Author Topic: Newborn snatched from Sudbury, Ont., hospital  (Read 2629 times)

CraftyGal

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Newborn snatched from Sudbury, Ont., hospital
« on: November 01, 2007, 05:44:18 PM »

Sudbury police released this hospital surveillance still video image of a woman they are seeking in connection to an amber alert for an abducted newborn, Thursday.

THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Greater Sudbury Police Service

Constable Bert Lapalme says they are looking for an aboriginal woman who is five-foot-six and between 26 and 30 years old.

Newborn snatched from Sudbury, Ont., hospital; suspect captured on video

November 1, 2007 - 4:10 pm

By: THE CANADIAN PRESS

SUDBURY, Ont. - Dozens of police officers in this northern Ontario city were on the hunt Thursday for a woman who was seen on a surveillance video apparently abducting a day-old baby girl from a local hospital.

Police issued an Amber Alert for the newborn shortly after she was reported missing from the St. Joseph's Health Centre site of Sudbury Regional Hospital at about 1 p.m.

An Amber Alert is issued when police believe a child has been abducted and may be in danger.

Sudbury police held a news conference Thursday afternoon and expressed concern about the woman's psychological state.

"There's no question, any time an infant is taken at that age, that the infant is in extreme danger," said police Chief Ian Davidson. "We implore her, if she's watching, or anyone else that has any information, to call 911 right away.

"The assumption is that she still is in possession of the infant. We're hoping she has not panicked and placed the baby somewhere that would make it difficult to locate the baby."

The girl's family is "extremely distraught and is under medical care," he said.

"We don't believe the suspect was known to the mother. There may have been some contact between the woman and the family."

An image from a hospital surveillance camera shows the unidentified woman carrying what appears to be a swaddled infant. The suspect was apparently wearing white hospital scrubs, and police say that points to a premeditated decision.

"We don't believe she's an employee there," said Const. Bert Lapalme. "The uniform was pretty much to go along with the plan, we suspect."

Police described the woman as aboriginal, five-foot-six, slim and between 26 and 30 years old.

She was wearing white pants, a white V-neck shirt and a black sweater, and had her black hair in a ponytail.

The Caucasian baby has dark hair, bruising on her face, was wearing a white flannel hospital gown, and was wrapped in a white blanket.

The woman is not related to the infant and it is not known why this particular baby was taken, Lapalme said.

The mother is believed to still be in the hospital, he said.

About 100 police officers were posted along highways leading out of Sudbury, and they were searching all vehicles for the suspect and infant.

"We have shut the highways down and are examining each vehicle and letting them go as expeditiously as possible," Davidson said.

"We are not sure if they left by bus, on foot, motor vehicle or in a taxi. ... We've stopped every bus in the city. We've contacted the fire department, the taxis. We're looking through our cameras in the downtown core as well."

Local transit services were delayed as police searched across the city for the suspect.

The hospital called police and stepped up security after the baby was reported missing.

"The police responded within 15 minutes," said Joe Pilon, senior vice-president of Sudbury Regional Hospital. "We conducted a search first internally and then on the grounds."

No one was allowed in or out of the facility until 3 p.m., when people with proper identification were permitted to leave.

The hospital was not admitting visitors Thursday night as police continued to interview staff members.

"We believe she was in the hospital for some period of time," Davidson said. "People had seen her walking around."

Chris

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Re: Newborn snatched from Sudbury, Ont., hospital
« Reply #1 on: November 01, 2007, 06:25:05 PM »
This is horrible! I hope they find her soon, Sudbury is a small city, I am sure someone will recognize her.

Chris

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Re: Newborn snatched from Sudbury, Ont., hospital
« Reply #2 on: November 01, 2007, 08:01:38 PM »

CraftyGal

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Re: Newborn snatched from Sudbury, Ont., hospital
« Reply #3 on: November 02, 2007, 01:55:20 AM »
thanks Chris

Chris

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Re: Newborn snatched from Sudbury, Ont., hospital
« Reply #4 on: November 02, 2007, 03:18:26 AM »
Don' you love it when there is a happy ending. It makes me happy for sure.


Sap1

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Re: Newborn snatched from Sudbury, Ont., hospital
« Reply #6 on: August 17, 2016, 06:31:24 PM »
the woman was jailed a portion of 30 months for the baby napping.

http://www.thesudburystar.com/2014/05/29/quebec-case-echoes-sudbury-baby-snatching

As sophisticated as the technological and other measures are at Health Sciences North to prevent infant abductions, there is no substitute for employee vigilance and parental alertness, says a hospital official.

The Sudbury hospital implemented measures based on best practices at other hospitals after a day-old baby girl was taken from what was then St. Joseph's Health Centre on Nov. 1, 2007.

The baby was kidnapped about 11 a.m. and recovered by Ontario Provincial Police about 8:30 p.m. that same day in Kirkland Lake. The parents and that child have never been identified.

A Quebec couple experienced that same horror when their baby was located three hours after she was abducted from a hospital maternity ward in Trois Rivieres.

The alleged abductor, dressed like a nurse, bundled up the day-old infant and took her out of the mother's room.

In the Sudbury abduction, Brenda Batisse was convicted of kidnapping the baby and sentenced to five years. That sentence was later reduced to 30 months, but she served only a small portion of that time. Batisse was paroled when it was determined she was unlikely to reoffend.

Lessard said Health Sciences North's pediatrics unit, its neonatal intensive care unit and its birthing centre are all locked to the outside and there are strict protocols for access.

All visitors to those units, including hospital staff, must be buzzed in. There are video cameras in all locations and "staff are diligent in monitoring the movement of people so we know who is on the unit at any given time," said Lessard.

He said he has been fielding a number of media calls since the Quebec kidnapping, most of them from that province, asking about the Sudbury abduction and the safety measures in place since that incident.

Following a series of similar infant abductions in the 1990s and 2000s, most Canadian hospitals instituted security measures and training workshops to prevent babies being taken from maternity wards.

Those measures are in place at Health Sciences North's Ramsey Lake Health Centre site, such as attaching security wrist bands on infants. The bands can only be removed by discharge nurses. If anyone else tries to remove the bands, said Lessard, alarms sound and the unit goes into lockdown.

All hospital employees wear identification badges with photographs and must identify themselves to patients. Lessard said patients are encouraged to ask to see those ID badges.

Regardless of what floor you may be on, don't be afraid to ask any hospital employee who comes into your room: "Who are you? Can I see your ID? What are you here to do?" said Lessard.

Part of employee training is to be constantly vigilant, constantly aware of your surroundings, so the birthing centre is probably the most secure unit at the hospital, said Lessard.

"It's a really good system that's worked really well for us," said Lessard.

carol.mulligan@sunmedia.ca