Author Topic: TASER Testing:::by Cops...  (Read 3271 times)

Adrian

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TASER Testing:::by Cops...
« on: December 12, 2008, 07:48:27 PM »
Now don't you be thinking wrong of me folks, but I seriously believe these taser testings, should be done BY the police on each other. This weapon has been known to kill.

Please press link for another article.
http://www.edmontonsun.com/News/Edmonton/2008/12/12/7732181.html

Tasering should be outlawed. Use pepper spray. Tasering is just too easy for some cops around here...

    
December 12, 2008
City police to test 161 Tasers
Over 100 more than was originally announced
By SUN MEDIA
   

Edmonton police will have 161 of their Taser stun guns tested to ensure they're operating properly.

A statement issued this afternoon said they have far more of the Tasers under scrutiny than first thought.

Yesterday Chief Mike Boyd estimated the force had 33 of the Taser X26 models that had been purchased before 2005.

But Solicitor General Fred Lindsay ordered all police forces in the province to test Taser X26 models that had been purchased before 2006 after a CBC investigation revealed that they can be prone to use more current than the manufacturer's specifications.

The testing is expected to take begin in January and take about two months.
« Last Edit: December 12, 2008, 07:54:55 PM by Adrian »

mauvelilac

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Re: TASER Testing:::by Cops...
« Reply #1 on: December 13, 2008, 01:10:26 PM »
There was a debate about this in Ottawa a few months ago. I think it was Ottawa, could have been Quebec but an MP stated something to the effect that tasering couldn't hurt that much. He let a reporter taser him and soon found out it was no picnic in the park.
I agree with you Adrian. There's been too many taser deaths in Canada since it was started being used.
These police officers should see first hand the effects it has on people before they indiscriminately use them.

lostlinganer

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Re: TASER Testing:::by Cops...
« Reply #2 on: December 13, 2008, 10:45:25 PM »
I don't think you should expect to do to someone else, what you wouldn't want done to you.  .....as far as necessary preventions go.  If you want to use a "stund gun", you should take a wack of it first.  I am saying this because I really do believe that the police organizations think they are the "be all" of control today.  I believe they have too much attitude using it as a safe recourse -when it may not be all that safe.  It doesn't seem to be the little slap on the paws they expect us to accept; thus, they use it all too freely.  In this case, maybe they should let someone tazer them a few times.  Maybe then, they will be a little more conservative about letting it "rip".  Most of all, there are a lot of really strange effects which this machine has on different "states of mind" or physical pre-disposed conditions which accompany stessful situations; and, which are seemingly unexpected dangerous side effects that have never been researched thoroughly imho.

Adrian

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Re: TASER Testing:::by Cops...
« Reply #3 on: December 16, 2008, 05:00:20 AM »
TASERING::: it has to stop.

By THE CANADIAN PRESS
   

VANCOUVER -- A critic of Taser use said yesterday that the RCMP doesn't appear to be learning lessons following the death of Robert Dziekanski, who was jolted by a police Taser last year.

The B.C. Crown announced last week that the four officers involved in the incident at Vancouver International Airport were acting properly and won't face charges.

Mounties said there have been several changes to their Taser policies, including restricting the cases in which Tasers can be used and improved training, but police said none of those changes would have altered what happened to Dziekanski.

Alex Neve, head of Amnesty International Canada, said yesterday that those changes aren't sufficient and Canadians still don't believe the Taser should have been used in the Dziekanski case.

Neve said the RCMP's continued defence of its officers' actions shows that the policies don't go far enough.

Neve said Canadian police forces should suspend Taser use until more information is known about their effects.

mauvelilac

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Re: TASER Testing:::by Cops...
« Reply #4 on: December 22, 2008, 06:42:44 PM »
I was just reading in todays newspaper that a man is in critical condition in Gander, Nfld after being tasered
by the police. They tasered him because they felt he was a direct threat to their welfare because he took an axe to their cruiser. They (the police) decided tasering him was better than pulling their service revolver.
Either way this man might die.

Spartacus

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Re: TASER Testing:::by Cops...
« Reply #5 on: January 23, 2009, 12:18:47 PM »
Police in Toronto tazered a low functioning autistic person lying in bed asleep. I know the guy. From what I read about it, his mother was outside when they decided to bust in the house because his brother might have waved a sledgehammer at a neighbour and she told them the brother was around the corner and she probably told them only his autistic brother was inside but they went in and tazered him between 5 and 12 times.
George is one tough Rainman, eh?

mauvelilac

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Re: TASER Testing:::by Cops...
« Reply #6 on: January 23, 2009, 03:05:17 PM »
That's just not right no matter which way you cut it. They (the police) should be severely reprimanded for this act against a defenseless person. No excuse in the world would be enough reason for their inhumane actions. This is about as low as anyone can get.

Edsonmom

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Re: TASER Testing:::by Cops...NEW UPDATE.. PLEASE READ
« Reply #7 on: February 13, 2009, 12:37:20 AM »
Tasers potentially lethal, RCMP head tells MPs


A revised RCMP policy that restricts how officers can use Tasers recognizes the stun guns can cause death, especially when fired on "acutely agitated" individuals, the head of the Mounties said Thursday
RCMP Commissioner William Elliott told a House of Commons public safety committee in Ottawa that the force introduced the policy on conductive energy weapons, or CEWs, to officers in June 2008.

"The RCMP's revised CEW policy underscores that there are risks associated with the deployment of the device and emphasizes that those risks include the risk of death, particularly for acutely agitated individuals," Elliott told the committee.

Under the amended policy, an officer is only permitted to use a stun gun if he or she is in physical danger or the public is in danger.

It means Mounties can no longer shock people who are simply "actively resistant" to officers' orders, the commissioner said.

"We've now made it very clear that the only time the use of a Taser can be justified is where there is a threat, either to our officers or members of the public," he told reporters after his appearance before the committee.

The RCMP has more than 1,100 Tasers in use by more than 3,000 officers. In the wake of several high-profile incidents involving Tasers, critics and the RCMP's civilian watchdog accused the Mounties of relying on the weapons too much in policing and firing them on people who pose no threat.

Arizona-based Taser International, which makes virtually all the stun guns currently being used by police forces, has said its products - which are intended to incapacitate people with an electric shock - have a higher safety margin than Tylenol.

Elliott told reporters Thursday that stun guns are a "serious use of force," but added he believes the weapons are "far, far less lethal and far, far less dangerous" than conventional firearms, based on the experience of his force, other police agencies and available scientific data.

"I do not think there is any evidence that Tasers kill but certainly we have had some incidents where shortly after a Taser was deployed individuals died," Elliott said, "and certainly there is a distinct possibility that the deployment of the Taser and the experience generally contributed to the individual's death."

The Mounties haven't spoken to the supplier about what the force's policy should be, he said.

In January, the Commission for Public Complaints Against the RCMP, a civilian oversight body, announced it would investigate every case in which a person died after being jolted by an RCMP Taser.

Paul Kennedy, the commission's head, said the probe would cover about 10 deaths, but the exact number of cases to be examined had yet to be determined because the commission lacked a precise count.

Elliott dismissed suggestions by members of the committee that the force had delayed informing politicians and the public about the new policy.

"I think that the media certainly has been advised on numerous occasions over the last several months with respect to the changes that we were adopting," he said.

He noted Parliament has been suspended twice since the policy was introduced, preventing him from briefing MPs on the changes.

"There was no committee for us to provide the update to," he said.

The old policy instructed police to follow the standard use-of-force framework, which outlines when certain approaches are warranted. In the past, RCMP officials have said the policy meant an officer could use his or her own discretion to decide when to deploy a Taser.

"I certainly think that there are incidents that, if they occurred today, a Taser will not be used, where if they occurred some months ago, a Taser would be used," Elliott said.

Elliott also said 60 RCMP stun guns have been tested since the CBC and Radio-Canada reported in December that an independent test of Tasers manufactured before 2005 found some of the devices produced a higher level of electricity than the manufacturer promises.

Of the 41 Tasers tested by a U.S. laboratory commissioned by the broadcasters, four delivered significantly more current than Taser International says is possible. In some cases, the current was as much as 50 per cent stronger than specified on the devices.

Elliott said the force's own independent tests have so far turned up no cause for concern, but he would keep MPs informed as testing continued.

In response to the CBC/Radio-Canada report, Taser International said the U.S. laboratory tests commissioned by the broadcasters are "flawed."

The Canadian Medical Association has raised concerns in the past about police departments relying on the manufacturer's claims of safety, and has called on police departments to open their databases to researchers.

RCMP officers are still required to report each stun gun firing or threat to fire, as well as to justify the use as a reasonable and necessary response to a threat to an officer or to public safety, he noted.

The force is committed to submitting quarterly and annual reports on Taser use incidents, the commissioner said.

The commissioner also said officers will now refresh stun gun training each year instead of every two years, but the RCMP did not adopt the all-party committee's call to reclassify the stun gun as an impact weapon.

Elliott said that's because it's already considered a prohibited firearm with clear policy restrictions for its use. He said the contentious weapons save lives.

"It's a dangerous world out there, and our officers are called upon to respond to situations involving threat with alarming regularity," he said.

Police use of Tasers has generated intense public concern after Polish immigrant Robert Dziekanski died at Vancouver International Airport more than a year ago. An RCMP officer shot him with a Taser shortly before his death.

British Columbia called an inquiry that has also been looking at the use of Tasers and the circumstances surrounding Dziekanski's death.

With files from the Canadian Press
http://news.sympatico.msn.cbc.ca/Home/ContentPosting?newsitemid=rcmp-stunguns&feedname=CBC-TOPSTOIRES-V3&show=False&number=0&showbyline=True&subtitle=&detect=&abc=abc&date=True

Adrian

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Re: TASER Testing:::by Cops...
« Reply #8 on: February 24, 2009, 11:09:48 AM »

Top Cops, and their defense of tazers: Not a good sign...

By THE CANADIAN PRESS
   

OTTAWA ? Canada?s two main police associations are defending the use of Tasers, saying they save lives.

The groups, representing police chiefs and rank-and-file officers, say the public has been subjected to ?inaccurate and incomplete? information on conducted energy weapons.

Charles Momy, president of the Canadian Police Association, says all police officers should be authorized to carry Tasers and to use them when their safety or public safety is at risk.

Momy says officers should receive regular training in the use of Tasers and governments should establish reporting and national testing standards.

The RCMP announced this month that it has changed its policy, acknowledging Tasers can kill and restricting their use to cases involving threats to officers or public safety.

The new rules clearly set out that Mounties can?t zap suspects for simple resistance or refusing to co-operate.

Adrian

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Re: TASER Testing:::by Cops...
« Reply #9 on: February 24, 2009, 11:24:22 AM »


Death By Taser:::

 By THE CANADIAN PRESS
   

VANCOUVER -- Robert Dziekanski took a "combative stance" with his fist clenched around a stapler, causing at least one RCMP officer to fear for his safety before the Polish man was stunned with a Taser at Vancouver's airport.

But Const. Gerry Rundel told a public inquiry into Dziekanski's death yesterday it was a less threatening motion - turning away from the officers and tossing his hands in the air - that justified using a Taser.

Rundel is the first of four officers to appear at the inquiry, relaying for the first time publicly officers' recollections of the final moments of Dziekanski's life.

He said he and the other officers were on a break at the airport RCMP detachment on Oct. 14, 2007, when they received a call over their radios about an intoxicated man throwing luggage around the international terminal.

They arrived within minutes, headed straight for Dziekanski and tried talking with him briefly, even though they were told by a witness that he didn't speak English.

Rundel said Dziekanski reached for his luggage, prompting the supervising officer, Cpl. Monty Robinson, to shout "No" and motion for Dziekanski to stop, which he did.

Dziekanski then turned around, lifted his hands in the air and started to walk away.

At some point after that, Dziekanski picked up a stapler and when he turned back toward the officers, Rundel said he was holding the stapler up by his chest with his other hand in a fist.

"Mr. Dziekanski went from non-compliant behaviour at the luggage to what training has taught us is a resistant behaviour where he has directly disregarded a command and fled from us ... and took up a combative stance," said Rundel.

"I recall fearing for my safety to a certain degree."

When Dziekanski took a step forward, Const. Kwesi Millington stunned him with the Taser, sending him thrashing about, screaming in pain.

When he didn't immediately fall, Millington was ordered by Robinson to shock him again. The Taser was deployed a total of five times.

Rundel, who made repeated references to his training, said Dziekanski's actions justified the use of the Taser before he picked up the stapler.

"He disobeyed a direction from Cpl. Robinson by flipping up his hands, turning around and leaving - that became resistant behaviour," said Rundel. "Once he turned away, walked away from us, according to my training, the authorization to use a Taser may be appropriate."

Rundel paused when asked repeatedly by Patrick McGowan, a commission lawyer, what command Dziekanski disobeyed that made officers conclude he was resistant.

McGowan noted Dziekanski stopped going toward his luggage when ordered to.

Rundel eventually replied Dziekanski "indirectly" disobeyed officers when he walked away because he should have known they were police and should have stood still.

Rundel was shown a video of the incident, taken by a witness, and asked to point out when Dziekanski lifted the stapler in an aggressive manner, but he could not.

"Are Dziekanski's hands not down?" asked retired judge Thomas Braidwood, who is overseeing the inquiry.

"My best recollection is that they're still in a combative stance, so I don't think you really can make that determination from this back view," replied Rundel.

Rundel said while they knew Dziekanski didn't speak English, officers didn't discuss it before engaging him. Nor did they talk to witnesses before confronting Dziekanski.

He didn't feel that language was an issue in the ultimately fatal encounter.

The Crown announced in December that none of the Mounties will face criminal charges. The Crown said that while the officers contributed to Dziekanski's death, their use of force was reasonable in the circumstances.


Edsonmom

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