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Messages - BaySailor

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61

Unethical? If the Oland family wanted to offer a reward, why not? It's their money.

I think it would indeed be unethical for a reward to be offered through the police department when they are pursuing the arrest and conviction of an individual they believe to be the killer. If the Olands truly wanted to offer a reward they could do so without using the police department as a conduit for it, yet they have not. That seems to make it a ploy to show their support for Dennis's innocence rather than a legitimate attempt to pursue another person. If not, they should post a reward tomorrow through their lawyers or a private agency. The family has at least 37 million dollars with which to hire investigators and/or post rewards.         

62
I can't listen to this radio interview for some reason but am really intrigued as to what the family were told what might have happened to Chris that night he disappeared.


If you can figure out how to listen to it or borrow another computer I highly recommend it- it's a very poignant and illuminating piece, largely an interview with Christopher's brother who was also attending Mount A at the time. My impression is that though he is uncertain as to what happened to Christopher he thinks it most likely foul play was not part of his death. Christopher was very inebriated that night according to this doc. The family seem to be bright and good folk, and I wish them the best.     

63
That sounds like a pretty good summation to me, jb.

I have no knowledge as what sort of assets Dick kept outside of Far End but it's quite possible there were reasonable amounts kept in RRSP's and other tax deferring investment vehicles, as well as savings accounts and such. With a full time chartered accountant long working for him I would think he has been contributing to such things for many years and thus these alone would have substantial balances, and of course would transfer tax free to his wife upon his death.     

Given McFadden was retained as an employee after Dicks death and his boss would have been Dennis since then I think it's a fair assumption that he has a good working relationship with the family, and that when Connie wants money to pay legal bills, house bills, or Dennis's bills, the cheques come pretty fast.       

64
I wonder how all that will be affected if things remain as they are at present.

Since he so rarely ever showed up for work anyway, I suppose it could still continue on the same way.  Not sure if there are any legalities which might get in the way of such an arrangement, though.  An odd situation, to say the least.


I'm curious about this as well. I believe Canadian law basically denies a person convicted of a crime any proceeds from that crime, and thus Dennis would be disinherited from Dick's estate, including his $12mm share in Far End Corporation. Theoretically his mother from her trust proceeds or sisters could finance his expenses, including upkeep of the house and such, for as long as he lives and clearly have the wealth to do so, but I wonder if both sisters would be in agreement around that? If the conviction is upheld sisters Jacqui and Lisa could split the votes on the board, and that could provide for some interesting discussions. I suppose it's possible that Connie could contest that one third shareholding but it seems like a longshot to me.

I remember Dennis saying in his police interview that his father thought he could beat the stock markets but never did, and this leads me to believe that Dennis might well not have an interest in handling the investments actively, rather using mutual funds and etf's for the portfolio. Also, given McFadden's comment that building boats was more fun than working, and the time Dick spent on organizing crew for regattas and working on his community projects and such, things Dennis has not involved himself in, I suppose there's not much for him to do when he is in the office.     

65
Rubyrose, where would Dennis get the funds to buy a boat, especially if he was in financial trouble when his father died????

He bought the boat after his father died. He was well paid as co-executor of his fathers estate and is now employed leading the companies his father had. My guess would be he is well paid for that despite, according to McFadden's testimony, very rarely coming into work. 

66
Do they still own the Loki, BaySailor?

I think I had read (probably somewhere in these pages) that Dennis had bought another boat since his father died?

Dennis bought a large powerboat/trawler after his father died. I'm afraid I don't know if Mary Beth and Lisa still own the Loki or not.

67

Anyone know who Mary Beth Watt is? Connie's sister in law is a guess.

Mary Beth is (wife) Lisa's friend who co-owns the Loki with her.

68

Stranger still to me was the lengths gone to in obtaining a sample from Mr. Derek Oland.  He has stated publicly that had he been aware, he would have gladly provided a sample to police and I believe him.  I can't think he would have been considered a suspect.  If my memory serves me correctly, he was not even in the province at the time of Mr. Richard Oland's death.

Yes, I recall he was out of the country at the time. There were so many strange decisions made by LE along the way that it suggests to me they weren't thinking straight. Perhaps they were so overwhelmed by the publicity and VIP-ish nature of the case they were unable to function normally. Basic incompetence just doesn't seem to cover the ineptness and odd decision-making that went into this investigation.

69
Police carried through with testing but a little late. Was the lab busy? Oversight? New test procedures? Is this enough on its own to cause sufficient doubt?

I don't think it's unreasonable to expect an honest and competent police force to renew an expiring warrant when it lapses, regardless of the reason for a delay in testing items seized with that warrant. It's not for law enforcement to decide whether or not Dennis's actions warrant such an extension, it is for an impartial judge to decide. And that did not happen.     

70

I'd love to know whether the frequency of evidence being improperly seized or tested by law enforcement has increased since the 2009 Supreme Court's decisions. I would not be surprised to hear that such 'innocent' mistakes have 'coincidentally' become more common. It was a controversial decision by the Supreme Court then (actually 3 cases that all involved evidentiary problems) and may have created additional problems that are more problematic than the ones it attempted to resolve. The idea was that some non-malicious errors or omissions by police shouldn't be an impediment to the conviction of a guilty party, but many feel that this now gives police the ability to build a case against an accused without regard to a citizen's rights under the constitution. I'm sure the latter would be Dennis's position.

71
I have also, finally come to a decision-- I don't think that Dennis killed his father. 


May I ask how you account for the 6:30 ish cellphone ping off of the Rothesay tower? A fluke ping or somebody else such as Dick being out there at that time?

To me, that is the most incriminating piece of evidence that a jury might have a hard time getting its mind around. You have to believe someone else took it out there at that time or that it was a fluke redirected ping that neither the prosecution nor defence was able to recreate. I'm pretty sure the defense would have performed their own tests hoping to replicate it and introduce it as evidence, but without success.   


I agree the cellphone ping off the Rothesay tower is incriminating evidence.  But the Crown expert did state that it wasn't impossible for this to happen.  Highly unlikely, but not impossible.

Thanks!

72
I have also, finally come to a decision-- I don't think that Dennis killed his father. 


May I ask how you account for the 6:30 ish cellphone ping off of the Rothesay tower? A fluke ping or somebody else such as Dick being out there at that time?

To me, that is the most incriminating piece of evidence that a jury might have a hard time getting its mind around. You have to believe someone else took it out there at that time or that it was a fluke redirected ping that neither the prosecution nor defence was able to recreate. I'm pretty sure the defense would have performed their own tests hoping to replicate it and introduce it as evidence, but without success.   

73
Yes, the workforce is much smaller nowadays. In the more recent past they been a contract brewer for Guinness and such, brewing beer for others who sell regionally but do not have local production facilities. While the Irvings and McCains companies dwarf other businesses here, newer industries such as tech, and call centres, among others, have supplanted the brewing industry. Moosehead closed it's N.S. plant, as Olands Breweries did with it's Saint John plant, and both breweries have much smaller staffs now than they did in decades past. We have long struggled with our economy here in the Maritimes and such significant job losses have very painful. The Saint John Olands have always been keen to stay independent despite many overtures from the big brewers, and I think they have paid the price for that. If they had sold out there would be no head office jobs here and probably at best a small distribution and production facility owned by Guinness or Molsons, or perhaps nothing with beer products shipped in from large plants in Quebec and Ontario.           

I went back to my post and removed my comments that you have quoted BaySailor.
Yes, 400 employees would have been quite significant indeed, and thank you for your  clarification.  The press have never reported that - and have in a way done a disservice imo.
I can assume then, that this family is no longer a significant employer within N.B today?
jb

74

 I am a bit tired of learning about that Brewery and it's history.
144 employees, does not make a major industry.

All across Canada, one will find many other family businesses who also have long histories and create more numbers in employment.  Oland's business is no different from others.
Yes, they are a major industry in Saint John, NB.  What does that say about employment opportunities in that city?  If one is to go by numbers - not much!!

No disrespect intended to the D. Oland and what he has achieved, and he can take pride in how well paid his employees are....obviously this business cares about their employees. And they should be highly commended for it. They have high standards, which is very rare imo.

I should mention a couple of decades ago Moosehead had some 400 employees and 2 breweries in the Maritimes, and were indeed a major business. The Oland wealth accumulated from the last century when it was a real going concern and quite successful. Since that heyday the removal of interprovincial trade barriers and the consolidation of breweries into 4 global players Moosehead has been forced to retrench significantly.       

75
thanks for that correction, hf.

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