Author Topic: Chloroform: Found in the Trunk, where Cayley...  (Read 1782 times)

Adrian

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Chloroform: Found in the Trunk, where Cayley...
« on: September 25, 2008, 02:28:05 PM »

I have been doing some reading, on Choroform. It was found in the trunk where Caylee, may have died. Traces of human decomposition were also found. We have been told it was left over pizza, making that incredible smell. Then it was road kill, or animals, then squirrels.

Ok, what if Casey was used to drugging her daughter, when she went partying. Left her sleeping in the trunk. Maybe, and all this is my speculations, it started with Xanax, as that was mentionned, then Mom, tried chloroform. From what I understand, too much, can cause nausea, vomiting- which in itself will produce phlem, blood, particles, of the inside of a person to be also ejected, onto the blanket, or the inside of the trunk..

Casey was then heard telling someone, the "squirrel", was dead, and may have had a nest(for dramatic affect), and more smell.It was sliding off the dumpster, and the vehicle.

Casey reminds me of a 14 year old teen, just breaking out, and doing some hard partying. Face it, kids, these days, do a hell of a lot more than smoke weed.But Casey was also smoking a lot more weed. Much of it is laced with chemicals to enhance the high, and lose control.Add alcohol, maybe pop a pill, and you got yourself a night of partying with not much re call if any.

Casey already said, if her parents wanted Caylee that bad they could have her, no problem. What made it a problem? Casey already said, she was un able to cope, and wanted to party. The parents, new this!!!! So what happened to Caylee???
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http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/toxprofiles/tp6.html



The chapter of most relevance is Chapter 2, "Health Effects".  I've
provided a link and some excerpts below, but to sum things up in
regards to your question:


--Drinking 100 ml of chloroform could indeed kill a person
--especially a small woman -- but there's no certainty of this.  Folks
have died from drinking doses as small as 10 ml, but have also
survived after drinking much larger amounts.


--Short of death, drinking that amount of chloroform would make a
person awfully sick, and would attack the liver, probably inducing a
case of toxic hepatitis:  weakness, jaundice, and possible long-term
liver damage. It can also induce a coma.


--Inhalation of chloroform is less likely to be deadly -- especially
if the person is breathing air at the same time -- but death can
occur.


--More likely effects of inhaling chloroform are dizziness, nausea,
disorientation, headache and possible drunken-like behavior.
Longer-term exposure can lead to hallucinations and psychotic
episodes.




Here are some of the more relevant excerpts from the Chapter I mentioned:


http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/toxprofiles/tp6-c2.pdf


Ingestion of chloroform:

Information regarding mortality in humans after oral exposure to
chloroform is limited. In one report, a man died of severe hepatic
injury 9 days after reportedly drinking .6 ounces of chloroform (3,755
mg/kg) (Piersol et al. 1933). He was admitted to a hospital in a deep
coma within 15 minutes of ingestion. This man was also noted to be a
long-time user of chloroform in his occupation and a heavy drinker,
suggesting that damage inflicted by previous use of chloroform and
alcohol over a long period of time may have been contributing factors
in his death. In contrast, a patient who ingested 4 ounces (.2,410
mg/kg) recovered from toxic hepatitis (Schroeder 1965). The recovery
may have been due to better therapeutic handling of the case. Fatal
doses have been reported to be as low as 10 mL (14.8 grams) or 212
mg/kg (Schroeder 1965).


Inhalation of chloroform:

Hepatic Effects. Chloroform-induced hepatotoxicity is one of the major
toxic effects observed in both humans and animals after inhalation
exposure. Increased sulfobromophthalein retention was observed in some
patients exposed to chloroform via anesthesia (exposure 8,000-10,000
ppm), indicating impaired liver function (Smith et al. 1973). Serum
transaminase, cholesterol, total bilirubin, and alkaline phosphatase
levels were not affected. Transient jaundice has also been reported in
one study (Whitaker and Jones 1965), while several earlier studies
report acute hepatic necrosis in women exposed to chloroform via
anesthesia (exact exposure not provided) during childbirth (Lunt 1953;
Royston 1924; Townsend 1939). The effects observed in the women
included jaundice, liver enlargement and tenderness, delirium, coma,
and death.



Neurological Effects The central nervous system is a major target for
chloroform toxicity in humans and in animals. Chloroform was once
widely used as an anesthetic during surgery in humans, but is not
currently used as a surgical inhalant anesthetic in modern-day medical
practice. Levels of 3,000-30,000 ppm were used to induce anesthesia
(Featherstone 1947; Smith et al. 1973; Whitaker and Jones 1965).
Concentrations of .40,000 ppm, if continued for several minutes, could
result in death (Featherstone 1947). To induce anesthesia, increasing
the concentration of chloroform gradually to 25,000 or 30,000 ppm
during the first 2 or 3 minutes with maintenance at much lower levels
was recommended. Concentrations <1,500 ppm are insufficient to induce
anesthesia; concentration of 1,500-2,000 ppm cause light anesthesia
(Goodman and Gilman 1980). Dizziness and vertigo were observed in
humans after exposure to 920 ppm chloroform for 3 minutes; headache
and slight intoxication were observed at higher concentrations
(Lehmann and Hasegawa 1910). Exhaustion was reported in 10 women
exposed to .22 ppm chloroform during intermediateand chronic-duration
occupational exposures (Challen et al. 1958). Chronic exposure to
chloroform concentrations .77 ppm caused exhaustion, lack of
concentration, depression, or irritability in 9 of 10 occupationally
exposed women. A case report of an individual addicted to chloroform
inhalation for .12 years reported psychotic episodes, hallucinations
and delusions, and convulsions




Chris

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Re: Chloroform: Found in the Trunk, where Cayley...
« Reply #1 on: September 26, 2008, 04:28:49 AM »
Yeah, it gets more strange all the time. Poor child, at least she deserves a proper funeral.