Author Topic: Kelly Morriseau - Unsolved Murder - Gatineau (Ottawa Area) Dec 10, 2006  (Read 19005 times)

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Gatineau Police Need Public's Help Solving Murder
Cindy Clyne and Michael Hammond
Wednesday, December 13, 2006

The next step for Gatineau police in their latest murder investigation is to set up a mobile command post on Saint Raymond Boulevard to encourage people to come forward with information that may help bring an arrest in the murder of 27 year old Kelly Morriseau.

Lieutenant J.P Lemay says they want the public to report anything they may have seen before or after Sunday's murder, no matter how insignificant it may seem.

Police are ramping up their investigation into the slaying of the woman, who was seven months pregnant when she was found beaten near Gatineau Park early Sunday morning. Police say Morriseau may have been involved in prostitution in the Vanier area of Ottawa, but they won't say if her death is connected to that.

Lieutenant Lemay says police don't have a specific suspect in mind at the moment.


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Thanks to the KindHeart who sent this case in. If I am not mistaken, Gatineau Park is within site of the prime ministers home. I lived in OTtawa for a couple months back in 1993.

Kelly Morriseau was a young native woman and a STW. That would explain the Ottawa press's lack of interest in this case and why we have not even heard of it yet.

If you have any information about this case, please contact the police dept in Gatineau here;
http://www.ville.gatineau.qc.ca/protection-police.htm

Chris

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Thanks Kindheart.

?Dead woman?s aunt victim of unsolved murder in 1991?
By JON WILLING
Winnipeg Police Sgt. Al Bradbury ?right away? thought of one of his cold cases when he saw the name Kelly Morrisseau appear in the news.
Glenda Morrisseau was 19 on July 17, 1991 when she was last seen alive, hitchhiking a ride in downtown Winnipeg. Nearly a month later, her partially naked body was found in an industrial area about 5 km from where she was last seen.
Bradbury didn?t know if Kelly Morrisseau and Glenda Morrisseau were related, but a family member yesterday confirmed Glenda was Kelly?s aunt.
Glenda Morrisseau?s 15-year-old cold case has turned up some ?strong suspects? and breaking it could be just a phone call away, Bradbury said.
Glenda Morrisseau?s body was found Aug. 7, 1991. She received serious trauma to her facial area, including fractured cheekbones, a broken jaw and a fractured eye socket. Police believe she might have died from massive head trauma caused by a large blunt object.
When she was found, Glenda Morrisseau was wearing no clothes from the waist down. Police theorize she was killed and dumped between beams and poles to hide her body. They also believe the killing was sexually motivated.
Similar to Kelly Morrisseau?s case, there were suggestions that Glenda Morrisseau was working in the sex trade, but there is no proof that it?s true.
Detectives were challenged from the start of the investigation because Glenda Morrisseau was missing for a significant amount of time.
Bradbury said since he?s constantly looking over his cold case files, the name Morrisseau jumped out at him when he read it yesterday.
httphttp://ottsun.canoe.ca/News/National/2006/12/14/2788115-sun.html
 


http://www.canada.com/ottawacitizen/news/city/story.html?id=ff516381-0dc6-4fc0-b989-6fae56546f2d&k=66860

Woman fought attackers before she was fatally stabbed, left to die
Andrew Seymour, The Ottawa Citizen
Published: Friday, December 15, 2006
An autopsy shows homicide victim Kelly Morrisseau fought back against her attacker as she was stabbed more than a dozen times, according to police.
Gatineau police Lieut. J.P. Le May said an autopsy on the 27-year-old pregnant mother of three from Vanier showed defensive wounds in addition to more than 12 stab wounds.
None of the knife wounds pierced vital organs, Lieut. Le May added, and Ms. Morrisseau died of massive blood loss. Ms. Morrisseau was stabbed "several places on her body," he said, although he wouldn't specify exactly where.




Kelly Morrisseau was found bleeding in a parking lot.
Jean Levac, the Ottawa Citizen
Police still couldn't say if she had been sexually assaulted.
Ms. Morrisseau died Sunday in hospital about an hour after she was found, naked and bleeding in a parking lot near the Gamelin Street entrance to Gatineau Park at about 5:40 a.m.
Police believe Ms. Morrisseau was involved in prostitution, although her family disputes that claim.
Meanwhile, a Surete du Quebec dive team was called in yesterday from Montreal to start searching a small creek -- a little more than a kilometre from the crime scene -- for evidence.
Police said they received "specific information" from the public that prompted them to launch the search, which resulted in police locating several items.
However, it is too early to say if any of those items, which police would not identify, are related to Ms. Morrisseau's homicide.
During the search, three Surete divers crawled on their hands and knees through several hundred metres of the murky and fast-flowing waters of the creek, which runs between Boulevard du Plateau and a residential neighbourhood near Rue des Cedres.
Earlier in the day, two canine unit officers walked along the banks of the creek, which is a short distance from where police set up their command post on St-Raymond Boulevard yesterday, to solicit public tips.
It is also not far from a Tim Hortons restaurant where police collected surveillance tape and evidence from the men's washroom in the hours after Ms. Morrisseau was found. Police cannot yet say if that evidence is linked to the homicide.
Yesterday, aboriginal elder Alice Blondin-Perrin sang quietly and prayed at a makeshift memorial to Ms. Morrisseau and her unborn child, erected on a tree next to the spot where she was found.
"Our hearts are sore and broken right now, because another native woman has died in Canada of violence," she said, holding an eagle feather and burning sage as she spoke.
Ms. Blondin-Perrin, 58, said she wanted to bless the ground where Ms. Morrisseau, whom she had met several times over the past few years, spent some of her horrible final moments.
"God bless her in heaven. She is not suffering any more," she said.
A more formal memorial for Ms. Morrisseau is planned for tomorrow at 5 p.m. in the parking lot.
Aseymour@thecitizen.canwest.com

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Thanks Kindheart

PostPosted: Fri Jun 08, 2007 4:21 am    Post subject: Reward in Kelly Morrisseau Probe    Reply with quote
June 14, 2007

SOGC responds to AFN call for assistance in solving the homicide of Kelly Morrisseau

Ottawa ? The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada (SOGC) today answered the call of the Assembly of First Nations and National Chief Phil Fontaine by donating $10,000 to assist in the investigation of the homicide of Kelly Morrisseau.

Dr. André Lalonde, Executive Vice President of the SOGC, stated that the loss of Kelly Morrisseau and her unborn child cannot be overlooked by the Ottawa and Gatineau communities.

?As a society we cannot ignore a crime of this nature. Violence against women and how we address it as a society will determine the level of health we can achieve,? he said.

?The SOGC is a women?s health organization based in Ottawa, and we have made a strong commitment towards Aboriginal health and advancing the aspects of health that effect Aboriginal women in Canada. I am completely appalled at the lack of response in Ottawa and by the community at large. Not only have we lost a young First Nations woman, we have also suffered the loss of her unborn child. These two dynamics combined are unacceptable.?

National Chief Phil Fontaine, along with the family of Kelly Morrisseau, expressed their gratitude for the SOGC?s quick response and called for others to join them in donating to the Crimestoppers reward program.

?I?m so happy to hear someone agrees with us that this issue ? violence against First Nations women?is something we cannot let go by unnoticed,? National Chief Fontaine said.

Michelle Morrisseau, Kelly?s aunt, said the family is very happy to learn of the SOGC generosity.

?Hopefully, now other people will come forward and we can get some information to resolve this,? she said.

Jim Wiles, a spokesman for Crimestoppers, was also elated and called the donation fantastic.

?We?re happy to hear that the public is starting to be aware of what has gone on,? Wiles said, adding, ?They (tipsters) can contact us with information regarding the case 24 hours a day. Everything is totally anonymous.?


The $10,000 donation is being added to the based $2000 reward offered by Crimestoppers and the $2000 donated by the Assembly of First Nations last week.

Anyone with information regarding the stabbing death of Kelly Morrisseau, 27, and her unborn child is asked to call Crimestoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS (or 8477) or Gatineau Police at 819-243-2345.

The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada
http://www.sogc.com

Assembly of First Nations
http://www.afn.ca

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Assembly of First Nations National Chief calls for the public's assistance in solving the homicide of Kelly Morrisseau

OTTAWA, June 7, 2007

Today, National Chief Phil Fontaine, in a joint media conference with Crimestoppers, the Gatineau Police Department, and members of the family of Kelly Morrisseau, made a public plea that anyone with information regarding the stabbing death of Ms Morrisseau contact police or Crimestoppers.

"The lack of a resolution to this crime is not just a women's issue. This is everyone's issue. Everyone has mothers and daughters, nieces and aunts. And
Kelly Morrisseau was all of these," National Chief Phil Fontaine told the
gathering in Ottawa.

"Kelly was also seven months pregnant at the time, so this is double the
loss for her family to bear, and her community."

Crimestoppers is offering a reward of up to $2000 for tips resulting in
an arrest and the Assembly of First Nations is matching that $2000, for a
total of $4000, the National Chief said.

He also called on corporations, small business and other organizations to
donate to the fund.

Claude Parent, of Crimestoppers, said to date the civil organization has received very few tips regarding the case, but that they can now be made
anonymously online.

Captain Roger Cloutier, of the Gatineau Police Department said police are taking the case very seriously and that any information regarding Ms Morrisseau's murder - whether it be first-hand or not - is welcome.

Crimestoppers can be reached at 1-800-222-TIPS (or 8477)
http://capital.crimestoppers.ca

For Gatineau Police call 819-243-2345
http://www.ville.gatineau.qc.ca/index-ang.htm

Assembly of First Nations
http://www.afn.ca

- - - - - - -

Ottawa, Ontario (June 7, 2007) ? An update on the Kelly Morrisseau homicide was delivered this morning by the Gatineau Police in collaboration with the Assembly of First Nations, Crime Stoppers and members of the Morrisseau family. The reward offered for information related to her murder was increased to $4,000 and members of the corporate community have been asked to get involved to ensure justice is delivered.

Beverley Jacobs, President of the Native Women?s Association of Canada (NWAC), commends the announcement made in the unsolved murder of Ms. Morrisseau. ?Kelly was murdered in cold blood this past December in Gatineau Park. She is sorely missed by her family and friends and justice needs to be served. NWAC?s Sisters in Spirit Initiative is working to raise the public consciousness and ensure that Canadians are alerted of the alarmingly high rates of the missing and murdered Aboriginal women in Canada and ensure that these tragedies are averted in the future.?

There has been little progress in the Kelly Morriseau case until today?s announcement. Kelly Morrisseau was an Aboriginal woman, a good mother to three young children and looking forward to the birth of her new baby. She is dearly missed by her children, friends and her close family.

Aboriginal women are the target of racialized and sexualized violence in Canada. NWAC urges anyone who has any information related to this case to contact Crime Stoppers at 1.800.222.TIPS or to visit their website at http://www.crimestoppers.ca to leave an anonymous tip.

The Native Women?s Association of Canada is an aggregate of 13 native women?s organizations and is the national voice of Aboriginal women in Canada.

www.nwac-hq.org
- - - - - - -

BACKGROUND ON THE MURDER OF KELLY MORRISSEAU
http://www.turtleisland.org/discussion/viewtopic.php?p=7859#7859
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Chris

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Re: Kelly Morriseau - Unsolved Murder - Gatineau (Ottawa Area) Dec 10, 2006
« Reply #5 on: September 19, 2007, 11:38:24 PM »
From Kindheart


Police to post sketch of suspect in Kelly Morrisseau slaying
Gatineau police are working on a composite sketch of a suspect in the slaying of a pregnant Ottawa woman in a western Quebec park nine months ago.

Police began the sketch after meeting with an important witness about the slaying of 27-year-old Kelly Morrisseau, a Gatineau police news release Tuesday.

Gatineau police say they have talked to an important witness about the slaying of 27-year-old Kelly Morrisseau.
(Gignul Non-profit Housing Corp.) Gatineau police will be holding a news conference with Crime Stoppers and the Assembly of First Nations on Wednesday morning.

Morrisseau, who lived in Ottawa but grew up on the Sagkeeng First Nation, north of Winnipeg, was found naked, bleeding and near death in a Gatineau Park parking lot on Dec. 10.

She died later in hospital. At the time, the mother of three children was seven months pregnant with a fourth.

A reward worth more than $20,000 for information about her slaying has been posted by the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada, Crime Stoppers, the Assembly of First Nations and other donors.

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/ottawa/story/2007/09/18/ot-morrisseau-090918.html

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Re: Kelly Morriseau - Unsolved Murder - Gatineau (Ottawa Area) Dec 10, 2006
« Reply #6 on: November 17, 2007, 01:54:30 AM »
From Kindheart

Gary Dimmock, The Ottawa Citizen
Published: Saturday, March 17, 2007
The lead came in almost overnight, and the intimate details of the crime, yet to be revealed in the press, had homicide detectives on the hunt early on for a suspect they still can't find.

Detectives working the Gatineau parking-lot slaying of 27-year-old Kelly Morrisseau got the remarkable tip early on in the probe: The young mother, pregnant with another child, was killed over a handful of crack cocaine.

The tip came from an informant in a Vanier neighbourhood known for its street prostitution and crack houses. It was Ms. Morrisseau's neighbourhood, and on its streets she occasionally sold her body for sex along Deschamps and Lafontaine streets.


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Font:****It's a tightknit neighbourhood often trolled by police for information on the criminal underworld, from details on the latest drug dealer to what the Hells Angels are up to.

It was from this street network that a longtime police contact came forward to Ontario authorities with details about the crime. They passed it to the Quebec detectives trying to solve Ms. Morrisseau's killing. She had been found Dec. 10 by a man walking a dog early in the morning. She was barely alive, bleeding to death after someone had stabbed her a dozen times.

The tip included details about the crime -- including the name of the victim and how she was killed, before they were known to the public -- which led detectives to take it seriously. The tipster told police drugs were involved. The tip included a detailed description of a man seen with Ms. Morrisseau before she died. It also included the man's street name.

Police are uncomfortable with revealing detailed information about the tip for fear the man will discover he's a suspect, or at least someone the police want to question, and go into hiding.

The man has not been seen in Vanier since.

The woman's family told the Citizen in December that they had no idea why someone would want Ms. Morrisseau dead.

Police said early in the investigation that they had collected valuable evidence that could lead them to the killer, including blood samples collected in a Tim Hortons washroom. Quebec detectives are now waiting for the final results of DNA tests.

The security cameras at the Tim Hortons captures video images from both entrances, and would track anyone heading into the bathroom. The restaurant is about a kilometre west of the parking lot where Ms. Morrisseau was found.

Police also seized at least 12 items from the bathroom, including a garbage bag.

Police also got videotape from surveillance cameras from a nearby coffee shop on St-Raymond Boulevard.

Early reports from a pathologist showed that Ms. Morrisseau had defensive wounds, indicating that she fought against her killer.

She was too weak to say anything when she was found. She could only summon enough strength to blink.

Her blinks, if they were a call for help, still go unanswered.

gdimmock@thecitizen.canwest.com

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Re: Kelly Morriseau - Unsolved Murder - Gatineau (Ottawa Area) Dec 10, 2006
« Reply #7 on: December 12, 2007, 11:38:52 PM »
From kinhdeart

On December 10, 2006, Kelly Morrisseau

was found stabbed and clinging to life in a parking

lot near Gatineau Park. One year after her cousin?s

brutal murder, Roxanne Morrisseau shares her

memories of growing up with Kelly in Winnipeg?s

notorious North End, their decision to seek a better

life in Ottawa, and the pain of still not knowing how

Kelly spent her final days or who killed her

 

by Rob Thomas

On a cool late-fall morning, Roxanne Morrisseau lines up at the coffee counter on the lower floor of the Terrasses de la Chaudière government complex in Gatineau and orders a crème caramel coffee. Crème caramel is Roxanne?s favourite.Unfortunately, there?s none brewed at the moment. ?You?re the only one who drinks it,? the woman behind the counter explains. Then she tells Roxanne to hold on while she brews a new batch especially for her. ?Thank you so much,? Roxanne says. ?You?ve made my day.? She gives a broad smile before adding, ?It doesn?t take much.?this day is especially hard for Roxanne, who has agreed to meet to reflect back on the short life and brutal death of her cousin, Kelly Morrisseau, who died one year ago. On a cold December morning in 2006, in a parking lot on the fringe of Gatineau Park, a man walking his dog found a young woman clinging to life in a pool of blood. Kelly Morrisseau, just 27 and seven months pregnant, had been stripped naked and stabbed more than a dozen times. Though too weak to speak, she was still conscious when police and ambulance arrived. She was rushed to hospital but had lost too much blood and died soon after.Roxanne says she thinks about her cousin every morning as she crosses the Ottawa River on her way to work. It?s a painful daily ritual, and today was particularly difficult. ?I work, and I?m a full-time mom on the weekends, so I sort of hide my pain. I hide my tears. But every once in a while, I feel like I can?t deal with it, I can?t take it, and I just break down,? Roxanne explains. ?Today was one of those days. Coming in on the bus this morning, I couldn?t stop thinking about the cold weather and thinking about Kelly?s last moments. I look at the Gatineau sign, and I just start thinking too much.?Roxanne speaks quietly, glancing around to make sure none of her co-workers are nearby. For three years, she has been an entitlement officer with Indian Affairs. Wearing conservative dark slacks and a blouse, her long dark hair pulled back, and the inevitable pass card on a cord around her neck, she looks like any other civil servant in the hulking government complex. Her life now is far removed from the troubled streets of Winnipeg?s notorious North End, where she grew up in ?the

developments? surrounded by poverty, addiction, and native gangs. Her friends and colleagues today ?don?t know about my past,? she says. ?A lot of people here probably think things were handed to me, but they weren?t. It was a struggle and 0.0001 per cent makes it through. I was lucky.? She says the brutality of Kelly?s murder has left her family badly shaken and brought back painful memories of another death 16 years ago. Kelly?s aunt, Glenda Morrisseau, was 19

years old when her partly clothed body was discovered in a secluded industrial area in Winnipeg. Her face had been badly disfigured. ?They found her on my 11th birthday,? says Roxanne in a soft voice. ?It was so hard for me, because I looked up to her and loved her. She was the person that I loved most in the world. ?I never thought that I would lose her, and I did. And I never thought that I would ever go through anything that traumatic ever again?and I did.?it seems shocking that one family could have lost two women in such violent ways. But Beverley Jacobs, president of the Native Women?s Association of Canada, has seen so much of this kind of grief that she?s not surprised. The association estimates that as many as 500 women have disap-

peared or died violently in the past 20 years. And they aren?t alone in raising those concerns. A 2004 report by Amnesty International outlines the factors that have pushed so many aboriginal women to the fringes of Canadian society, making them vulnerable to violence and murder. Those factors include poverty, discrimination, and government policies that disenfranchised native women and separated native children from their families. Jacobs cites a similar list and

calls it ?the effects of colonization.? These are issues that Roxanne Morrisseau knows all too well. She says most of the people she grew up around in Winnipeg succumbed to the sense of hopelessness that pervades many native communities. ?There?s an extreme lack of education. And there are a lot of people that are so stuck on drugs and alcohol that their children are not being cared for in an appropriate way. It just goes on and on, over and over,? she explains. ?It seems there is nowhere for you to turn. Nowhere for you to look. You don?t know what to

do with yourself. You don?t know how to better things when everything around you is so messed up. You feel helpless and hopeless. And you get used to it.?that?s the kind Of life Roxanne and Kelly Morrisseau sought to escape. In 1995, scared of the violence on their doorsteps and determined to shield their baby daughters from it, the two teens bought bus tickets and fled to Ottawa, moving into a two-bedroom apartment in Vanier. Roxanne was 16. Kelly was 17. The catalyst for their sudden departure was the death of a mutual friend. Eighteen-year-old Terry

Acoby had been brutally beaten to death with a baseball bat. Reports in the Winnipeg ewspapers described Acoby as a gang member, something Roxanne vehemently denies. ?He was a good boy, and it hurt his mother so much to read that,? she remembers, noting that in her neighbourhood, just talking to someone who lived on the wrong street could lead to a beating.

Though they didn?t have much choice, in retrospect Roxanne says Vanier wasn?t the best place for the two teens to settle. ?Coming to Ottawa, it was so different that I didn?t know I was immersing myself in a bad neighbourhood,? she says. ?In fact, compared to where I came from,

Vanier seemed like a child?s playground to me. I didn?t see what it was becoming.?Delores Peltier sees such teenage mothers on the run all too often. She?s a tenant-relations officer with Gignul Non-Profit Housing Corporation, an Ottawa company that provides affordable hous-

ing to aboriginal people. More than half the company?s tenants are single mothers; at different times, both Kelly and Roxanne lived in Gignul housing.Most of the women who come to the

city are trying to get away from things, trying to lead a better life,? Peltier explains. ?A lot of the time, they find that they face new challenges here. When they get to the city, they need to think about where they have to live and what kind of support is available for them.? Inexperienced youngsters face many problems?some new and some (depressingly) the very ones they had hoped to escape. To keep rents affordable, just over half of the company?s 173 rental units are in

Vanier, a district where many of the city?s crack houses are situated and that contains well known pockets where street prostitutes work. But Roxanne tried to hang tough. Though she had left Winnipeg with only a Grade 9 education, over the next few years, she hit the books, attending Rideau High School.She gave birth to her second daughter at the age of 20 but

persevered and graduated with her high-school diploma two years later in 2001. ?It?s embarrassing,? she says. ?That wasn?t that long ago.?From there, she headed to Algonquin College, completing the correctional-worker program and a general arts-and-science diploma in aboriginal studies. She admits that it was a real struggle and speaks with pride of her success. ?I was stubborn and very determined,? she says. ?If somebody said no to me, I?d try to find a way to turn it into a yes.? Still, she says, she couldn?t have done it without help, particularly from her cousin Kelly. When it came time to go to college, it was a choice of who was going and who would stay home and watch the kids,? Roxanne explains haltingly. ?I don?t know if it was selfish at the time, but she looked after my daughters while I was in school. She helped me.? During those years when Roxanne was making her way through college and Kelly was babysit-

ting, Kelly gave birth to two more children, both sons. By 2005, the two women?s lives had begun to move in dramatically different directions. Roxanne graduated from college and found work with a federal halfway house before moving to her current job at Indian Affairs. Busy

with a full-time job and her two young daughters, she began to see her cousin less often.

It?s hard to say exactly what was happening in Kelly?s life around the same time. Family members who were closer to Kelly than Roxanne was at this juncture are reluctant to say. And it

seems clear that Kelly took care to hide her increasingly troubled life from family and friends who might have helped her. It was around that time that she began to use crack cocaine and was

charged with assaulting her long-time boyfriend, Michael Giroux, with a knife. In December 2005, Kelly?s three children were taken from her. Roxanne says she knew nothing about

her cousin?s drug use. ?She never would have shown me that. It?s not something she would have been proud of. I know I can say that I?ve never seen her use it.And I can?t imagine her doing that.?Kelly?s sister, Farris Morrisseau, says though Kelly tried to hide her struggles with addiction from even immediate family, her troubles became impossible to hide once her children were taken away. ?She had her kids, and they were what made her happy,? Farris says. ?When she lost her kids, she really got worse. She would cry for her kids.? That kind of situation is one of the biggest challenges for Children?s Aid, says Deborah Chansonneuve. An active mem-

ber of the aboriginal community, she has studied cultural and family violence issues for many years. For their own safety, children must be removed from homes of addiction or violence, and yet the effect of the removal is often devastating for the single mother. ?It?s profoundly traumatizing to have someone take away your children and to have no idea when or if they?ll be returned,? she says. ?When a parent is vulnerable to addiction, the relationship with the children is often one of their few strengths. If that?s taken away, you also take away that sense of purpose, the ability to work on the problem.?Initially, though, Kelly seemed to muster the will to get her

life back on track. Farris Morrisseau invited her sister to join her in Winnipeg, where she says Kelly seemed to kick her drug habit. She put on weight, and they looked for work together.

Six months later, Kelly had to return to Ottawa to plead guilty to assaulting her boyfriend. She told Farris that while she was there, she planned to fight to get her kids back. It was back in Ottawa that Kelly seems to have drifted quickly back into the street life of Vanier. She had no fixed address and just stayed with friends, her mother, or Giroux?s mother. Nobody really knew where she was. Worse, she started to do drugs again. Police have said that Kelly was

associated with drugs and prostitution and that the latter may have played a role in her death.

Reflecting today on her cousin?s life at this low point shortly before her death, Roxanne Morrisseau thinks back to the generations of damage that disrupted so many native families.

She sees women like Kelly as victims of the lingering trauma of residential schools, which undermined children?s cultural roots and family connections. (They were forced to speak only

English, so Roxanne has only vague and distant memories of hearing Ojibway spoken. ?I can?t even speak my own native language,? she says.) And at their worst, the schools were sites

of systematic violence and abuse?a fact that both Roxanne?s and Kelly?s mothers are only now coming to terms with.?They were beaten and badly abused, in more ways than you can imagine,? Roxanne says. ?So they never had the opportunity to learn how to be parents. To learn how to show affection.They were badly abused. They were beaten and tortured.?Understanding this has helped her come to terms with the defects of her own upbringing. ?It makes me love my mom, my whole family, all the more because of the abuse they endured.I know they?re very strong people, because they?re still here,? Roxanne says, adding that their pasts have made it impossible

for her mother and aunt to claw their way out of poverty the way she has. ?You can?t take an innocent child and immerse them in a totally bad environment and expect them to make it.?

One year after Kelly Morrisseau?s death, Roxanne says she still finds it hard to reconcile her family memories of Kelly with the way her life turned out and the way it ended. She remembers her cousin as a loving mother, someone who sacrificed herself for others and greeted every situa-

tion with a smile. ?We were always together back then, and I was always the rough, tough one, pushing my way through things,? she says sadly. ?Now I think of her as the strong one,

because she went out like a soldier.? In that deserted parking lot, Gatineau police say, Kelly

evidently tried to fight off her attacker. And on days like today, Roxanne can?t stop herself from imagining the way her cousin died?fighting for her life, hanging on despite her wounds, thinking of her family and her children, hoping that someone would arrive in time to save her. Kelly Morrisseau?s life was a struggle right up to its last moments.At press time, police had not made an arrest in the case. Roxanne says she has had dreams about the man in the sketch

police have released to the public. She says she tries to catch the man, but he always seems to be just out of reach. Though she knows someone is directly responsible for Kelly?s death, she says she also believes that society has played a role, pushing young native women to its margins, where they may fall prey to men who believe that they won?t be missed.And she?s not alone in her struggle to understand the terrible pattern of violence. The Native Women?s Association of

Canada is in the midst of a five-year project to document the experiences of families like hers. Called Sisters In Spirit, its aim is to raise awareness of the plight of native women. Roxanne,

her mother, and Kelly?s mother are sharing their family?s sad stories in the hope that others will learn from them.

 

 

December 2007/January 2008 OTTAWA

kindheart

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Re: Kelly Morriseau - Unsolved Murder - Gatineau (Ottawa Area) Dec 10, 2006
« Reply #8 on: January 14, 2008, 11:03:30 AM »
The young mother, pregnant with another child, was killed over a handful of crack cocaine.

F**k, I cannot wait until they arrest this PIECE OF SHIT. I feel real soon this one will be solved. ;D ;D ;D

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Re: Kelly Morriseau - Unsolved Murder - Gatineau (Ottawa Area) Dec 10, 2006
« Reply #9 on: February 23, 2008, 08:45:43 AM »
Wow, that is cold. THere was a murder in Calgary over $10 last summer, $10 for crack. Very cold.

Chris

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What a great idea.

waabzy

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Re: Kelly Morriseau - Unsolved Murder - Gatineau (Ottawa Area) Dec 10, 2006
« Reply #11 on: December 05, 2008, 12:57:26 PM »
   


**** THERE IS NOW A $20,500 REWARD HELP RAISE THAT AMOUNT AND SOLVE THIS CASE ****


DEC. 10, 2008
A Moment of Silence for Kelly.
One year to the day Kelly Morrisseau was murdered.

waabzy

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Re: Kelly Morriseau - Unsolved Murder - Gatineau (Ottawa Area) Dec 10, 2006
« Reply #12 on: December 05, 2008, 02:03:11 PM »
Kelly's Aunt Glenda Morriseau was also murdered.
The Glenda Morrisseau Murder
http://www.winnipeg.ca/police/Unsolved_Cases/Homicides/1991_morrisseau.stm



Glenda Morrisseau, an attractive nineteen-year-old student at R.B. Russell School, was last seen alive during the early morning hours of Wednesday, July 17, 1991. She was last seen at 2:30 a.m. on Logan Avenue hitching-hiking a ride downtown from the Stock Exchange Hotel. She was reported missing by her sister several days later when she did not return home.

After nearly a month of searching, Morrisseau?s partially naked and battered body was discovered on Wednesday, August 7, 1991, in a St. Boniface industrial area, about five kilometers from where she was last seen. Her body was located near the end of Youville Street near the Seine River between some large wooden beams and poles in a field used by a local firm for storing heavy equipment. She was found by one of the employees of the company who notified the police.

Map indicating where Glenda Morrisseau's body was foundAs it appeared that Morrisseau?s body had been in the field for some time, the cause of death was not easily determinable. However, there was considerable damage to her facial area including fractured cheekbones, a broken jaw and a fractured eye socket. As such she may have died as a result of massive trauma to the head inflicted by a large blunt object. Furthermore, it is believed that the assault happened elsewhere and that her body was just dumped where it was found to delay discovery.

When she was found, Morrisseau was wearing only a T-shirt, jacket and socks. She had no clothing on the lower part of her body. As her pants and underwear were not found at the scene, it supports the theory that she was killed elsewhere and merely dumped between the beams and poles to hide her body. It also suggests that the killing was sexually motivated and that the inside of the suspect?s vehicle would have been covered in Morrisseau?s blood.

Although there were suggestions that Morrisseau was a prostitute, there is no evidence that this was true. However, Morrisseau did enjoy drinking, parties and was known to be flirtatious with older men if they would buy her drinks. As such, someone she was flirting with at the bar may have misunderstood her intentions. This person may have been someone Morrisseau met before or after leaving the Stock Exchange Hotel, or someone who picked her up while hitch-hiking the morning she disappeared (possibly someone from the hotel).

Photo indicating where Glenda Morrisseau's body was foundUnfortunately, as Morrisseau was last seen hitch-hiking and because her body was not discovered for nearly a month, investigators were hampered in their abilities to solve this crime as Morrisseau?s activities immediately prior to her death were not easy to establish. However, it is believed that Morrisseau was killed on or about July 17, 1991, shortly after she was last seen on Logan Avenue.

It is believed that the vehicle used by the killer, even if cleaned would still have traces of Morrisseau?s blood in the fibres. The killer may have disposed of the vehicle shortly after the murder, however anyone with information identifying the suspect and this vehicle should contact the police. It is believed the killer would have been familiar with the St. Boniface area. It is possible the vehicle used had light yellow seat covers.http://www.winnipeg.ca/police/Unsolved_Cases/Homicides/1991_morrisseau.stm

Miss R

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Re: Kelly Morriseau - Unsolved Murder - Gatineau (Ottawa Area) Dec 10, 2006
« Reply #13 on: September 28, 2010, 01:51:07 PM »

jellybean

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Re: Kelly Morriseau - Unsolved Murder - Gatineau (Ottawa Area) Dec 10, 2006
« Reply #14 on: December 28, 2010, 05:29:47 PM »
1991? This has been a long time.  Perhaps Despere can help? I believe this person is keeping a log for our site.  Might be similar instances in this area, with similar brutality that took this young woman's life?