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Question:

Why are many people unwilling to provide tips to police that could solve a murder?

Author Topic: Edgar Millen, Killed, 1932, Mad Trapper I.D.  (Read 17023 times)

FRANZ01

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Edgar Millen, Killed, 1932, Mad Trapper I.D.
« on: December 03, 2007, 12:06:31 AM »
The Mad Trapper of Rat River was exhumed this summer with the hopes of finally identifying him after 75 years. Who was the man who led RCMP on the greatest manhunt in Canadian history? Who killed Edgar "Spike" Millen in a shootout?
A positive identification had been impossible until now. All the researchers and authorities had to work with before were his death photos, witness statements, and his aliases....Now they have DNA and anyone who thinks they may be related are offered free DNA kits on the Myth Merchant Films website....


Chris

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Re: Edgar Millen, Killed, 1932, Mad Trapper I.D.
« Reply #1 on: December 03, 2007, 01:32:48 AM »
I have read the book about this case. It is interesting that is for sure. It would not surprise me if he still does not get identified.

His survival skills were outstanding and he was very very tough. I'd suspect he left a place he did not wish them to know where he went.

I just feel bad for the Albert Johnson that people mistaken him for.

FRANZ01

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Re: Edgar Millen, Killed, 1932, Mad Trapper I.D.
« Reply #2 on: December 03, 2007, 01:29:47 PM »
Dick North's book? Everyone should read that book, not just for the amazing story of the Mad Trapper versus the RCMP but for Dick North's account of his years of investigation into the case....
Did you read Trackdown, Dick North's followup book? It presents his case for the Mad Trapper being American outlaw Johnny Johnson? By now Myth Merchant Films must have done the DNA test on the Trapper and Johnny Johnson's relatives. It must not have been a match since they're offering free DNA kits on their site....
You can read excerpts of Trackdown on Amazon Reader Online, including the last chapter on the blond gangster who shot Tribune reporter Jake Lingle in 1931. The Mad Trapper told two Natives in the Yukon that he was reading about himself in the newspaper a month later....Could the gangster theory be true?
I just feel bad for the Albert Johnson that people mistaken him for.
People have always called him Albert Johnson but the only alias we know that he used was Arthur Nelson....Albert Johnson was someone else who was expected in the area....But even researchers still think his name might be Johnson or Johnson is a family name. Not just Dick North. I think we need to get that name out of our heads. Think Nelson....

Chris

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Re: Edgar Millen, Killed, 1932, Mad Trapper I.D.
« Reply #3 on: December 03, 2007, 07:03:00 PM »
No I read Frank Andersons book. I'll check out that book to if it is at the library.

I'm not so sure about the gangster theory. This guy seemed to be more of a mental case. I think a gangster would be a gangster til death or prison. If anything, I was thinking a war vet. His training, skills and survival skills were world class. To be able to survive in the artic winter for that long and climb impossible to climb mountains and all, he'd have had to have been a very well trained person.

Chris

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Re: Edgar Millen, Killed, 1932, Mad Trapper I.D.
« Reply #4 on: December 03, 2007, 07:04:00 PM »
For those wondering what this is all about, here is the story from wikipedia:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albert_Johnson_(criminal)

Albert Johnson (alias, name unknown), known as the Mad Trapper of Rat River, was a fugitive whose actions eventually sparked off a huge manhunt in the Northwest Territories in Canada. The event became a minor media circus as Johnson eluded the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) team sent to take him into custody, which ended after a 150 mile (240 km) foot chase in a shootout in which Johnson was fatally wounded.

Details of Johnson's life before his arrival in Fort McPherson on July 9, 1931 are unknown. Soon after arriving he built a small 8x10 foot cabin on the banks of the Rat River, near the Mackenzie River delta. Johnson did not take out a trapping license, however, which was considered somewhat odd for someone living in the bush.

In December one of the local trappers complained to the local RCMP detachment in Aklavik someone was tampering with his traps, tripping them and hanging them on the trees. He identified Johnson as the likely culprit. On December 31 Constable Alfred King and Special Constable Joe Bernard, each of whom had considerable northern experience, trekked out to Johnson's cabin to ask him about the allegations. They noticed smoke coming from the chimney, and approached the hut to talk. Johnson refused to talk to them, seeming to not even notice them. King approached and looked in the window, at which point Johnson placed a sack over it. They eventually decided to return to Aklavik and get a search warrant.

They returned two days later with two additional RCMP officers and a civilian deputy. Johnson again refused to talk and eventually King decided to enforce the warrant and force the door. As soon as he started, Johnson shot him through the wood. A brief firefight broke out, and the team managed to return King to Aklavik, where he eventually recovered.

A posse was formed ? this time with nine men, 42 dogs and 20 pounds (9 kg) of dynamite which they intended to use to blast Johnson out of the cabin. After surrounding the cabin they thawed the dynamite inside their coats, eventually building a single charge and tossing it into the cabin. After the explosion collapsed the building, the men rushed in. Johnson opened fire from a foxhole he had dug under the building. No one was hit, and after a 15 hour standoff in the 40-below weather the posse again decided to return to Aklavik for further instructions.

By this point news of the events had filtered out to the rest of the world via radio. When the posse returned on January 14, delayed because of almost continual blizzards, Johnson had left the cabin and the posse gave chase. They eventually caught up to Johnson on January 30, surrounding him at the bottom of a cliff. In the ensuing firefight, Johnson shot Constable Millen through the heart. [1] The troops remained in position, and that night Johnson scaled the cliff to elude the RCMP once again.

The posse continued to grow, enlisting local Inuit and Gwich'in who were better able to move in the back country. Johnson eventually decided to leave for the Yukon, but the RCMP had blocked the only two passes over the local Richardson mountains. That didn't stop Johnson, who climbed a 7,000 foot peak and once again disappeared. This was only discovered when an Inuit trapper reported odd tracks on the far side of the mountains.

In desperation, the RCMP hired Wop May to help in the hunt by scouting the area from the air. He arrived in his new ski-equipped Bellanca monoplane on the 5th. On February 14 he discovered the trick Johnson had been using to elude his followers, when he noticed a set of footprints leading off the center of the Eagle River to the bank. Johnson had been following the caribou tracks in the middle of the river, where they walked in order to give them better visibility of approaching predators. Walking in their tracks hid his own footprints, and allowed him to travel quickly on the tramped-down snow without having to use his snowshoes. He only left the trail at night to make camp on the river bank, which is the track May had spotted. May radioed back his findings and the RCMP gave chase up the river, eventually being directed to Johnson by February 17.

The team rounded a bend in the river to find Johnson only a few hundred yards in front of them. Johnson attempted to run for the bank, but didn't have his snowshoes on and couldn't make it. A firefight broke out in which one RCMP officer was seriously wounded and Johnson was eventually killed after being shot nine times. May landed and flew the officer to help, being credited with saving his life.

Upon examination, over two thousand dollars in both American and Canadian currency was found in his pockets. As well as some gold, a pocket compass, a razor, a knife, fish hooks, nails, a dead squirrel, and a dead bird. During the entire chase the Mounties had never heard Johnson say a single word. To this day no one knows who he was, why he moved to the arctic, or what he was doing to the traps.

On 11 August 2007, a forensic team exhumed his body and conducted forensic tests on his remains before re-interning it. Forensic examination is now underway in an attempt to conclusively establish his true identity. Results of this testing will be released in conjunction with the documentary film being done for Discovery Channel by Myth Merchant Films

The event has been written about in a number of books, a song by Wilf Carter, as well as a fictionalized account that was later turned into the movie Death Hunt, starring Charles Bronson.

FRANZ01

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Re: Edgar Millen, Killed, 1932, Mad Trapper I.D.
« Reply #5 on: December 03, 2007, 08:44:51 PM »
Rambo of the Arctic
I too see him as Ramboesque, a backwoods guy with military experience, perhaps WW1, maybe one of the Bella Coola Norwegians who came from North Dakota in the 1890s....Sources say he first showed up in Northern B.C. in the Gold Rush of 1924....
I'm not so sure about the gangster theory.... I think a gangster would be a gangster til death or prison.
Not if he killed a reporter from a major paper like the Tribune....
Here's the description of the hitman: blond, about 6 feet, athletic, youthful looking like a college kid (Mad Trapper had a pug nose), able to shoot with the left hand....
I didn't believe it but I can't rule him out. Dick North ended his book with this suspect, eventhough the book was about Johnny Johnson as the Mad Trapper....
The RCMP also suspected he was a mobster because of his behavior--never talking and fighting to the end....

Chris

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Re: Edgar Millen, Killed, 1932, Mad Trapper I.D.
« Reply #6 on: December 04, 2007, 12:29:22 AM »
Quite a mystery that is for sure. He must have been one huge nut though. To go thru that much trouble over something so trivial, he really must have been disconnected from reality.

FRANZ01

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Re: Edgar Millen, Killed, 1932, Mad Trapper I.D.
« Reply #7 on: December 04, 2007, 07:31:09 PM »
I take it you don't think the Mad Trapper should be the symbol for the Vancouver Olympics in 2010!  :D

Here's an article on the unsolved Jake Lingle hit (note the name at the end):
http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qn4155/is_20010415/ai_n13903783

Chris

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Re: Edgar Millen, Killed, 1932, Mad Trapper I.D.
« Reply #8 on: December 05, 2007, 08:19:19 PM »
Interesting. Now that could be possible. That reporter may have ruined someone persons life and when he was freed he went and sought revenge. Would not surprise me if that happened.

Things were so out of control back then, If this guy was tied to anything mob related, I can see why he did not want the cops hassling him.

I think this story too also shows the bravery and skill of the RCMP in those days. I think it is harder to catch someone in 2007 who would run off in the middle of winter, in remote tough terrian then it was then.

FRANZ01

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Re: Edgar Millen, Killed, 1932, Mad Trapper I.D.
« Reply #9 on: December 07, 2007, 07:37:40 PM »
Eric Rudolph evaded capture in the North Carolina forest for 5 years. If he didn't have a weakness for Taco Bell, he never would have been caught....

Edgar Millen did talk to his killer at a trading post when he first showed up in the area. He questioned him informally about his intentions, mostly to find out if he was a risk to himself out in the bush. His answers were evasive. The Mad Trapper was lying right from the beginning.
Ever heard the suggestion that the Mad Trapper was the Northwest Territories Headhunter? I think the Headhunter was a myth and the killings started too early for it to be the Trapper and went on after his death....

Run Mad Trapper Run
« Last Edit: December 07, 2007, 07:47:49 PM by FRANZ01 »

Chris

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Re: Edgar Millen, Killed, 1932, Mad Trapper I.D.
« Reply #10 on: December 07, 2007, 08:33:47 PM »
Eric Rudolph evaded capture in the North Carolina forest for 5 years. If he didn't have a weakness for Taco Bell, he never would have been caught....

LOL! That's why I would not be good on the run, I would be at KFC and Arby's all the time.

No I never heard of the NWT headhunter. WHat is that?

FRANZ01

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Re: Edgar Millen, Killed, 1932, Mad Trapper I.D.
« Reply #11 on: December 09, 2007, 11:33:24 PM »
The legendary NWT Headhunter operated between 1905 and 1945 (I'll start a separate thread). This story has everything thrown in including the Mad Trapper but he would have been a baby in 1905 and dead by 1945. The only link would be the victims being gold hunters operating at some of the same sites as the Trapper, places such as Dease Lake, Yukon, which you would expect since the Trapper was always looking for gold and lost mines....The mysterious nature of the Trapper led to all sorts of speculation....No wierder than he's some guy from Chicago....although a lot of people from Chicago would go to the Yukon in the summertime....


mark

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Re: Edgar Millen, Killed, 1932, Mad Trapper I.D.
« Reply #12 on: January 05, 2008, 02:18:05 AM »
It may be a while to get DNA tests done. While unconfirmed, I'm convinced that a relative named Sigvald represents the most likely possibility to match up with Albert Johnson. I can't seem to find a way to get the tests done in an open verifiable way seeing as the film company wants a waiving of moral any many other rights to my own story. I've formally offered them 1000 dollars to take care of some costs along with first right to reveal results but to no avail. In response to an earlier post I consider the assumption that Albert Johnson was the same man as another reclusive  person calling himself Aurthur Nelson as possibly an errant lead. I've gone through the investigative documents and have not found anything substantive to support it. The "Mad Trapper" did call himself "Albert Johnson" by Millen's own report as documented in the book " What Became of Sigvald Anyway" I'm still unaware of a more likely theory.

mmc

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Re: Edgar Millen, Killed, 1932, Mad Trapper I.D.
« Reply #13 on: January 09, 2008, 05:43:11 PM »
I always been told that the knife that the mad trapper had on him was made from a trap spring . Does anyone know if this is true or not?

Chris

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Re: Edgar Millen, Killed, 1932, Mad Trapper I.D.
« Reply #14 on: January 10, 2008, 01:34:18 AM »
I have no idea, but I do have a book onder from the library about this case, I should be getting it in the next week or so.

 

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