewyan this week to meet with officials with Canada’s inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls.

Late Monday afternoon, Tuccaro’s brother held a news conference in Edmonton.

It’s been seven years since Amber Alyssa Tuccaro disappeared from Nisku, Alta. Now, her loved ones say they are planning to increase the $5,000 reward they’re offering for new information that could help solve her murder.

Last month, the family launched a social media campaign and started a Justice for Amber Facebook page to continue raising awareness about her case.




“You know, they hung on to the tape for as long as they did and not release it… Where’s their priorities?” Tuccaro asked. “If they would have had that tape, released it – or if the process.. that’s supposed to be followed was followed, not just pushed aside, maybe things would have been different.”

In March 2014, an RCMP spokesperson said she “recognizes initial elements of the investigation were mishandled.”

“The RCMP missing persons unit along with new policies and procedures were created because of the Amber Tuccaro file and other factors learned over the course of other investigations,” Sgt. Josee Valiquette said at the time.


Tuccaro said Canada’s inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women has been difficult for his family, particularly with the mounting number of people involved with the inquiry who have resigned.

“It’s been mentally draining because when you talk to the inquiry, you talk to (so) many different people,” he said, adding he has been told the inquiry may not include his sister’s death.

“We were told that because my sister’s case is ongoing that her story might not be included in the inquiry,” he said. “And we’re like, ‘Well, why not?’

“It upsets the whole family because you get all these women that are missing, and the majority of them, the cases are ongoing, but yet they’re included. But yet, (with) my sister, they said they had to check with their legal team to see if she could be included.”

This summer, the commission has heard from family members of missing and murdered women who say they have lost faith in the process, which is expected to take at least two years and cost $53.8 million.

In an open letter released earlier this month, some families called on the commission to start over from the beginning because of the resignation of one of the commissioners in July. The commissioners have said they are moving ahead with their work.

Tuccaro said his family is still hopeful the inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls will yield results but that he is also considering other steps if it doesn’t.

“(We’ll) see what happens with the inquiry and then… there’s been talk of our family with other families starting our own inquiry.

“The biggest thing is we owe it to my sister and to all the other women that went missing. They’re all First Nation and it seems like… everybody’s got families, all these women and girls they all have families… we’re not going to go anywhere. We owe it to my sister.”