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71
Other BC Locations / Re: Jordan Holling-18- Missing- Oct.16 2017, Campbell River BC
« Last post by Long Gone on January 02, 2018, 11:36:40 AM »
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/when-people-go-missing-bc-families-1.4468993

Where could they be? The struggle to cope when people go missing
'Nobody tells you how to deal with something like this. You never think it's going to happen to you'
By Chad Pawson, CBC News Posted: Jan 01, 2018

The New Year's resolution for many families and friends of missing persons is simply that: resolution.

"It's terrible to think that we may never know," said Diane Caldwell-Demmon, whose son Luther Demmon, 25, was last seen in Vancouver on Oct. 22.

"It's very surreal. It's like we're in limbo. You don't know what to do. You can't fix it, you can't solve it, there's no closure, there's no resolution."

Thousands of people are reported missing to police across British Columbia every year. In 2017, the Vancouver Police Department received more than 5,000 reports ? an average year.

The good news is that most cases get solved. But there are always some that don't ? leaving families feeling desperate, holding out hope that their loved one will return or at least be found, so there can be closure.
Cst. Karen Cedik is an investigator with Surrey RCMP's Missing Persons Unit, which handled 2,800 reports in 2017.

Cedik says a part of her job is keeping hope alive for families.

"[To] reassure them that you know we're going to take every investigative step to try and locate their loved one," she said.

Families turn to police when they can't find their relative on their own.

Cedik says police have multiple resources at their disposal to look for missing people, including improved access to databases and help from search and rescue groups.


As for the VPD, it says it usually has up to 30 active investigations occurring at the same time. And Cedik says help from the families themselves is also valuable.

"The family knows the missing person on a more intimate level," she said. "They can do patrols as well if they want, and sometimes they do end up finding the person."

Social media has also become an important resource for families, as it allows searchers to widely disseminate information around the world if needed.

Like Luther Demmon's family, the family of Jordan Holling has created an extensive post on Facebook to try and help locate him.

The 17-year-old went missing in Campbell River on Oct. 16 when he was on his way home from a friend's house.

The Facebook post reads like a manual of what is known about his disappearance and how people can help look for him.

'There's no handbook'

Holling's mother, Andrea Holling, says it was a daunting task to learn what to do to try and find her son, but she's thankful for the support she has received from people in the community.

"There's people that I don't even know behind the scenes that are helping out with stuff," she said.

Despite sophisticated social media sites in place, posters on streets, police involvement, and sometimes private investigators, the families still have to deal with the most difficult part: coping.

And it gets even harder as time adds up.

"We don't know anything more than we did the day he left," said Caldwell-Demmon about her son, Luther. "It's just a huge hole, it's a huge hole in our family."
Both families admit that Christmas was a very difficult time to get through as both missing men have siblings who are also struggling to understand what happened.

Andrea Holling copes by praying and going to church. Caldwell-Demmon does her best to talk about it with her network. Both aren't willing to give up.

"To do nothing is worse than to try and do something," said Caldwell-Demmon.

They also agree that, at times, the uncertainty is unbearable, with hundreds of scenarios going through their minds as they think about where their sons are.

"You don't know how to cope because there's no handbook," said Holling. "Nobody tells you how to deal with something like this. You never think it's going to happen to you."

Luther Demmon, left, was last seen in Vancouver on Oct. 22, 2017, while Jordan Holling went missing on his way home from a friend's house in Campbell River on Oct. 16, 2017. (Missing Person Luther Demmon-Facebook/Missing: Jordan Alexander Holling -Facebook)

72
Toronto / Re: Gracelyn Greenidge | 41 | Toronto | Unsolved | July 29, 1997
« Last post by Long Gone on January 02, 2018, 11:17:23 AM »
http://torontosun.com/news/local-news/violent-struggle-50gs-reward-offered-in-1997-toronto-murder-of-nursing-assistant


'VIOLENT STRUGGLE': $50Gs reward offered in 1997 Toronto murder of nursing assistant
Kevin Connor Published:
January 2, 2018

TORONTO ? Toronto Police are offering a reward of up to $50,000 for help solving the brutal murder of a nursing assistant 20 years ago.

Gracelyn Greenidge, 41, was found dead from blunt force trauma on July 29, 1997 at her 50 Driftwood Ave. apartment, in the Jane St. and Finch Ave. area, where she lived alone.

She was last seen leaving work at a Christie St. seniors home the day before, and when she didn?t show up for work the next day, co-workers became concerned. One went to look for Greenidge at her apartment.

Cold case homicide Det.-Sgt. Stacey Gallant said Greenidge could be seen dead through the mail slot in the door.

?There had been a violent struggle,? he said, adding the woman died from blunt force trauma.

Police collected DNA evidence at the scene and a profile was developed, but no match was found in the national DNA databank and men the victim knew were ruled out.

?We have the killer?s DNA, now we just need a name to go with the DNA and nothing more,? Gallant said.

?Anyone who knew Gracelyn who didn?t speak to police during the original investigation is asked to contact cold case immediately. You may have the key to this case and not realize it.?

The up to $50,000 reward is for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the killer.

?She led an exemplary life?
?It has been 20 years since this murder occurred. It?s time to step up and help solve this case,? Gallant said.

Police released a video appeal in the cold case in an attempt to reach out to family members of Greenidge.

?We believe she was from the Barbados and this is an avenue to reach out to family (as well as the public) for help,? Gallant said.

?(Greenidge) was a registered nurse assistant and she wanted to be and RN ? she led an exemplary life,? he added.

Anyone with information is asked to call 416-808-7400 or Crime Stoppers at 416-222-TIPS (8477).
73



And, I would think that the belts would yield very important clues.  Prints only of hubby in strategic places on the belts? Might point towards possibly hubby, and M/S might apply?
[/quote]

Yes JB , The Belts would yield some Interesting Facts...If it was Murder/Suicide...and possibly indicate it was in Fact NOT...  Le would have that info by now....High Profile Case Like this ,Le will be reluctant to release anything to the media.  The Family will be putting pressure on Le and will use the media to do so....
74
Depends now on what forensics Le have recovered. Hopefully they have plenty of surveillance video from neighboring homes to scrutinize , narrowing down who should have been in the area and who may be person(s) of interest... Business records may give insight and leads but not a smoking gun. The family will want to help le any way they can .. Seeing as the man they hired to conduct a  parallel investigation is apparently in good with Le it lends a much better opening to the sharing of leads and info..

Bolding is mine/jb
Makes perfect sense LG,  and hopefully le will be able to solve this mystery. 
And, I would think that the belts would yield very important clues.  Prints only of hubby in strategic places on the belts? Might point towards possibly hubby, and M/S might apply?
75
Depends now on what forensics Le have recovered. Hopefully they have plenty of surveillance video from neighboring homes to scrutinize , narrowing down who should have been in the area and who may be person(s) of interest... Business records may give insight and leads but not a smoking gun. The family will want to help le any way they can .. Seeing as the man they hired to conduct a  parallel investigation is apparently in good with Le it lends a much better opening to the sharing of leads and info..
76
If this is outside the Norm, there may be others who do not feel secure.

It is best that the family have their own investigator, as they would feel more comfortable with him.
in my opinion.


jb
77
With so many deals and potential scenarios... hmmm.  Gonna be a tough nut to crack.  One would consider in that particular neighborhood that video surveillance would be rampant.  That would be an obvious avenue that LE have taken .  To solve this by going over financials and deals would be a zig zag through and around the mulberry bushes exercise in futility.  The private firm hired will not get full disclosure from Le , that is a certainty.
78
Quote
Shades of Wong and Fendelat, imo. Very sad for family it has come to murder of their loved ones.

I think you are right. And Wong and Fendelat murder is still unsolved.


jb

79
Toronto / Re: Barry (Apotex founder) and Honey Sherman found dead in their Toronto home
« Last post by Sap1 on December 31, 2017, 06:13:31 PM »
The house they were presently living in was placed solely into Honey's name not long ago. The couple was found murdered in the pool area very near where Honey's office was in the house, although there have been comments made per media that one of them may have been murdered elsewhere in the house.

After reading over a lot of material, ie: lawsuits, sneaky loopholes in family businesses ... price paid and price sold for, etc ... this all sounds like a Robin Hood scene with a modern day twist. Offshore tax free accounts as well, probably.

Shades of Wong and Fendelat, imo. Very sad for family it has come to murder of their loved ones.
80
That is how people get sucked in.  Sellers see a rich couple coming, and know they are worth billions - and only to discover that the type of sale is not what they had anticipated. Even offered at a bargain - it would still have to be dickered downwards.

jb
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