Author Topic: Is a serial killer masquerading as a long-haul truck driver?  (Read 3973 times)

Chris

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Is a serial killer masquerading as a long-haul truck driver?
« on: August 11, 2009, 10:29:35 AM »
http://www.edmontonsun.com/news/columnists/andrew_hanon/2009/08/11/10422541-sun.html

 Is a serial killer prowling Alberta's highways and truck stops?

"I wouldn't be surprised," said one Edmonton prostitute. "They'd have the perfect opportunity. They can come into town and be long gone before anyone's even missed."

The FBI is putting the trucking industry in the U.S. under a microscope. Since launching its Highway Serial Killings Intitiative, the bureau has arrested 10 people in connection with 30 killings, including one trucker from Tennessee who was charged with four counts of murder.

So far, the FBI has created a database of 500 victims whose bodies have been found on or near major trucking routes across the U.S. -- as well as a list of 200 potential suspects.

According to the FBI's website, "the suspects are predominantly long-haul truck drivers."

The victims are primarily women "living high-risk, transient lifestyles, often involving substance abuse and prostitution. They're frequently picked up at truck stops or service stations and sexually assaulted, murdered and dumped along a highway."

While the vast majority of truckers are law-abiding, the occupation could be seen as a golden opportunity to the vilest predators.

As the FBI puts it, "the mobile nature of the offenders, the unsafe lifestyles of the victims, the significant distances and multiple jurisdictions involved, and the scarcity of witnesses or forensic evidence can make these cases tough to solve."

Killers from one state could pick up a victim in another and dump the body in a third, making the case nearly impossible to figure out.

The FBI's initiative has caught the eye of activists in Western Canada, who say scores of women fitting the U.S. victims' profiles have disappeared or been killed.

All the ingredients are here, said the prostitute, who asked not to be identified for safety reasons.

Prostitutes frequently work truck stops, selling sex to drivers who are often away from home for weeks at a time. If the women want to hit the road, they can trade sex for a ride.

"It happens all the time," said the woman. "Last summer I met a girl who'd hitched a ride to Edmonton from Texas. She worked here until it was too cold, then she said, 'screw it,' and found a trucker willing to take her back south again. Anything could have happened."

The local police task force investigating the deaths and disappearances of women in high-risk lifestyles has studied the FBI's intitiative, said Alberta RCMP spokesman Cpl. Wayne Oakes.

Project Kare routinely shares information and techniques with law enforcement agencies across North America, he said.

"The whole purpose is to identify any linkages or commonalities," he explained.

However, Oakes said the Project Kare files that have come to public light "have little, if any, linkages" with the long-haul trucking cases in the U.S.

Meanwhile, the private detective probing northern B.C.'s Highway of Tears said while there's lots of speculation that a trucker could be involved in some of the nine deaths or disappearances he's investigating, he hasn't come up with any evidence to back up the theory.

Ray Machalko doubts any of the cases on Highway 16 between Prince George and Prince Rupert are connected.

"In my opinion, half of the original nine were simply in the wrong place at the wrong time," said Machalko.

The father of one of the missing women said he's not surprised by the trucking links in the U.S.

"It's certainly isn't something that hasn't come to mind in Nicole's case," said Jack Hoar.

Red Deer's Nicole Hoar, who was working as a tree planter in the area, vanished in June 2002 while hitch-hiking to visit her sister.

capeheart

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Re: Is a serial killer masquerading as a long-haul truck driver?
« Reply #1 on: August 11, 2009, 08:50:56 PM »
Well it is long overdue that they should be checking these truckers. I mean they are the persons who are travelling through and could get away with anything just about. I am not saying every trucker is a criminal, but if that was the lifestyle they chose, sure would be easy for them to get away with it. ??? ??? ???