Author Topic: Donald Mongeon | Murdered | Collins Bay Penitentiary (Jan 16, 1999)  (Read 7550 times)

Chris

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« Last Edit: October 24, 2009, 03:24:09 AM by Chris »

Chris

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Re: Donald Mongeon | Murdered | Collins Bay Penitentiary (Jan 15, 1999)
« Reply #1 on: August 19, 2009, 11:47:20 PM »

Chris

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Re: Donald Mongeon | Murdered | Collins Bay Penitentiary (Jan 15, 1999)
« Reply #2 on: August 19, 2009, 11:48:48 PM »
Has anyone else heard of this case? A suicide? this smellls really bad.

capeheart

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Re: Donald Mongeon | Murdered | Collins Bay Penitentiary (Jan 15, 1999)
« Reply #3 on: August 20, 2009, 07:39:29 PM »
That is a horrible story, I send my condolences to Donald's mother. I really find it so hard to believe that this kind of corruption goes on in prisons, but obviously it has. Was a story ever done on this case on the Fifth Estate or W5. Mrs. Mongeon should contact a journalist to do a story on this and bring it forward to the public. An inquiry should be done to find out who committed this crime and why it took two eight hour shifts before Donald's body was found. This does sure stink and sounds like a conspiracy of the guards and the prisoners in connection with Donald's death. Mrs. D. could also go with a civil action in this case and hire a lawyer and sue the prison for her son's death. If nobody comes forward with information, use the money and sue the prison. ??? ??? ??? ???

Chris

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Re: Donald Mongeon | Murdered | Collins Bay Penitentiary (Jan 15, 1999)
« Reply #4 on: October 19, 2009, 05:07:29 PM »
Profiler, new tests to probe Mongeon death
 
OPP may offer $50,000 reward for information
 
By Gary Dimmock, The Ottawa CitizenOctober 16, 2009 3:03 AM
 
 
Police detectives investigating the unsolved 1999 prison killing of Donald Mongeon are now sending 10-year-old blood samples collected from the crime scene for new DNA testing, and calling in a criminal profiler who will return to the cell where the Ottawa thief was stabbed to death some 50 steps from a three-man guard post.

The Citizen has also learned that Ontario Provincial Police are close to offering a reward of up to $50,000 for information leading to a conviction in the case.

---------------------------------------------------

OPP twice denied in Mongeon case
 
Kingston Crown refuses to take prison killing to trial, citing doubts about conviction success
 
By Gary Dimmock, The Ottawa CitizenOctober 15, 2009 4:06 AM
 
 
Top police detectives investigating the 1999 prison killing of Donald Mongeon, 27, have twice gone to a Kingston Crown attorney with murder suspects and evidence only to be told the prosecutor didn't think he could win a conviction, according to Ontario Provincial Police files obtained by the Citizen.

The Citizen has also learned that the OPP anti-rackets section has gone to the Crown with the hope of charging prison guards with obstruction of justice, but were told "there was no prospect of conviction," according to an OPP investigation report.

This information is disclosed in an OPP Professional Standards Bureau report of an investigation into the original homicide probe, which concluded that the 1999 investigation, led by respected OPP Inspector Ian Grant, was an "extremely thorough and intense one that left no reasonable investigative avenue unexplored."

Mongeon was a small-time Ottawa thief who was convicted of robbery and sentenced to federal penitentiary. Six months into his sentence, he was stabbed to death at about 4 p.m. on Jan. 16, 1999 at Collins Bay Penitentiary in Kingston.

He died 50 steps from a three-man guard post. The guards have said they didn't hear or see a thing and reported nothing wrong that afternoon at Unit One. The guards told police they did their hourly checks on inmates every hour on the hour through the night, recording nothing out of the ordinary. One guard filed a report -- days later -- saying he saw Mongeon up and alive in his cell after the 11 p.m. lockup.

In fact, Mongeon had been stabbed at least 26 times, once in the heart. The killers wrapped his head with a garbage bag, then stuffed his body under the cell bunk. The floor, the ceiling, the furniture and walls of cell D-18 were spattered with blood. And the cell, on the upper tier in Unit One, had been ransacked.

Still, the guards reported nothing wrong.

In the early morning of Jan. 17, when a guard did report something wrong, he figured Mongeon had stabbed himself 26 times, then wrapped a garbage bag around his head and somehow shuffled under the bunk.

When the OPP were called in, a veteran detective took one look inside the cell and figured it for a homicide right off the bat.

That officer's superiors have, for the past 10 years, figured the same, only they couldn't get Kingston Crown Attorney Bruce Griffith to agree that he could win a conviction against the suspect.

The mother of Donald Mongeon has been fighting for justice for a long time.

"If the police did a competent, thorough job like they say they did, then the evidence is there. And let a judge and a jury decide," said Susan Mongeon. "It's almost 11 years later and I'm still looking for justice.

"Every inmate is a human being and they have families. My son's life mattered. I live with this every single day and I'm not going away. I won't stop fighting until Donald gets the justice he deserves."

This past spring, the Prime Minister's Office, after "carefully" reviewing a heartfelt letter from Mongeon's mother, flagged the unsolved case to the public safety minister.

That letter included a secret police report obtained and later published by the Citizen. The same report was kept secret from a coroner's inquest held in 2008.

The report suggested that prison guards may have lied about doing their hourly checks on inmates, or even could have been "accessory to the murder" of the 27-year-old Ottawa thief.

The OPP has assigned a detective to review the case, 10 years after the original investigation.

Gary Dimmock can be reached at 613-726-6869 or gdimmock@thecitizen.canwest.com

« Last Edit: October 19, 2009, 05:10:55 PM by Chris »

Chris

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Re: Donald Mongeon | Murdered | Collins Bay Penitentiary (Jan 15, 1999)
« Reply #5 on: October 19, 2009, 05:08:42 PM »
I'm very pleased the police are taking another closer look into this case.

It needs to be solved not just for the family and victim, but also because it very likely involves employee's of the prison in some capacity and needs dealt with.

My opinon.... even if the chances are low taht a conviction will be successful, at least it gives the public an idea of what happened and the resulting horror will result in change.

I mean, this case is obviously full of corruption. Suicide? Give me a break.

Glad they are pushing and pushing... good job OPP. Bad job crown attorney.

« Last Edit: October 19, 2009, 05:12:47 PM by Chris »

July

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Re: Donald Mongeon | Murdered | Collins Bay Penitentiary (Jan 16, 1999)
« Reply #6 on: August 31, 2018, 09:40:16 AM »
https://www.muskokaregion.com/news-story/7998846-cold-case-prison-slaying-shrouded-in-secrecy-goes-unsolved-nearly-20-years/

COLD CASE: Prison slaying shrouded in secrecy goes unsolved nearly 20 years
Feb 04, 2018 by Paige Phillips  Huntsville Forester



 Donald Mongeon
Any person with information regarding the person or persons responsible for the murder of Donald Mongeon should immediately contact the director of the Ontario Provincial Police Criminal Investigation Services at 1-888-310-1122 or their nearest police service. Should you wish to remain anonymous, you may call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS (8477) where you may be eligible to receive a cash reward of up to $2,000. - OPP photo

ONTARIO – It's been nearly 20 years and police are seemingly not any closer to solving the murder of Donald Mongeon than they were the day it happened.

Donald Mongeon death has gone unsolved since January of 1999.

At the time of his death, 27-year-old Donald Mongeon was six months into a five-year prison sentence at Collins Bay Institution, located in Kingston, for armed robbery. On Sunday morning, Jan. 17, 1999 at 5:30 a.m., correctional staff found Mongeon’s lifeless body in his locked cell lying in a pool of blood. The death was initially declared a suicide by Correctional Service Canada, though police detectives determined Mongeon’s death a homicide.

Mongeon had been beaten and stabbed 26 times, his cell ransacked and his body was shoved under his cot, a clear plastic garbage bag tied around his neck and head. He was found several hours after he was killed. His cell was just 50 steps from a three-man guard post.

Ongoing news reports of the case have reported that police initially had their sights set on four suspects, but a code of silence among prisoners has hampered the case. Police had once believed they had a case against the guards for potential accessories to murder. However, no criminal charges were ever filed. The guards were instead charged internally and suspended for negligence, according to a 2014 news report.

Avely Serin with Correctional Services Canada said under the Privacy Act, they cannot provide any further comment on cases of individual staff members, but added that Correctional Services Canada employees “are expected to act according to the highest legal and ethical standards and are subject to the same rules of professional conducts and code of discipline as outline in Commissioner’s Directive 060 – Code of Discipline.”

Serin also said that the federal organization “does not tolerate any breach of its policies and all allegations, regardless of the source, are thoroughly investigated by Correctional Services Canada.”

At the time of his death, Mongeon was staying in what has been reported as the “worst block” of the prison. Serin said Mongeon was housed in Unit 1 at the institution, a medium security facility.

“Unit 1 was one of four living units at the time and was where new admissions were generally placed,” according to Correctional Services Canada.

Twelve days after Mongeon’s murder the unit closed indefinitely.

Serin said that at the time of his murder, the unit was in the process of being closed as it had been “badly damaged during a disturbance in November 1998.”

The long-term plan for the institution was to gradually shift the resident inmates to other units within Collins Bay.

“Inmates were given the choice to leave Unit 1 and reside on other units while it was being closed,” said Serin. “Those left in Unit 1 at the time were there because they wished to be.”

Correctional Services Canada was unable to say how many people were house in that unit at the time of Mongeon’s death as the system that tracks inmate population numbers only goes back as far as 2000.

At the time of his death, Serin said three correctional officers were required during the day shift, three during the night shift and one at midnight. Cells were locked every night from 11 p.m. to 7 a.m.

In 2010, the Mongeon family filed $1-millon lawsuit against the Canadian government and six prison guards, claiming negligence by the guards and the administration at Collins Bay that led to the murder of Donald Mongeon. The Ontario Superior Court of Justice dismissed the claim on January 24, 2012. The court declared the action to be statute barred as the two-year limitation period had expired.

In today’s digital age, video cameras and surveillance footage are virtually everywhere and often serve as a vital source for police investigations. However, in 1999 was a different world. In January of 1999, there were no surveillance cameras being used at Collins Bay Institution, making eyewitness testimony essential in this case.

In 2014, it seemed as though there was finally a break in the case when a former inmate came forward with information with hopes of making a deal on newly acquired criminal charges. However, when police said they couldn’t help him, he refused to provide a sworn statement, according to news reports at the time. And police were back where they started.

News reports have suggested that police believed Mongeon was killed for a number of reasons, from skimming drugs he had smuggled into the unit through trailer visits with his girlfriend, failing to smuggle drugs into the prison, wiping out a drug debt owed to him to guards’ involvement.

Between April 1, 1999 and October 15, 2017, there have been 23 deaths in custody at Collins Bay Institution. Corrections Services Canada said that they are not able to provide a further breakdown for the cause of death is it could compromise the inmate’s privacy.

“As in all cases where an individual dies while in federal custody, the police and medical examiner were called in to investigate following the death of Donald Mongeon,” said Serin. “Following Mr. Mongeon’s death, CSC (Correctional Services Canada) convened an internal Board of Investigation (BOI) on February 5, 1999. Like all CSC investigations into non-natural deaths in custody, it includes a member of the community as a board member. We are committed to learning all we can to ensure that future deaths can be prevented.”

No further information was provided on the internal board of investigation.

So, where are police at in this investigation?

Have they made any progress since 1999?

What is their main theory?

Who were the suspects, if any, and where are they now?

Have they received any recent tips?

We don’t know. Police say that at this time they “would not be discussing the cold case” involving Donald Mongeon.

Any person with information regarding the person or persons responsible for the murder of Donald Mongeon should immediately contact the director of the Ontario Provincial Police Criminal Investigation Services at 1-888-310-1122 or their nearest police service. Should you wish to remain anonymous, you may call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS (8477) where you may be eligible to receive a cash reward of up to $2,000.

The province is offering a reward in the amount of $50,000 for information leading to the arrest and conviction of those responsible for the murder of Donald Mongeon.