Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - Snively

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 5
1
Toronto / Re: Debbie Silverman (21) - Murder (Aug. 12, 1978)
« on: January 24, 2019, 11:06:39 PM »
Police think one man murdered two women

Toronto Star - Monday March 30, 1992


Two Victims:  Deborah Silverman, and Alison Thomas both vanished one month apart in 1978.  Silverman’s body was found three months later.

Two young Metro women who vanished about a month apart 14 years ago are cases that police believe  may have been the work of a serial killer.

Deborah Silverman and Alison Thomas had both been in the Yonge St.-Eglinton Ave. area on the nights they vanished in late summer, 1978.

Silverman, a 21-year-old receptionist, had been out with friends at a disco on Eglinton Ave. before driving home alone later that night on Aug. 12.

Police said she was attacked just as she was walking into the back door of her apartment building on Bathurst St., near Finch Ave., around 3 a.m.

Investigators believe she struggled with her killer, who ripped off her clothes, leaving behind her panties and her purse just inside the door of the building.

Three months later, her body was discovered in a shallow grave in the Sunderland area, north of Whitby.

Her hands were tied behind her back.  She had been shot to death.

She may have been followed home a man who frequented the same bar, one detective said.

Just over a month later, 26-year-old Alison Thomas went to a dinner party at a home in the Yonge and Eglinton area.

She left by herself late that night on Sept. 29 telling friends she was going to walk to a taxi stand on Yonge St. and take a cab home.

It was the last time anyone ever saw, or heard from her again.

2
Police think one man murdered two women

Toronto Star - Monday March 30, 1992

Two Victims:  Deborah Silverman, and Alison Thomas both vanished one month apart in 1978.  Silverman’s body was found three months later.


Two young Metro women who vanished about a month apart 14 years ago are cases that police believe  may have been the work of a serial killer.
 Deborah Silverman and Alison Thomas had both been in the Yonge St.-Eglinton Ave. area on the nights they vanished in late summer, 1978.
Silverman, a 21-year-old receptionist, had been out with friends at a disco on Eglinton Ave. before driving home alone later that night on Aug. 12.

Police said she was attacked just as she was walking into the back door of her apartment building on Bathurst St., near Finch Ave., around 3 a.m.

Investigators believe she struggled with her killer, who ripped off her clothes, leaving behind her panties and her purse just inside the door of the building.

Three months later, her body was discovered in a shallow grave in the Sunderland area, north of Whitby.

Her hands were tied behind her back.  She had been shot to death.

She may have been followed home a man who frequented the same bar, one detective said.

Just over a month later, 26-year-old Alison Thomas went to a dinner party at a home in the Yonge and Eglinton area.

She left by herself late that night on Sept. 29 telling friends she was going to walk to a taxi stand on Yonge St. and take a cab home.

It was the last time anyone ever saw, or heard from her again.

4
Reading some posts and comments on a Facebook page run by her brother, it seems that he believes the person who picked her up to take her to the Rathfon Crescent residence is involved.  It also appears that the person living at the Rathfon Crescent residence was an ex-boyfriend of hers and he was also involved.

5
Peter Stark, who was convicted in 1994 of the murder of Julie Stanton, had dated Marie Woods.  He was definitely considered a suspect at the time, and had prior to that had been charged with the stabbing of a teenage hitchhiker in 1978.  She survived but wouldn't testify and Stark only received a 6 month sentence.

In 1991 a further forensic investigation of the scene where Marie Woods body was found turned up that she been shot with a .45 caliber.  A shell casing was located and was dated to a WW2 issue bullet.  Stark was known to have received a WW2 vintage .45 Colt from his father, but he disposed of the gun and it never has been found.  While certainly a logical suspect he was never charged with the murder of Marie Woods.

Apparently Stark was considered a suspect in some other unsolved cases around the GTA at that time as well.

6
... surely might be beneficial to find out what "jobs" were being done that day, that could involve James ... if Christine was on her bike, a truck picking up a young girl and throwing her bike in the back box, would certainly not attract attention, ... other than, a father or family member taking the kid home.  The average person probably wouldn't even make a mental note of such an incident.  It would be great to be able to reach and talk to as many people as possible, going about their daily routine/lives there at the time - especially that day.  ;) ... especially kids Christine's age, or that knew her .... Kids always make a mental note when they see another kid in trouble with their parents?  ;)

I don't think she took her bike to the store that day.  She was found with her recorder with her, and as somebody pointed out, she likely was afraid she would break it while holding it and riding her bike.  Certainly seems reasonable and would explain why her bike was at home.  Without a bike to throw in the pickup truck box it would only take a second to grab a little kid and toss them in the truck.  James used the ruse of needing help to find his lost puppy and $2 to grab Lynn Ferguson, and we know Christine loved animals so I wouldn't doubt he used the exact same approach.

I talked to two people in Peterborough who were near the vicinity where Lynn was grabbed.  One said they did tell the police they saw a couple of cars near the corner store and the other didn't see any cars.  Neither saw a red pickup truck with company signage on the side.  We know that people doing identification are highly unreliable.  They are simply too oblivious to things around them (don't even get me started on today's generation! lol) or if they do see something the mind, usually innocently, fills in the blanks.  One sure thing I've found that shows things are being made up is when people start providing too many details.

You are right about kids.  Typically their accounts are very verbatim.  They don't try to fill in the blanks.  Not always, but they are also easy to spot when the begin exaggerating.  One day I'll get enough money set aside to put in a Freedom of Information request for Christine's files and be able to take a real good look at any reports from witnesses.  Despite all the information and transcripts out there, there is still so many unanswered questions.  All the compiled information available only deals with Morin.

As for jobs being done in and around the area, I know there was work being done on various subdivisions and some commercial lots and on some farms and some road work.  Nobody has the precise records for that time period that I've contacted, but every one said that at some point the lots had been cleared of scrub brush and woodcutters were hired to remove and dispose of the brush.

One thing of note is that at the time of Christine's disappearance, Highway 404 was being extended from Bloomington to Aurora Sideroad between August 1982 and September 1985.  It has been confirmed there were tree clearing crews on site at the time of October 1984 but no records exist and nobody working on the highway that day (and I've talked to many that I used to work with who were on that 404 extension at the time) remembers who they were.  They can remember the prime contractor but not the subs and unfortunately a red pickup with signage on the side is very, very common.

It just goes to show just how easy if would be for a red pickup to fit in without anyone noticing even right in the middle of Queensville.
Save

7
Snively;  I can't help but wonder if Richard James was a companion or friend of one of the clique Christine's father rubbed shoulders with?  or if he met James in prison?  .... just thoughts I've been pondering!  You are great on this case BTW. ;)

From everything I can find James was never in prison prior to being convicted of the kidnapping in Peterborough, and I also can't find any connection with him and anyone in Queensville, so I doubt very much he ever met Christine's father.  It certainly isn't conclusive.  His company and/or himself may have done work in Queensville and had direct contact with people there, even Christine's family, but I get the feeling James was one of these "people" (I really want to use another word, but I don't want to get in trouble) who get the urge and see a situation they can exploit.

I think it's far more likely he was working nearby and had noticed the school was on his route home and decided to see if he could grab a little kid when the opportunity presented itself.  I don't think this was as much a thought out plan, as it was a crime of opportunity and some local knowledge of the site in Sonya and at least a very good working knowledge of the roads in and around Queensville.

And thank you for the compliment!
Save

8
I received a letter from Peterborough Police regarding my Freedom of Information request for the files pertaining to the arrest and conviction of Richard James in the kidnapping of Lynn Ferguson and it says "the search concluded that no records exist.  The Peterborough Police Force automated their records system in 1987.  Records prior to January 1st, 1988 are limited."
 
 Nothing's easy.  But, there are still searches to be done on the Peterborough Examiner archives of the era when Trent University is finished working on the library building in the spring, as well as an attempt to located the trial transcript, and more footwork in the area in the hope that someone remembers something.

9
It wouldn't surprise me if it was simply a case of someone asking about the trailer and being told it was only used on weekends.  It could be people walking their dog, kids on dirt bikes, hunters, or somebody working in the area.  It would be interesting to find out who was doing work in the area over the past year.  Everybody from road crews to utility crews to developers to construction crews to people picking up corn and hay to people hired to clean out lots. 

I do know the company James' worked for did lot clearings all around Durham and York Region, but the police have lost those records.

10
Does anybody know if the school bus made any other stops between the school and Jessop's home? It seems plausible that she either walked from the school or if there was a stop closer to the corner store, she got off there and went to the corner store before going home. It would explain why the mail was inside the house and her bike was still found at the house. She didn't need her bike to go to the corner store because she had already been there. Somebody followed her home from the corner store and abducted her when she came back out.

I still lean to the abduction occurring outside the corner store. Somebody could see her come to the store alone and be sure she wasn't with an adult. At the house they couldn't be sure an adult wasn't inside and would come right out behind Christine. I think she just simply choose to walk to the corner store that day, rather than take her bike.

Has anybody ever seen any information about if the person working in the corner store that day was ever asked if anybody had come into the corner within the hour previous to him seeing Christine?

11
In regards the time to commit a murder during daylight: Christine was assumed to have been abducted about 4:00 pm. It's 45 minutes from Queensville to Sonya. Sunset for October 3rd, 1984 in that area is 6:56 pm. Twilight was 7:25 pm. That's a two hour window of daylight, so it is definitely possible it could be done.

12
Snively , You have did a lot of work on this and I sure as heck agree that this Richard James needs to be investigated and dna samples obtained somehow.  I wonder where he is now ? He may have changed his name ? He was convicted but no info on sentencing. 
Le should put the effort into this and do everything possible to find out if he was the murderer. The case may be old but Christine and her family deserve justice no matter how long it takes.

I filed a Freedom of Information request with Peterborough Police but it's not looking promising for further information on the kidnapping of Lynn Ferguson in Peterborough. There's still a chance but it seems the original files may have fallen through the cracks of digital archiving and may not be found. There are still some other options of foot work, trial transcripts, phone calls and newspaper archives, and maybe some luck the files will be found. The police have not been very helpful with information on the sentencing or obviously with any information on further arrests.

A person has been located who I believe is the correct person, but it can't be verified as of yet.

13
The black and white picture shows a bit better of what I'm getting at, when I say if you enter off of Simcoe St. you could see everything in front of you wide open, plus be a wider elevation. It doesn't quite go back far enough, but it gives the basic idea quite well. You could see from up there clearly. There's no trees blocking your view of the trailer as there is if you come in off of Concession 4.

The map picture in colour, is obviously an earlier picture than the Google Maps picture from the previous post. The driveway in this earlier picture doesn't go back in as it does now, but you can clearly see the farmers entrance I'm referring to.

If you go to Google Maps and go down to street view you can clearly see the entrance off of Concession 4 is at a far lower elevation than the entrance off of Simcoe St.

I wouldn't come in off of Concession 4, even if you could see no tire tracks in the mud and had scouted the location to see if anyone was there earlier in the day, you couldn't guarantee that somebody wasn't walking a dog near the trailer or if the farmer had come in off the other entrance off of Simcoe St. because you couldn't see them through the trees from Concession 4. From higher ground with a clear view, though you can see everything.

14
Now there's a driveway out to Simcoe St. from the lot where Christine was found. The lot hadn't been developed in 1984 and just had the tractor trail into the trailer, but the trail also ran well past the trailer up a small hill heading in a southerly direction.  Usually farmers would have at least two entrances, especially on a larger corner lot like that. They weren't exactly "legal" entrances, but what they would call a farmers entrance. They may have a culvert to get over the ditch, but often the ditches were shallow enough a farm vehicle or even a car or truck, could enter. Often the same farmers would be working a few lots in the area, so it would be easier to go in and out the closest entrance and certainly the one that is less muddy. With the southern portion of the lot being higher ground, it would be less muddy than the lower northern entrance off of Concession 4, and by accounts of that entrance in various books and reports, it was a well rutted entrance. Likely harder for a civilian vehicle to get in and out of.

Picture:  Shows the lot as it is today, including the location of Little Britain Rd. (the distance was incorrectly marked as 700m, it should be 900m)

15
One constant assumption is that whoever drove to the site where Christine was found, entered off of Concession 4. That winding path would not give you line of sight to the trailer. You wouldn't know if anyone was there, or a farmer walking their dog, until you were nearly on top of them.

But follow that tractor trail in the opposite direction from the trailer (more of a southerly direction) and it's leading up a small hill across an open field towards Simcoe St.. towards a farmers entrance off of Simcoe St.

Rather than enter off Concession Rd. 4, where you wouldn't be able to see if anybody was on the property, if you came in off of Simcoe St. you would be at the top of a hill looking down onto the trailer and have a wide open view to see if anybody was around either the trailer or just walking a dog.

I lean toward someone knowing that nobody was at the trailer. It could be that they knew the trailer was only used on weekends or they may have driven by earlier in the day and checked if anybody was there. But not seeing a car parked at the trailer wouldn't guarantee that nobody was there. A person could have been at the trailer while the other person took the car to pick up groceries or something like that. You would have to knock on the door to make sure and you sure wouldn't want to do that with a little kid you just grabbed sitting in your truck. There was definite knowledge of the site and very likely the schedule of people using the trailer. It wasn't picked randomly. But I do think they entered off of Simcoe St. rather than Concession Rd. 4. That would definitely give you a far better chance of seeing a farmer or somebody walking a dog eliminating at least that possibility of being disturbed.

One other possibility is that tire tracks leading to the trailer may have been visible. No tracks, no one there. Tractor tracks would be very different than tracks of road tires. Certainly if it was at all muddy you could tell if a car had gone in. From weather data for Seagrave, Ontario, which is 4km away from Sonya, Ontario, for the days of October 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, there had been 3.8mm of rain. That leads me to believe the tire tracks, or lack of, would be clearly visible. If there were no marks off of Concession 4 then you would be pretty sure that nobody had gone into the trailer. Then drive around the corner onto Simcoe St. and enter from there and see there are no farmers or dog walkers and no car at the trailer and they would be alone.


Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 5