Author Topic: Trafficking kids:::  (Read 2206 times)

Adrian

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Trafficking kids:::
« on: January 29, 2009, 06:19:15 AM »

Interesting article, and also scary!

Quote
At 17, Eve escaped 2 1/2 years of sexual slavery under Nakpangi and led police to a Mississauga motel room where a 14-year-old girl was being pimped out by him.

Last year, Eve detailed the horrors to the Sun -- of being forced to service more than a dozen men a day, seven days a week, through her period and yeast infections, all the while handing over every penny to Nakpangi.


MP wants stiffer penalties for trafficking kids
By TAMARA CHERRY, SUN MEDIA
   

TORONTO -- If Imani Nakpangi had been convicted of human trafficking in the United States, he would have faced at least 20 years in jail.

In Canada, he was handed five years -- three for trafficking a teenager and two for living off the avails of a teenaged prostitute.

There is no mandatory minimum sentence for human trafficking convictions in Canada, not even for children.

A private member's bill to be tabled in the House of Commons this afternoon will set out to change that.

Winnipeg MP Joy Smith, who has crusaded tirelessly to raise awareness about slavery in Canada, will introduce a bill calling for a minimum sentence of five years for those who traffic minors, the Sun has learned.

In a country that is several strides behind in addressing the flesh trade, this is Smith's latest effort to catch up.

"The light sentencing for this horrific offence is very callous disregard for the severity of this crime," Smith said in an interview this week. "There's clearly a need for Parliament to provide additional guidance to the courts on the trafficking of minors and formally denounce trafficking of minors."

ESCAPE

At 17, Eve escaped 2 1/2 years of sexual slavery under Nakpangi and led police to a Mississauga motel room where a 14-year-old girl was being pimped out by him.

Last year, Eve detailed the horrors to the Sun -- of being forced to service more than a dozen men a day, seven days a week, through her period and yeast infections, all the while handing over every penny to Nakpangi.

Unlike authorities in the U.S., where any minor used for commercial sex is considered a human trafficking victim, Peel Regional Police couldn't lay the charge for the younger girl, who insisted she was in love with her pimp, that the work was on her own accord.

Last May, Eve's tale led to the first human trafficking conviction in Canada.

"He'll be serving less time in jail for the exploitation of this girl at the end of the day than he spent exploiting her," said Benjamin Perrin, a University of British Columbia-based human trafficking expert who helped draft Smith's bill. "Even on the most basic form of justice that people would think about in terms of an eye for an eye, you don't even see that here."

In Montreal, Michael Lennox Mark pleaded guilty to trafficking a 17-year-old girl and procuring three others -- one under 18 -- to become prostitutes.

He got two years for the trafficking charge and two years for the procuring, to be served concurrently.

But because his year of pre-trial custody counted as double, following his sentencing, Mark spent just one week in jail for the crimes against his four victims.

That's more than Jacques Leonard-St. Vil got for his trafficking of a 20-year-old woman outside Toronto -- a 36-month sentence, cancelled out completely by pre-trial custody.

In 2005, Canada ratified the United Nations' Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the sale of children, child prostitution and pornography. Part of that protocol read: "Each state party shall make such offences punishable by appropriate penalties that take into account their grave nature."

"This is really a glaring omission," Perrin said. "We had hoped that when courts began sentencing child traffickers, they would be recognizing that as a very serious factor, but that has turned out not to be the case."

From the U.S. to Dominican Republic, several countries already carry minimum sentences for human traffickers.

"You look at the other countries that have far stiffer sentences, it kind of makes me sick," Smith said. "We're not a third world country. And this is very, very necessary."

An October report of the Canada-United States Consultation in Preparation for World Congress III Against Sexual Exploitation of Children and Adolescents recommended: "In Canada, amend the Criminal Code to provide a mandatory minimum penalty for child trafficking."

When it comes to this crime, rarely does the language used by non-governmental organizations regarding Canada include "paving the way."

'VERY LENIENT'

"I definitely think there needs to be some kind of changes so that we can follow along their footsteps," Rebecca Whittaker, managing director of Calgary-based The Future Group, said of examples set south of the border. "This (bill) is just the first battle, I think."

"In terms of sentencing in Canada for crimes against children in general, they are very, very, very lenient," Beyond Borders president Rosalind Prober said from Winnipeg.

"Traffickers of human beings, especially children, are not individuals that should get a slap on the wrist," she said. "A message should be sent from the courtroom -- and that's what Joy Smith is trying to do -- that there is no tolerance for this type of behaviour."

Nearly two years ago, a motion tabled by Smith calling on the government to adopt a comprehensive strategy to combat human trafficking was passed by a unanimous vote in the House of Commons.

That strategy still hasn't been created.

But still, Smith is hopeful.

"This for me has been such a long struggle over such a long period of time," Smith said. Of today's bill, she said, "It's not enough. It's just, you know, the beginning.

"We're talking about sexual abuse, rape and exploitation of our children ... They come from good homes; they come from bad homes; they come from the streets; they come from the reserves; they come from every walk of life.

"We haven't sent forth a strong enough message and it's time we do that."

---

MINIMUM JAIL TERMS

Canada

- Human trafficking minors or adults: 0-14 years.

- With aggravating circumstances, such as murder or aggravated assault: Up to life.

United States

- Human trafficking of child under 14: Minimum 15 years.

- Trafficking of a child 14-18: Minimun 10 years.

Dominican Republic

- Human trafficking: 15-20 years.

- Trafficking of a child: An additional five years.

Chris

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Re: Trafficking kids:::
« Reply #1 on: January 31, 2009, 12:00:57 AM »
You can get probation for this in Canada?

Adrian

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Re: Trafficking kids:::
« Reply #2 on: January 31, 2009, 12:36:58 AM »


Yep. Can you believe this?  That's Canada for you. No wonder these freaks are getting away with murder. They can take down a few of the White Posse, but drive by a kid standing on a corner. >:(

mauvelilac

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Re: Trafficking kids:::
« Reply #3 on: January 31, 2009, 02:42:26 PM »
This just isn't right. No doubt this is where some of our missing children are. Give me five minutes alone with these creeps. I'll do a Lorena Bobbitt on them. I would gladly go to jail to make these low lifes suffer as they have made innocent young teens suffer.

lostlinganer

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Re: Trafficking kids:::
« Reply #4 on: January 31, 2009, 03:26:09 PM »
What I don't understand is why there are not some sort of vigilantes taking this scum down - I mean there are a lot of powerful people out there who don't believe in honesty (white collar crime etc.) that you would think would take out these types of filth.  I mean even the low-lifes have their limits.
Most of all, we all know that if we, ourselves, didn't believe in God almighty...a higher power, we would be watching for an opportunity to snuff out someone like this ... without a doubt.  I know if I had been raised without religion, I would probably be in a penitentiary now, because I would do it...  ergo, what's stopping all these tough guys out there who worship their mother and their sister and brothers - very few believe in God any more.??? >:(