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Question:

Why are many people unwilling to provide tips to police that could solve a murder?

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71
Calgary / Re: Jessica Rae NEWMAN - 24 - Last Seen March 10, 2015 - Calgary, AB
« Last post by debbiec on April 20, 2015, 09:43:40 AM »
Police ramp up search for missing Calgary woman

Reid Southwick, Calgary Herald
More from Reid Southwick, Calgary Herald   
Published on: April 17, 2015
Last Updated: April 17, 2015 5:07 PM MDT


Police who are searching for a missing Calgary woman have taken the unusual step of issuing a statement directly to those who may be involved in the disappearance, warning them the case is “not going away.”

Jessica Rae Newman, a 24-year-old mother of three, was last seen when an ex-boyfriend dropped her off at her Forest Lawn home at about 9:30 p.m. March 10. She later vanished and did not appear in court the next day for a child custody hearing over her two-year-old.

In a letter to Newman’s mother, Rhonda Stewart, police asked that she share new information about the case with supporters and family, including that major crimes investigators have been assigned to the file.

The letter, posted on Facebook, moves to assure Newman’s family that police have “gathered a great deal of information” about the missing woman, her whereabouts before she vanished and “possible reasons for her disappearance.”

Later in the letter, police attempt to speak directly to anyone who is involved or has knowledge of Newman’s whereabouts.

“I want to personally extend this thought to you: ‘Jessica’s case is not going away’,” the letter states. “My best advice to you is to do what is right and contact police.”

Stewart said she was encouraged to see the forceful language in the police service’s public plea and hoped “whoever reads that feels guilty and decides to come clean.”

The mother said she is dumbfounded by her daughter’s disappearance. Newman was dropped off outside her home but never went inside. More than five weeks later, Stewart said she continues to hold out hope that her daughter will come home safe.

“She’s not somewhere of her own free will because she would have used her bank card or phoned people… She can’t go a day without texting,” Stewart said.

“There is something really strange and bad that’s happened.”

Sgt. John Hebert, of the Calgary Police Service’s missing persons team, said in an interview investigators remain hopeful that Newman is still alive, but that she has stopped using her cell phone, email and social media accounts.

“One of the possibilities is that she’s deceased,” Hebert said. “The other one is that she has decided to move on with her life and completely drop out of sight.”

Newman is described as Caucasian, five-foot-three, 100 pounds, with mid-length blond hair, blue eyes, and a tattoo the length of her spine. She was last seen wearing a black and white mid-length sleeveless dress and a black leather jacket with studs on the shoulder pads.

In a media briefing earlier this month, police said the case was still considered a missing persons investigation, but that they were not ruling out the potential for foul play.

rsouthwick@calgaryherald.com

http://calgaryherald.com/news/crime/police-ramp-up-search-for-missing-calgary-woman
72
Other Alberta Locations / Re: Lyle and Marie McCann part 2
« Last post by SAP on April 20, 2015, 12:47:03 AM »
And again ...    He could have responded to police via his monitoring bracelet but chose not to. Nothing but cat and mouse games.


http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton/accused-murderer-travis-vader-faces-new-charge-1.3036466

Travis Vader, the Alberta man charged with killing two missing seniors, is facing a new charge for allegedly breaking his curfew.

Camrose police Sgt. Rene Brisson said Vader was arrested Tuesday night, after the service tracking his electronic monitoring bracelet determined he was outside his residence after his 10 p.m. curfew.

The bracelet is connected to GPS and monitored by the Edmonton Police Service and a private company. When the workers noticed Vader's movements, they tried to communicate with him through the bracelet (described as a home alarm system with voice options). They notified Camrose police when Vader didn't respond.

Officers tracked the bracelet to the hospital in Camrose where Vader was arrested. He told police he had a medical emergency.

Vader was treated and released at that hospital after he was arrested. Police cannot say what his medical issue was. 

Brisson says there is an exception to the curfew for medical emergencies, but police feel that exception is irrelevant in this case.

Vader was charged Wednesday with failing to comply with a condition to be "indoors at his approved residence between 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. daily, except for medical emergencies." ​

He was released on his own recognizance — on $2,000 no-cash bail. Vader's court appearance for this single charge is in Camrose provincial court on April 29 at 9:30 a.m.

Vader has been in and out of jail since St. Albert seniors Lyle and Marie McCann disappeared in 2010, while travelling to B.C. Police found their burned-out motorhome near Edson, but never located the couple's remains.

In December, he was recharged with first-degree murder in the deaths of the McCanns.

He is scheduled to go to trial for that crime in March 2016.
73
Calgary / Re: Jessica Rae NEWMAN - 24 - Last Seen March 10, 2015 - Calgary, AB
« Last post by SAP on April 20, 2015, 12:41:48 AM »
Yes, family and friends have put up posters over a large area in Calgary.
74
Calgary / Re: Jessica Rae NEWMAN - 24 - Last Seen March 10, 2015 - Calgary, AB
« Last post by D1 on April 20, 2015, 12:37:01 AM »
Have big posters with Jessica's picture been put up all around where Jessica was last seen? If there are unknowing witnesses they need to be alerted to what has happened and found quickly. Just passing the word around the restaurant isn't good enough. Handouts at any near by intersections at the same time of day as she went missing..
Time and opportunity slip by quickly.. 
75
Calgary / Re: Jessica Rae NEWMAN - 24 - Last Seen March 10, 2015 - Calgary, AB
« Last post by eyeswideopen on April 20, 2015, 12:06:26 AM »
Hey Clouddown where did you go. wondering if there is any more updates to your knowledge?
76
General Discussion / FBI admits flaws in hair analysis over decades
« Last post by Concerned on April 19, 2015, 09:06:23 PM »
Quote
Of 28 examiners with the FBI Laboratory’s microscopic hair comparison unit, 26 overstated forensic matches in ways that favored prosecutors in more than 95 percent of the 268 trials reviewed so far, according to the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers (NACDL) and the Innocence Project, which are assisting the government with the country’s largest post-conviction review of questioned forensic evidence.

Quote
The FBI errors alone do not mean there was not other evidence of a convict’s guilt.

Quote
The FBI is waiting to complete all reviews to assess causes but has acknowledged that hair examiners until 2012 lacked written standards defining scientifically appropriate and erroneous ways to explain results in court. The bureau expects this year to complete similar standards for testimony and lab reports for 19 forensic disciplines.

Quote
Federal authorities launched the investigation in 2012 after The Washington Post reported that flawed forensic hairmatches might have led to the convictions of hundreds of potentially innocent people since at least the 1970s, typically for murder, rape and other violent crimes nationwide.

Cases involve:
- The FBI has identified for review roughly 2,500 cases in which the FBI Lab reported a hair match, 342 defendants' cases have been completed so far.
- The findings involve subjective, pattern-based forensic techniques - like hair and bit-mark comparisons – that have contributed to wrongful convictions in more than one-quarter of 329 DNA-exoneration cases since 1989.
- In 268 trials so far identified in which hair evidence was used against defendants, examiners gave flawed forensic testimony in 95%, or 257 cases. Of the 257 cases, 32 defendants sentenced to death, 14 of which have been executed or died in prison.


Source:  http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/crime/fbi-overstated-forensic-hair-matches-in-nearly-all-criminal-trials-for-decades/2015/04/18/39c8d8c6-e515-11e4-b510-962fcfabc310_story.html

To see state by state stats:  http://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/local/fbi-hair/
77
[quoteThe majority of people in a community naturally want to sweep any hint of an old unsolved murder under the rug.  Dr. Bowe's report will add more motivation to do so.  But it is Clayton's family who needs to decide if and when they are satisfied with the answers to ALL of their questions.  They have been jerked around for 25 years by the system.      ][/quote]  ... and such is the case for many individuals and family across the country.  Canada, as far as I'm concerned rates way up there when it comes to provincial/federal who knows who and control against the ordinary citizen.  If it takes the country's entire RCMP force to save one corrupt RCMP officer.... it shall be done.... same goes for unionized brotherhood of cops!
78
Windsor / Re: Ljubica Topic, 6 UNSOLVED MURDER May 14, 1971 (Windsor, ON)
« Last post by debbiec on April 19, 2015, 06:36:54 PM »
Police sketch of suspected murderer of Ljubica Topic, May 25, 1971
79
Windsor / Re: Ljubica Topic, 6 UNSOLVED MURDER May 14, 1971 (Windsor, ON)
« Last post by Sunshine31 on April 19, 2015, 05:37:59 PM »
http://blogs.windsorstar.com/news/four-decades-later-a-broken-tooth-could-help-solve-six-year-old-girls-murder

Four decades later, a broken tooth could help solve six-year-old girl’s murder
 Paula Topic knows her time to see justice, to find peace, is quickly running out.

But 44 years after the savage sexual assault, beating and murder of her six-year-old daughter Ljubica, both Topic and Windsor police are hoping a man’s broken tooth could be the key to solving the perplexing cold case.

“When I go to sleep, in my head I heard her voice. She’s calling me. But then I open my eyes, she’s not there,” said Topic, 79, who hasn’t publicly talked about the case in 44 years.

“Every time I see her picture I think about her. Her picture is right there in the dining room. Every time I pass, I see her and I say, ‘Honey, I miss you.’”


Ljubica Topic was murdered in Windsor, Ont., May 14, 1971 and her killer has never been found. Twenty-eight years later new DNA evidence may lead police to the slain six-year-old’s assailant.
AdvertisementA man snatched Ljubica in May 1971 as she played outside her Drouillard Road home. Police found her body – covered in blood with her teeth smashed and leg broken – early the next morning. She had been sexually assaulted.

For the first time since the murder, police have revealed they found a man’s broken front tooth near Ljubic’s body. They think it could be the killer’s, and they want to hear from anyone who remembers a man who suddenly lost a tooth around that time.

Const. Scott Chapman, who started working on the cold case in October, called it one of the most horrific in Windsor history.

“She was absolutely brutally, violently attacked,” he said. “Particularly considering she was a six-year-old, there was a tremendous amount of force used on her. It’s difficult to look at someone as innocent as a six-year-old child and see what happened to her.”

After seeing the case reopened six times, Topic hopes police can finally bring her the peace that has eluded her for 44 years.

“I pray to God that maybe, maybe this time,” she said. “I hope before I die I find out. I don’t have much to live. I know somebody knows.”

She spends most days sitting alone in her modest, neatly kept Howard Avenue home, thinking about Ljubica and hoping the killer has been as tortured as her.

“If you kill a little girl, that’s all the time in your heart,” said Topic. “You never forget that. Forty-four years, I never forget it. When I see her picture I just cry. I remember like yesterday what happened. That’s all the time in my head.”

It was May 14, 1971, about five years after the family moved to Windsor from Yugoslavia.


Rear view of victim’s home where she was playing before she was slayed, on may 15, 1971. (Windsor Star files)
Topic’s husband Luka was working afternoons. The children were playing outside as the sun’s soft glow sank below the horizon. Topic remembers about 10 kids, including Ljubica and her eight-year-old brother Michael, playing in a parking lot near her house at 1290 Drouillard Road.

Ljubica, excited and out of breath from her frolicking in the twilight, raced into the house.

“She come inside around eight o’clock and say ‘Can I take a candy?’ and I say sure,” said Topic. “I said don’t stay out too long.”

Ljubica took the candy and ran back outside.

“The last time I see her.”

A short while later, Topic called her children inside. Michael was there, but Ljubica was gone.

“I say where is she?”

A man had approached the kids from a restaurant across the street. Ljubica was lured away, walking hand-in-hand with her killer, with the promise of $8 for help with a job. The man gave Michael a dime to ride his bike in the other direction. He last saw his sister between 8:30 p.m. and 9 p.m.

Topic searched all the way to Seminole Street. There was no trace of Ljubica or the man who took her.

“I see a police car and stopped him,” she said. “I said somebody took my little girl.”

Within minutes, citizens and officers were swarming the area in one of the biggest police hunts in Windsor history.

But while they were busy scouring streets, yards and back alleys, Ljubica was probably already dead. Police have previously said she was likely attacked and killed or left to die an hour after she disappeared.

Around 1 a.m. on May 15, an officer scanning yards with a flashlight found her behind the home at 1690 Hickory Road. The killer left Ljubica’s battered body near a garage, not far from the gate to the back alley.

Her face was covered in blood. The beating she took was so vicious that her right leg was broken and her teeth were busted. Police found two of them in the dirt near her body.

About four hours after Ljubica disappeared, the police chief arrived at her parents’ home.

“He said they found her,” said Topic. “I say can I see her? And he say ‘I’m sorry, she’s dead.’ The little girl, she’s so innocent.”


Police sketch of suspected murderer of Ljubica Topic, May 25, 1971.
Police released a sketch based on a description from Michael, who remembered the killer as a thin-faced man with a slender build, blond hair and perhaps close to six feet tall. Michael’s description, if accurate, put the predator in his teens or early 20s.

The sketch turned up no clues.

In the years since Ljubica’s death, police have questioned several hundred people, chasing down tips and leads from across Canada and the U.S. They’ve all been dead ends.

The case has been cold more than four decades, but police haven’t given up. They still keep piles of possible evidence, including Ljubica’s tiny scuffed brown shoes, soil samples and the little girl’s teeth.

Chapman said there is also “additional evidence” that has helped police create a DNA profile, but he refused to reveal what it is. That profile was tested against a national data bank, to compare it with the DNA of convicted offenders and crime scene profiles with unidentified perpetrators.

“To this day, we don’t have a link to any of them,” he said.

But Chapman is hoping a newly released piece of evidence will change that.

For the first time ever, police have publicly said they found an adult male’s front incisor tooth in the area where Ljubica’s body was found. Investigators said it appears the tooth was snapped off at the gum line.

“We believe it’s linked to the suspect,” said Chapman.


Det. Scott Chapman discusses the 44-year-old unsolved murder of Ljubica Topic on April 17, 2015. (TYLER BROWNBRIDGE/The Windsor Star)
He wouldn’t confirm if police believe the killer lost his tooth during a struggle with the young girl.

“What we’re looking for now is for people to try to dial back their memories the best they can and see if anything sticks out about somebody who was suddenly missing a tooth at the time or shortly after the murder,” he said.

He said previous investigators likely didn’t tell the public about the tooth because they were keeping it as “hold back evidence.”

“You have hundreds of tips coming in and you want to filter through them and try to compare them with what you have to figure out what the most valid tips are to pursue,” he said.

But given the age of the case, police decided it now makes sense to reveal the detail in hopes of jogging someone’s memory, before potential witnesses are lost.

“We need to take every step we can to resolve it for the family, for the city, for everybody who has ever worked on this case,” he said.

For Topic, who feels she’s reaching the end of her own life, finding out who murdered her daughter is the only thing that matters.

“I just pray they find the killer, then if I die tomorrow, I’ll be happy.”

twilhelm@windsorstar.com or Twitter WinStarWilhelm

 
Andre Chiasson places flowers at the grave of Ljubica Topic on may 14, 1996, at Memorial Gardens, the 25th anniversary of the unsolved murder of the girl. Chiasson was a classmate of the youngster and periodically visits her memorial. (Windsor Star File Photo) 
A photo of murder victim Ljubica Topic is seen at police headquarters in Windsor on Friday, April 17, 2015. Police have released the fact that a tooth was found at the scene of the murder in hopes someone will come forward with new information in the 44 year old case. (TYLER BROWNBRIDGE/The Windsor Star) 
Paula Topic holds a portrait of her daughter Ljubica Topic, who was murdered, at her home in Windsor on Friday, April 17, 2015. Police have released the fact that a tooth was found at the scene of the murder in hopes someone will come forward with new information in the 44 year old case. (TYLER BROWNBRIDGE/The Windsor Star) 
Windsor detectives comb the scene for clues to the murder of Ljubica Topic in this May 14, 1971 file photo. The investigation into the six-year-old’s death has been reopened because of DNA evidence. (Windsor Star files) 
This is the alley behind the backyard on Hickory Road where the battered body of victim Ljubica Topic was found early this morning. May 15, 1971. (Windsor Star files) 
An estimated 150 volunteers joined in the search for a six-year-old girl reported missing Friday night. In the foreground of this team are Jack Northwood, left, president of SPECS -Sun Parlour Emergency Citizens Service, and Murray Topliffe, president of REACT – Radio Emergency Assistance Citizens Team. Looking on in background are Steve Langlois, 11, and Teddy Reaume, 16, both of 1371 Albert Rd. (Windsor Star files) 
Rear view of victim’s home where she was playing before she was slayed, on may 15, 1971. (Windsor Star files) 
Paula Topic holds a portrait of her daughter Ljubica Topic, who was murdered, at her home in Windsor on Friday, April 17, 2015. Police have released the fact that a tooth was found at the scene of the murder in hopes someone will come forward with new information in the 44 year old case. (TYLER BROWNBRIDGE/The Windsor Star) 
Eight-year-old Svetko Topic shows his mother the dime that the sex-slayer of his sister gave him to go play on his bicycle. Police discovered the badly beaten body of six-year-old Ljubica Topic early this morning. (Windsor Star files) Find Windsor Star on Facebook
 Tags: cold case, ljubica topic, murder, Paula Topic, Scott Chapman, sexual assault, Videos, Windsor
 
80
I am sure many questions will be addressed by the Miller's.  I have a few:

-What happened to the report of undisclosed information from an officer of the CBPD?

-Why didn't SIRT interview everyone on the Miller's list?

-What issues weren't addressed by Dr. Bowes?

-Can Kate Dwyer make a case that Clayton's bruising was not liver mortis or bascially post-death pooling of blood from being in a prone position?

I hope that Tuesday's meeting will be meaningful.  Since Dr. Bowes has discredited key components of Kate's work, it might be an uphill battle.  Unfortunately, as Maureen has noted, the medical jargon is difficult to understand for us lay people. 

The majority of people in a community naturally want to sweep any hint of an old unsolved murder under the rug.  Dr. Bowe's report will add more motivation to do so.  But it is Clayton's family who needs to decide if and when they are satisfied with the answers to ALL of their questions.  They have been jerked around for 25 years by the system.     
       

 




 
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A garden of tears: the murder of Kathryn-Mary Herbert

A casefile of events and story related to the 1975 murder of Kathryn Mary Herbert (Sutton).

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