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Not sure if folks have commented on this before or not, but; MY WORD! Margaret McWilliam (murdered in 1987 in TO -- her case was dubbed "the Cinderella murder") looks very like a young Sonia Varaschin in her photos. Do others see this? Coincidence - or?  I have just been reading up on Margaret's case following dotr's post on Sonia's thread on another site. While I understand LE in MMW's case believe her murder was not targeted (more a crime of opportunity) and in Sonia's that she was known to her killer and targeted specifically, I wonder if Sonia could have reminded him of the earlier, random crime? It is another small connection that they were both murdered at the end of August (1987/2010).
Dotr presented another possible connection in asking if someone is targeting health care workers (Sonia worked as a nurse, Margaret in a senior's home -- and Gracelyn Greenidge as a nursing assistant). Do others see a strong physical resemblance between the first two?
Since there is, apparently, DNA from both murders I assume a link has been ruled out (or we would have learned of a connection?) But to me the resemblance seems UNCANNY.....
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Not sure if folks have commented on this before or not, but; MY WORD! Margaret McWilliam looks very like a young Sonia Varaschin in her photos. Do others see this? Coincidence - or?  I have just been reading up on Margaret's case following dotr's post on Sonia's thread. While I understand LE in this case believe Margaret's murder was not targeted (more a crime of opportunity) and in Sonia's that she was known to her killer and targeted specifically, I wonder if Sonia could have reminded him of the earlier, random crime? It is another small connection that they were both murdered at the end of August (1987/2010).
Dotr, you presented another possible connection in asking if someone is targeting health care workers (as you point out, Sonia worked as a nurse, Margaret in a senior's home -- and Gracelyn Greenidge as a nursing assistant). Do others see a strong physical resemblance between the first two?
Since there is, apparently, DNA from both murders I assume a link has been ruled out (or we would have learned of a connection?) But to me the resemblance seems uncanny!
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Edmonton / Re: Anina Hundsdoerfer - young scientist missing-March 22, 2014
« Last post by Sap1 on July 16, 2018, 11:31:23 AM »
https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/alberta/staring-back-john-de-ruiter-alberta-spiritual-leader/article37071277/

Snipped.

There was a cup of coffee on her desk, growing cold. There was her wallet and her cell phone, her purse and her winter coat, a framed picture of John. The face she had stared at for countless hours, light hair and clear blue eyes, a gaze that felt as though it could unlock the universe itself.

Anina had moved across the world to be close to John de Ruiter.
Four times a week, she and hundreds of others filled the long rows of chairs at The Oasis Centre in west Edmonton, staring silently at him for hours as he sat beatifically under a beam of light, staring back.

He was their guru and teacher, to some even a saviour, a humble messiah they called simply "John." They left their lives and families to be with him, devoted themselves completely to him and his teachings.


He arranged their marriages and relationships, their jobs and homes, gave them counsel and made their decisions, their lives winding ever more tightly around him while he drew from them their time and their labour, their money and their love.

They were Johnites or Oasis, sometimes The College, or just "the group."

Anina's mother and sisters struggled to understand. Like others on the outside, they thought it was a cult or a sect and they wondered about de Ruiter's motives and his power. They'd seen his followers sitting rapt and silent while he spoke what, to Anina's family, sounded like gibberish.

They saw how Anina had changed. How when she talked about him, she adopted his mannerisms and tone, her face becoming distant and her voice sleepy and soft, almost like an entirely different person than the one they had known.


Anina was one of hundreds of followers who sat silently with John de Ruiter, staring at him in the hope that he would stare back.

They weren't the only ones with questions. There had been allegations de Ruiter had sex with married female followers, stories about the break-up with his first wife and his relationship with two beautiful blonde sisters, who later filed court documents saying he was nothing more than a manipulator and a fraud.

Some former followers believed they'd been brainwashed or hypnotized while in the group, targeted with disturbing "psychic violence" when they left.

But though Anina's family worried, John seemed to help her and give her balance, and they didn't want to lose her altogether. If forced to choose, they knew, she would choose him.

Despite her devotion, Anina didn't always understand the things John did, the things he called on her and others to do. In the winter of 2014 she found herself increasingly confused and questioning, even as she tried to push those feelings aside. She knew doubting, even in oneself, showed a lack of faith. In true belief, there were no questions.

"Part of me wonders why John entrusted such teaching to me when it is likely to have me spinning," she'd written in her diary, a few weeks earlier.

"But I am able to not spin. I am able to be clear. He said I am really learning. Don't mix levels. With John you will never have less difficulty. He will always give you more."

It was Saturday, March 22, 2014. There was an event that night that Anina had marked in her calendar as "Party with John." But she offered her ticket for sale on the group's private message board instead.

Then she left her cup of coffee and her wallet, her cell phone and her winter coat, her framed picture of John de Ruiter with his eyes as vast and blue as heaven, and headed into the darkness of a cold Edmonton night.
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https://globalnews.ca/news/3205149/former-edmonton-police-chiefs-son-mark-lindsay-files-appeal-after-murder-conviction/

Snipped.
RED DEER, Alta. – The son of a former Edmonton police chief found guilty of killing his ex-girlfriend and dumping her body at a location north of Calgary is launching an appeal.


Mark Lindsay, who is 29, was found guilty last May of second-degree murder and obstruction of justice in the death of Dana Turner. He was sentenced to life in prison with no chance of parole for 16 years.

The Court of Appeal confirmed a notice of appeal was filed Nov. 25, 2016.

The defence argued during a three-week, judge-alone trial in Red Deer that the accused should not be held criminally responsible due to schizophrenia.

The argument was rejected and Lindsay was sentenced last fall to 16 years in prison before he’s eligible for parole.

READ MORE: Psychologist says accused Edmonton killer Mark Lindsay developed abnormally as a child
See link for above psychology comment.
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London / Re: Irene Francis Gibbons - Strathroy, ON - Murdered - 1975
« Last post by George Fayne on July 15, 2018, 01:38:01 PM »
If you go a "Google Maps" search of the address listed in the article that I had posted in my previous entry, you might notice a couple of things (I'm not directly posting the address out of respect for the current home owner's privacy).  Firstly, that Irene's house is right in the centre of a "T" intersection and is extremely visible.  Secondly, the houses in this neighbourhood are very close together.  The yards are tiny.

The intersection detail is very striking to me.  Irene's house would have been fairly visible to a passer-by.  I read somewhere that houses situated at intersections are often targeted by intruders because of their visibility, and because it's easier for a passing car or bicyclist to linger at an intersection without notice.  The openness of this area suggests to me that the location is a prime factor in this case.  In other words, my gut is telling me that Irene was not murdered by someone that she knew through previous encounters, rather she was targeted by someone who was creeping the neighbourhood. 

I'm not certain what to say about the close proximity of the houses.  Perhaps the killer knew of some pathway that would enable an easy escape?
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London / Re: Jacqueline Dunleavy, 16, - London, ON - Murdered - 1968
« Last post by George Fayne on July 15, 2018, 01:25:50 PM »
Has anyone ever considered any connection between Jacqueline Dunleavy and Lynne Harper?  I ask this because Jacqueline was apparently discovered lying on her back "in a ceremonious mortuary position" (Murder City 104).  Though the murder seemed to happen quickly, the killer took the time to pose her and to scatter her shoes, boots, bag, torn pantyhose, underwear around her body.  Furthermore, he left her exposed, her blouse torn and her skirt lifted (Murder City 104).  Also, she was garroted by her scarf.  I'm just considering this against Julian Sher's description of Lynne Harper in his book about Truscott.  I'll copy what I wrote on the Harper thread:

Quote
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Re: Lynne Harper - 1959 - Murdered - Clinton
« Reply #22 on: June 03, 2018, 01:55:10 PM »
It seems that folks are so fixated on the whole Steven Truscott business that many details pertinent to the Lynne Harper case have been forgotten.  Her death was clearly part of a larger series of necrophiliac killings that seemed strangely common in Southwestern Ontario at this time.  She went missing on the evening of June 9th, 1959 and was discovered on the afternoon of June 11th, 1959.

To summarize some of the physical evidence*:

She was discovered lying on her back, her right leg slightly turned, bent at the knee.  Her left leg was straight.  Her left arm lay across her chest, her right arm was bent at the elbow, her palm turned up near her head.
She only wore an undershirt, which was pulled up.
An assessment of her stomach contents initially placed her time of death at approximately midnight on June 10th.  This evidence is, of course, fairly contentious.
Wounds on her left leg, mud on her right foot suggest that she was dragged into the forest, over a barbed wire fence.  Her left shoulder was also wounded and a small amount of blood was discovered on the ground beneath it.  There was some blood on her underwear and shorts
Her shoes and socks had been removed
Her blouse was used as a garotte.
A button from her blouse was discovered by her left shoulder.
Her body may have been left on its left side for about an hour after death (this point also seems contentious).
Her locket was discovered, unclasped, hanging off of a barbed wire on the west edge of Lawson's bush.  It was discovered on June 19th.
A large piece of her blouse had been cut out and removed (nine by ten inches).
Footprints were found by her body.
Her clothing had been carefully removed and placed:  her shorts were discovered close to her elbow, her socks and hairband fifteen inches close to her head, her underwear was about 30 feet away from the body.  Her clothing was arranged in a neat manner.  Her shorts and underwear were not torn.
In the field nearby (about 70 feet away) police discovered a comb, two coke bottles, kleenex, and a half eaten hot dog.
The leaves and dirt around her body were undisturbed.
Three branches lay across her body; two were crossed over her chest in a V formation that framed her face.

My sources are:  Until You are Dead by Julian Sher, this document explaining the Ontario Court of Appeal's decision to exonerate Truscott, as well as this document detailing Truscott's 1967 appeal attempt (attached).

*which was notoriously mucked up in the Truscott investigation.  This, of course, confuses things.
   

I didn't write it in the Harper thread, but Sher notes that Lynne Harper's body seemed to be posed in a "funereal" way.

The other striking detail is this:  what's always bothered me about the Harper case is the fact that the killer apparently picked up Harper on the highway and then returned her body to Lawson's bush.  Why not place her body further from the pick up site?  Most killers do this.  This detail did not bode well for Truscott, especially given the fact that Harper was placed in a location that was frequently used as a biking trail for local youth--thus the whole "bicycle tire track" detail that seemed to gesture towards Truscott.  Barring Truscott (who I believe is innocent) the only answer I can think of is this:  the killer "got off" (sorry for the crude wording) on Lynne Harper being discovered.  The same may be said for Jacqueline Dunleavy.  As in the case of Harper, Dunleavy was discovered outside in a somewhat public area.  Arntfield writes:

Quote
The chosen dump-site, in an upscale area that was still relatively active in the winter, in spite of numerous more isolated areas nearby, suggests that the killer wanted the body to be found relatively quickly and that he was not afraid of operating out of doors or being seen.  He may have even banked on it.

It seems that Harper's killer took greater care with the scene, folding the clothing, etc.  In contrast, Jacqueline's clothing was torn and tossed around.  Perhaps, given the circumstances, the killer had more time to pose Lynne without being seen.  Also, I'm speculating, but perhaps Jacqueline, being a bit older, put up more of a fight. 

This is all just armchair spit balling, but, to sum up, I'm struck by these similarities:  the funereal posing, the scattered clothes, and the possibility that the killer in both case seemed to ensure the quick discovery of the bodies.
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General Discussion / Re: Bruce McArthur's killing fields
« Last post by Sap1 on July 13, 2018, 02:02:34 AM »
CBC stated today that police were finished now with the ravine digs. Following link has a video detailing how they dig and why it takes so long.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/thenational/bruce-mcarthur-s-alleged-victims-why-investigating-their-remains-takes-so-long-1.4743590
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Quote
SYDNEY — Police have used DNA evidence to bring justice to a long-standing cold case.

Raymond (Glenn) Farrow, 51, of Glace Bay will be sentenced in August for the 2006 death of Harold (Buster) Slaunwhite.

Farrow was originally charged with first-degree murder in the Dominion veteran’s death and scheduled for trial later this year.

On Friday, Farrow pleaded guilty to the lesser included offence of manslaughter. The offender, who is now a double amputee, was wheeled into the Sydney justice centre by sheriff’s deputies.

It has been nearly 12 years since Slaunwhite was discovered slumped over next to his bed at his Brook Street home.

Police and paramedics discovered puncture wounds on Slaunwhite’s abdomen and slashes on his neck. What was believed to be a steak knife blade was located under the victim’s body.

“Other than the bedroom, the house appeared to be in order and undisturbed,” an agreed statement of facts reads.

An autopsy later confirmed that Slaunwhite died as a result of multiple injuries.

Slaunwhite’s residence was situated near an area that was a popular hangout for local youths. During the course of their investigation, Cape Breton Regional Police concluded that on the night prior to the discovery of Slaunwhite’s body, there were two house parties in his neighbourhood.

One party was next door to Slaunwhite’s residence and the second party was a few properties away. Police say both parties involved a large number of young people consuming alcohol and drugs, which created “a large pool of persons of interest near the victim’s residence around the time of his murder.”

According to the evidence, Slaunwhite lived alone following the death of his wife. He was known to keep large amounts of money in his home. Prior to his death, he had withdrawn $1,000 in $100 bills from a local bank. For this reason, police canvassed local businesses and inquired if any customers had offered to pay in large bills.

In an attempt to drum up leads, police held a news conference in relation to the senior’s death in July 2007. In the years that followed, very little new information surfaced. The crime left seniors living in the small seaside community feeling uneasy.

An active member of the Dominion legion, Slaunwhite had worked in the coal mines until his retirement. He was the father to six children and a former Second World War medic. He died two months before his 83rd birthday.

In 2014, a task force was set up to investigate Slaunwhite’s death, consisting of regional police and RCMP officers. They interviewed about 300 individuals and collected DNA from approximately 110 people either by cast-off method or by consent. Prior to the task force, DNA had only been collected from about 30 individuals and testing methods were limited.
http://thechronicleherald.ca/novascotia/1581246-c.b.-man-pleads-guilty-in-veteran%E2%80%99s-death-ending-decades-old-case
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Site News | About Us / Re: We're Back
« Last post by debbiec on July 12, 2018, 10:59:11 AM »
Thanks everyone.  :)
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Site News | About Us / Re: We're Back
« Last post by jensen on July 12, 2018, 06:22:17 AM »
Good to see you up and running again!  Have to admit I worried we'd lost you...this is such an important site to so many.
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