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Messages - Have faith

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1
Hi Have Faith

I believe Thandi's cameras face in more than one direction so I'm thinking that it's possible (although I don't know) that one of them might happen to pick up something from 52 Canterbury since  it is directly across the street.

One interesting thing regarding Anthony Shaw's testimony during the first trial was that while being examined by the Crown, he was asked if  he knew Gerry Lowe.  He replied that he would not know him to see and the line of questioning was not further pursued.  It seemed somewhat strange at the time but in hindsight I recall that Shaw had said earlier that he had stepped outside (don't recall if he gave a time but likely would have given at least an approximate one) to have a cigarette.  I suspect now the Crown was attempting to make the point that Shaw could have been the man Lowe claimed to have seen.  Lowe, of course, was never called as a witness.

Regarding the Thandi video range- yes, you would think that it would show the front door to Far End Corp. offices. Although video showed D.O.'s silver car driving near 52 Canterbury, and the Thandi video showed him at his car in the parking lot beside Thandi's, I don't know of any video showing Far End Corp. entered as evidence. The first visit Dennis made to to the office had to be confirmed by the secretary's husband who was waiting outside the office. Obviously there was no video of this visit or video mentioned for his other trips to the office. I believe if they existed, they would have been valuable evidence.

Interesting questioning of Shaw by the Crown re Gerry Lowe. I think you are likely correct in reading the Crown's intentions considering that Shaw had exited the building for a smoke. Shaw would have exited out of the printing shop door, but that is pretty close to the office door. Good thinking Ruby.

edit white car to silver car.

2
Hello Everyone,

I agree with both of you regarding the police and do feel sorry for King and Oram.
The defense is doing their best to state the killer left by
The back door and the police can’t remember if the door was locked. Not being a
Resident, Thandi’s video camera caught Dennis leaving by the front door only once? Did it
catch him entering three times? And did Thandi’s video camera catch the person
this Lowe person saw leaving at 7:30 pm? Not understanding exactly where the
Camera faced exactly, it’s a bit confusing. I am also rusty on the times etc.


Hi blueriver.  My recollection is that Thandi's surveillance camera does not show R. Oland's office building at 52 Canterbury Street. Therefore, it would not capture Dennis entering or leaving the office, nor the person seen by witness Gerry Lowe leaving the building.

Dennis was caught on Thandi's video at 6:30 (after leaving RO's office) as he was about to cross the road across from Thandi's, to go to his car which was parked in the parking lot next door to Thandi's.

Gerry Lowe saw somebody leave R.O's office "sometime after 7:30". He was actually in Thandi's from 7:40 to 8:35 (per video). During this time period Dennis was caught on security video (at 7:40) across town shopping with his wife.

Anthony Shaw and John Ainsworth who were in the printing shop below R.O.'s office, both gave police statements claiming that they heard loud thumping noises coming from R.O."s office around 8pm.  During the first trial  Ainsworth (owner of 52 Canterbury) changed his statement to the time being between 6-8pm. Shaw did not change his estimate of 8pm.



Just saw Ruby's post as I was posting mine.  Hi Ruby!

3

Court testimony has been revealed which the defense allege are further examples of police "tunnel vision".  I certainly have to agree.


- Saint John Liberal MLA Gerry Lowe told police he was across the street at Thandi restaurant on either July 6, 2011, or July 5, 2011, some time after 7:30 p.m., when he saw someone exit 52 Canterbury St. Retired constable Keith Copeland testified Wednesday he interviewed Lowe on July 8 but didn't attempt to clarify whether he saw someone exiting the building on July 5 or July 6. The defense then presented the court with time-stamped security video showing Lowe entering Thandi's on July 6, 2011, at 7:40 p.m. and exiting at 8:35 p.m. Based on this timeline, Dennis was not the last person to leave RO's office the night he was killed, yet LE ignored this credible witness statement.

- Lawyer Alan Gold told the Saint John courtroom the defence intends to present evidence the Oland family offered a reward two months after Richard Oland was killed for information leading to the arrest of his killer. But the response of then-chief Bill Reid was: "It would not be proper for us to issue this reward because … we know Dennis did it," Gold alleged.

- Gold said although investigators believed the killer would have had a significant amount of blood on him or her, they were able to "ignore the absence of substantial spatter" on the brown sports jacket Oland was wearing when he visited his father on the night he was killed.  (this has always bothered me).

They "suffered from what we call 'disconfirmation bias,'" he argued. "A psychologist would understand this. They already had their theory and any evidence inconsistent with the theory would receive short shrift," while evidence that supported it was "overvalued."

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/dennis-oland-murder-retrial-saint-john-police-1.4970820


4
This might be of interest to those who may still be following this trial.  The testimony was not part of the original  trial and perhaps may be relevant?  The building and garage where the break in occurred would have been on the street that runs parallel to Canterbury Street and approx one block from Mr. Oland's former office.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/dennis-oland-trial-saint-john-1.4968298


Thanks Ruby. The more I read about the SJP, the less I trust them. I hope that claw hammer was tested for blood, and that the blood in the sink was tested for a DNA comparison to RO and DO. The killer's blood could be included. smh

"The defence has asked for new disclosure after the testimony of a retired Saint John police officer Monday at Dennis Oland's murder retrial in the death of his father more than seven years ago.

Former staff sergeant Mike King testified that on July 8, 2011 — the day after Richard Oland's bludgeoned body was discovered in his office at 52 Canterbury St. — officers called him to a possible related incident at a nearby apartment building at 147 Germain St.

The glass of the back door had been broken, there was blood in the sink and they found an old, small "claw hammer" in an open garage, said King.

King, a former roofer who had observed "the holes in the top of [the victim's] head," believed a roofer's hatchet, also known as a drywall hammer, may have been used to kill him, the court heard.

The major crime unit investigated the break-in and determined it occurred after the Oland homicide and was unrelated, said King.

But lead defence lawyer Alan Gold told the court it was the first time the defence or Crown had heard about the incident and pointed out King didn't know how investigators made that determination.

King could not say, for example, how soon after the homicide it occurred or whether they tested the blood to see if it matched Oland's, said Gold."

5

The question as to why there was no testimony at the trial from the witness who heard "loud yelling" coming from the area of DO's office at 7:30pm has been answered. Police did not follow up with her until five years later. Of course her testimony of the time would not coincide with Dennis being at Oland's office.

Gold questioning lead investigator Davidson:

He argued police didn't follow up on possible leads and didn't follow basic police academy training at the scene.

When police canvassed the area on July 8, 2011, a woman told them she had heard "loud yelling" the night Oland was killed. She said she heard the noise around 7:30 p.m., while walking on Princess Street, between Canterbury and Germain streets, said Gold.

But police did not follow up with her until Sept. 21, 2017 and never conducted a formal interview with her, he said. Instead, Davidson got a statement from her via email on Oct. 16, 2017.

"The point of canvassing was to see if people saw or heard anything relevant to the beating death of Richard Oland, right? Right?" asked Gold.

Davidson agreed.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/dennis-oland-murder-retrial-investigator-davidson-1.4943480

6
Thank you very much for trying Ruby.

I also tried to read an article in today's Chronicle Herald--so frustrating to get cut off.  The headline was "N.B. Police Commission to probe jury vetting in Dennis Oland's murder case. It is amazing that the Crown could be unaware of this practice over the years. If it is proven that they were aware, I can't imagine the fallout.

7
RubyRose,

Is there any way that you could please copy and paste the article? I can't access anything from the the S.J. Telegraph Journal as I am not a subscriber. TIA

8
That's right capeheart--talk about twists and turns!

Long story-short--The Saint John Police have screwed up again, resulting in a mistrial before the trial even began. The SJPF cop (who sat with the prosecutors during jury selection) illegally used a police data base that could help the Crown rule out any "anti-police" jurors.

As the judge noted, one of the central issues in Oland's case was the way the SJPF handled the case, and these (illegal) juror searches amplifies the appearance of unfairness. The Crown states that they were unaware that the constable was doing this, in their office, because they were busy doing other stuff.

I'm paraphrasing, but you can read it online.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/dennis-oland-murder-retrial-jury-judge-1.4904378?






9
Since she was "poked with sticks", this screams youths (young and more than one) imo

jb

I just saw this recent article about an upcoming CBC podcast "Someone Knows Something"on Kerrie's case. Apparently she wasn't "poked with sticks" as previously noted, but was actually bludgeoned to death with tree branches. Regardless, I agree that this still screams youths, and very possibly more than one.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/kerrie-ann-brown-murder-cold-case-1.4859553?fbclid=IwAR3nOH9NU6q7bB3ycoET0-i3f4xN1SAUhFOt_RuzBL1X6ZUYG_VhB2QAgLc

Read more, including photos and trailers at above link.
The killing is the subject of the new season of the CBC podcast, which found new witnesses and information about the case.
No one was ever convicted. A local man was arrested and charged with first-degree murder, but a judge stayed the charges in early 1987, citing a lack of evidence.

Over the years, the sheer volume of interviews, evidence and paperwork ballooned into the largest unsolved cold case file in Manitoba, said Const. Janna Amirault of the RCMP's historical case unit in Winnipeg. Forty-five boxes hold 14,000 documents and details about the 2,500 witnesses, friends, suspects and investigators involved over the years.

The mystery still weighs on Kerrie's best friend, Nicole Zahorodny.

The night of Oct. 16, 1986, Zahorodny and another friend stopped by the Brown family home in Thompson. "I replay that night so much," she said. "I can see us skipping down the road arm in arm, going to this guy's house."
Zahorodny recalls Kerrie sitting on her lap in a recliner at the party when Kerrie's ex-boyfriend came down the stairs. They had broken up just days earlier, and now he was hand in hand with another ex-girlfriend he dated before Kerrie.

"There was no arguing or bad blood or anything like that. It was an awkward situation," Zahorodny said.

"He had gone back to his ex-girlfriend, and we were teenagers, so it was pretty upsetting."

The girls left but re-entered the house because Zahorodny had forgotten her purse.

Zahorodny went downstairs to grab it and got into an argument with her own ex-boyfriend.

She suspects Kerrie got tired of waiting for the two to work things out on the stairs and left at about midnight.

A few minutes later, Zahorodny emerged to find a single set of footsteps in the snow leading down the driveway and ending at tire tracks on the street. They were Kerrie's, she says.
Kerrie was supposed to sleep over at her house that night. Zahorodny searched nearby streets, returning to the house party twice. Unable to find her friend, panic set in.

Zahorodny is the last person known to have seen Kerrie.

She soon found herself before a group of mourners reading her friend's eulogy. That was eventually followed by seven years of psychotherapy.

"PTSD, survivor guilt … that doesn't go away, no matter how much therapy you have."

(Donna Covic and her friend Judy found Kerrie's body while horseback riding 40 hours later)
They saw Kerrie's body lying on a jacket, with one hand up and one down. She was dressed in a pink and black leopard-print outfit and white socks, Covic said.
"You could see the face was smashed and beaten."

Someone had raped Kerrie and bludgeoned her to death with branches. Police found them at the scene, stained with blood.

Tire tracks were also found, along with a red-and-blue air mattress and a black rubber car mat, suggesting a vehicle used them for traction to get unstuck from the mud before driving off.

At the time, two teenagers described seeing a green muscle car and a white van with their lights off leave the area around midnight the night Kerrie disappeared.

Those descriptions helped RCMP identify a local 22-year-old owner of a similar muscle car, who became their prime suspect.

He was charged and there was a preliminary hearing in the case, but the judge decided not to proceed to trial, saying there was a lack of evidence against the accused.

The case languished for years until investigators found a glimmer of hope. Advances in DNA technology not available at the time of the crime helped them build profiles of two new suspects.

Investigators collected DNA samples from people associated with Kerrie or suspected of being connected to her death, but in the end, no new charges were laid, and RCMP haven't released details of the DNA profiles.

The Mounties renewed their call for tips in 2016, on the 30th anniversary of her disappearance.

The investigation is still open.

10

The landlord did it.

There, I said it! 

LOL

11
The daughters and Dennis were afraid that Dick was ready to divorce their mother and marry the mistress.

Thus lose their inheritance. They hated her and did not trust her.
A few days before the murder, Dennis was in the office and saw a note on the Accountants desk with instructions from Dick -
to bring up the will for changes and to talk to his insurance company..... so Dennis came to one conclusion.

However he was wrong - Dick added to his will that Connie would inherit almost everything, but it was to be held in Trust
She would get a certain amount every month, and if she needed more, she would have to go to the Accountant for approval.
Poor Connie - still had to go to the accountant.


Dennis ended up as President.  So he must be receiving a salary.
So if Dennis killed his father, too bad that he did not know that his mother would be cared for and he would end up with a job.


Dick had no intention of marrying Diane imo.

The whole investigation was poorly done.... well, we can all agree with that.


Dennis may well be innocent, but there were alot of things stacked against him, especially his jacket. The blood on it was recent when taken to the cleaners and it held Dick's dna.


This trial will be another block buster.  Another book and perhaps a movie.


Dick was an abusive man.....when it came to his family. imo.

I wish Dennis all the best.


jb


Hi jb, I have some comments below.

Quote jb: "The blood on it was recent when taken to the cleaners and it held Dick's dna. "

RCMP dna scientist Joy Kearsey:
"There's no way to say how the blood got on the jacket, or HOW LONG it had been there, said Kearsey." (bbm)

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/oland-trial-blood-dna-jacket-1.3332439


Quote jb: "A few days before the murder, Dennis was in the office and saw a note on the Accountants desk with instructions from Dick -
to bring up the will for changes and to talk to his insurance company..... so Dennis came to one conclusion."

I am unaware that Dennis was in Richard's office a few days before the murder. RO had just returned from a two week holiday and July 6 was his first day back at his office. There is no evidence that Dennis saw the accountant's note re the Will and there was no mention of the insurance company.

"A handwritten to-do list found on McFadden's desk at Richard Oland's office had "will" as the sixth item."

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/richard-oland-will-insurance-mcfadden-1.3301617


Quote jb: "She (Connie) would get a certain amount every month, and if she needed more, she would have to go to the Accountant for approval.
Poor Connie - still had to go to the accountant."

Both the accountant Robert Mcfadden and Dennis were the trustees of RO's Will. It is common practice, and advisable, to name in one's Will,  experienced and trusted people to oversee a large estate. The trust fund was in Mrs. Oland's name and serves the purpose of providing her with income to live comfortably, while protecting the investments and ensuring that the residual eventually ends up going to their children upon her death. A trust fund, with two trustees would also prevent Mrs. Oland from being vulnerable to being bamboozled by anybody, including her own children. It was an excellent and common arrangement imo.


Quote jb: "So if Dennis killed his father, too bad that he did not know that his mother would be cared for and he would end up with a job."

As trustee of his father's estate, Dennis would have been aware of the stipulations in RO's Will.

12

Gary Miller quits Dennis Oland's legal team as murder retrial begins.

One of Dennis Oland's defence lawyers is stepping down, just as his retrial for second-degree murder in the 2011 death of his father, multimillionaire Richard Oland, gets underway in Saint John today with jury selection.

Gary Miller, who has represented Dennis Oland from the beginning and is one of the most prominent and experienced criminal defence lawyers in New Brunswick, is being replaced by Michael Lacy of Toronto.

"It's not real complicated," Miller told CBC News. "I generally think that it's a good idea to get a fresh set of eyes on a retrial, pure and simple."
Miller, 70, of Fredericton, said he could think of only one other case in his 41-year career where he represented a client at both trial and retrial.
"And that was a relatively straightforward one-issue case," heard by a judge and jury at the first trial and by a judge alone on retrial.
"It wasn't this kind of case where there's issues all over the place," he said without elaborating.

The other members of his defence team on retrial include Alan Gold of Toronto, and James McConnell of Saint John, who were both involved in the first trial.

In reference to Gary Miller quitting, Alan Gold commented, ""He simply felt that the day-to-day work in court everyday was becoming too much. It's extremely taxing, not to mention the preparation you have to do each evening."




https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/dennis-oland-murder-trial-defence-lawyer-1.4861528?cmp=rss

13
http://thechronicleherald.ca/canada/1413091-special-report-new-oland-trial-could-take-fresh-approach-part-2

A new trial may well deal with three things: an argument, a jacket and whether the murder weapon � thought to be a drywall hammer � was swung by a left hand or a right.

PART 1: Why the second-degree murder case against Oland fell apart

A Saint John lawyer, Cheryl Johnson, heard an animated argument in or near Richard Oland�s Canterbury Street office the evening of the murder, shortly before two men working in the print shop below the office heard thumping and banging sounds, perhaps of a struggle, overhead.

Secondly, Richard Oland�s killer was likely right-handed, the pathologist�s findings suggest.


And thirdly, witnesses testified at his trial that they saw Oland on the Renforth wharf wearing a brown jacket � a jacket that was later found to have bloodstains on it. However, forensic evidence showed the car Oland drove away from his father�s office had no bloodstains.

he Crown�s argument at his trial was that Oland was strapped financially and murdered his father, to whom he already owed hundreds of thousands of dollars, when the �daddy bank�, as the prosecutor appeared to enjoy calling it, refused to extend further funds to finance his son�s �extravagant lifestyle.�

However, investigators found no hard evidence of discord between father and son, defence lawyer Alan Gold reminded judges hearing the appeal.


The Oland family�s global brewing and distillery empire provides them with vast corporate and personal wealth. Richard Oland�s personal net worth at the time of his death was about $36 million.

Dennis and Lisa Oland�s finances were indeed under water in the summer of 2011, but the jury also heard testimony that they held two-thirds equity in their home, a 20-room house and expansive property in Rothesay called Sevenacres, that Dennis inherited from his grandfather.

In addition, Dennis was managing an investment portfolio valued by his employers at $20 million to $25 million. This made the former world markets trader with CIBC Wood Gundy a definite asset to the firm.

The court also heard that Dennis had little to gain by killing his father since his mother would get all of the money, which speaks to motive. Robert McFadden, Richard Oland�s accountant and business partner, testified that Oland�s widow, Connie, receives her husband�s fortune in trust and upon her death, the trust will be dissolved and assets shared among Richard�s three children, Dennis, Jacqueline Walsh and Lisa Bustin. McFadden said that after his mother�s death, Dennis�s portion would be reduced by $538,000 � the amount advanced by his father, with $269,000 going to each sister. The advance covered the expenses of Dennis�s divorce, allowing Dennis to keep his ancestral home.

LEFT HAND, RIGHT HAND
During the trial that consumed the fall from September to Christmas 2015, the jurors were barraged with testimony from nearly 50 witnesses, and hundreds of exhibits were entered into evidence, but it was not pointed out to them directly that Oland is left-handed, his lawyers confirmed in interviews after the verdict.
For Oland to have brought a weapon to the meeting with his father suggests premeditation, yet Oland was only charged with second-degree murder. Online posts suggest he is a hobbyist who fills his off-hours sailing, tracing the Oland family�s genealogical roots, and restoring old cars.
Oland says he went to his father�s office after work on July 6, 2011, to give him a copy of a family will, 190 years old, that showed the family�s founder had been illegitimate. He said they laughed about it together because some members of the extended Oland family might find the news embarrassing.
Pathologist Dr. Ather Naseemuddin said in an interview that he wasn�t questioned about the direction of the blows during his testimony by either the prosecutor or the defence. Defence lawyers Gary Miller and Alan Gold confirmed this. In a telephone interview last January at his office at Saint John Regional Hospital, Naseemuddin said �I can�t recall� being asked by the Crown prosecutors or the defence whether the assailant was right or left handed.
Miller said in an interview in January 2016 that Naseemuddin was �mute� in court on the directions of the blows, but the lawyer agreed with the premise that it�s reasonable to expect that deeper wounds to the left side of the head would result from a right-handed killer wielding a weapon in a frontal assault. Naseemuddin wasn�t asked about that directly in court, Miller said.

However, Naseemuddin did testify that six fractures on the left side of Oland�s head were �more rapidly fatal� than the ones to the right.
That suggests �a right-handed assailant,� forensic psychologist Dr. Eric Mart of Portsmouth, N.H., said in an interview. Mart has provided expert testimony for courts in Canada and the United States on the mental state of those perpetrating violent offences.
Four of the blows created a depressed area in the skull measuring about 10 centimetres in length, seven centimetres in width and two centimetres deep. Some of them �breached the outer table of the skull,� and �entered the cranial cavity,� reaching the brain, the court heard.

THE JACKET
Video of Dennis Oland leaving his father�s office on the evening Richard Oland was killed � his face appearing serene and his clothing clean � raises doubts that he attacked his father in a sudden fit of rage because his clothing would have been bloodied and he would have had trouble regaining his composure in the time available, according to Mart.

Other video, presented in court for the time surrounding his father�s death, actually appears to offer evidence of innocence. In the two separate videos taken later in the evening of the murder, Dennis is seen shopping at a pharmacy for cold medicine for his wife and then at Cochran�s Country Market in Rothesay for a watermelon at about the time witnesses testified they heard loud noises coming from his father�s office.

No blood was found in his car or on a reusable grocery bag, folded up in the trunk, which he was carrying to and from his father�s office. A dry cleaner, who inspected the brown jacket Dennis is wearing in the video and was taken for cleaning two days after the murder, testified that Dennis�s jacket was not stained with blood or gore.
more in the link should the reader wish to continue....
http://thechronicleherald.ca/canada/1413091-special-report-new-oland-trial-could-take-fresh-approach-part-2

Their strikes me to be some hogwash in the way the defense portrays these items, particularly the financial motives. They state that Dennis's mom received Dick's money, but that's not really true.  Connie received the house and RRSP's. She also receives the income generated by the Far North investments, but the the investments themselves, 30 million plus, belong to Dennis and his sisters. While that money is indeed in trust, the trustees, depending upon it's terms, can access the capital should the want too. And while the defense here is arguing that Dennis had a tidy income as a broker we know that his boss was giving him multiple advances because he couldn't pay his bills, and his credit cards were maxed out. That doesn't jibe with their contention of 'no financial motive' to me.     


I find  the items to be compelling. Did Oland's lawyers miss the ball by not asking the pathologist if the evidence suggested that the attacker was right or left handed? Sounds like it to me. I can see why the prosecution didn't ask. Why was the lawyer's witness account (Cheryl Johnson) of a heated argument heard coming from Oland's office area, just before he was likely killed, not part of the testimony at the first trial? One of our unanswered questions--did the defense mess up on this also?

As far as Dennis having a financial motive to kill his father, I think it is evident that Richard would never allow Dennis to lose the family homestead, Sevenacres, due to financial problems. RO saved the estate after DO's divorce and I'm confident that he would do it again, and just take it off DO's share of his estate.

Unfortunately, I couldn't find the article in the link provided.


14
London / Re: Jacqueline English - London, ON - Murdered - 1969
« on: October 02, 2018, 08:30:37 PM »
Yep--see you there JWM. :)

15
Dellen Millard was found GUILTY by a judge, today, in the murder of his father, Wayne.
Glad to see this verdict.

Dellen is a serial killer....I believe he is truly a mad man who was not going to stop.
It’s like his looks morphed into that of a scary, dangerous man...which he turned out to be.

Thanks for the update jobo. I agree with you--Dellen Millard would have gone on to kill anyone who got in the way of what he wanted...a classic sign of a psychopath. Here is the link.

https://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/judge-finds-dellen-millard-guilty-of-first-degree-murder-in-death-of-father-1.4106462



Judge finds Dellen Millard guilty of first-degree murder in death of father
 
'Planned and deliberate': Millard found guilty
 
His father, Wayne Millard, was found in his bed with a bullet to the head on Nov. 29, 2012.
Judge delivers decision in Millard murder case

Liam Casey, The Canadian Press
Published Monday, September 24, 2018 4:29AM EDT
Last Updated Monday, September 24, 2018 3:35PM EDT

TORONTO -- A Toronto man who stood to inherit a multimillion-dollar aviation company was found guilty of first-degree murder in his father's death Monday, a ruling that marked his third such conviction.
Applause broke out as a judge declared Dellen Millard had carried out a planned and deliberate killing of his father, whose death was initially ruled a suicide.
Wayne Millard, a wealthy 71-year-old businessman, was found dead in his bed with a bullet lodged in his brain on Nov. 29, 2012. His son had pleaded not guilty in the death but the judge hearing the case found otherwis

"I am satisfied that Dellen Millard killed his father by shooting him in the left eye as he slept," said Justice Maureen Forestell. "I can find no theory consistent with innocence."
Millard, 33, cried softly as the decision was read out to a packed courtroom.
Among those who had gathered for the ruling in the judge-alone trial were the parents of Millard's two other victims, Toronto woman Laura Babcock and Hamilton man Tim Bosma. Babcock's father said all three families would be forever linked as a result of Millard's crimes.
"It's been proven that not only has the Bosmas and ourselves have lost a loved one, the Millard family must live with the fact this heinous individual murdered his own father," Clayton Babcock said outside court. "There'll be not a day in our lives when the loss of Laura, Tim or Wayne won't be felt."
Crown attorney Ken Lockhart said he was grateful for the outcome of the case.
"I hope that the process has brought (the families) some kind of closure," he said.
Wayne Millard's death was Dellen Millard's second murder.
He had killed Babcock, a 24-year-old woman he had been seeing, months earlier in July 2012. Six months after his father's death, Millard killed Bosma after taking the 32-year-old man's truck for a test drive.
Millard's friend, Mark Smich, was also convicted of first-degree murder for the Babcock and Bosma slayings. The pair are serving life in prison with no chance for parole for 50 years for those murders.
Police re-opened the case of Wayne Millard's death after arresting the younger Millard for Bosma's killing.
The latest trial unfolded in June without a jury. The Attorney General granted a defence request for a judge-alone proceeding after agreeing that Millard's notoriety, given the Bosma and Babcock murders, would make it impossible to find fair jurors.
Prosecutors alleged Millard killed his father because millions in potential inheritance money was being squandered on a new aviation business.
Forestell rejected significant parts of the Crown's case, including the motive for money, saying it played no role in her decision. Instead, she found the case turned on a lie Millard told investigators after his father's death.
The trial heard Millard told police he found his father dead in bed around 6 p.m. on Nov. 29, 2012. He said he last saw his father alive around noon the day before and had then stayed the night at Smich's house. But phone records indicated that one of Millard's phones moved from Smich's house around 1 a.m. on Nov. 29, 2012, to his father's home where it stayed until shortly after 6 a.m.

Judge finds Dellen Millard guilty of first-degree murder in death of father
 
'Planned and deliberate': Millard found guilty
 
His father, Wayne Millard, was found in his bed with a bullet to the head on Nov. 29, 2012.
Judge delivers decision in Millard murder case
 
From CTV Kitchener's Rosie Del Campo: The judge has ruled Dellen Millard guilty in the killing of his father, Wayne Millard.
'We're going to be seeking another life sentence.
   

Liam Casey, The Canadian Press
Published Monday, September 24, 2018 4:29AM EDT
Last Updated Monday, September 24, 2018 3:35PM EDT
TORONTO -- A Toronto man who stood to inherit a multimillion-dollar aviation company was found guilty of first-degree murder in his father's death Monday, a ruling that marked his third such conviction.
Applause broke out as a judge declared Dellen Millard had carried out a planned and deliberate killing of his father, whose death was initially ruled a suicide.
Wayne Millard, a wealthy 71-year-old businessman, was found dead in his bed with a bullet lodged in his brain on Nov. 29, 2012. His son had pleaded not guilty in the death but the judge hearing the case found otherwise
"I am satisfied that Dellen Millard killed his father by shooting him in the left eye as he slept," said Justice Maureen Forestell. "I can find no theory consistent with innocence."
Millard, 33, cried softly as the decision was read out to a packed courtroom.
Among those who had gathered for the ruling in the judge-alone trial were the parents of Millard's two other victims, Toronto woman Laura Babcock and Hamilton man Tim Bosma. Babcock's father said all three families would be forever linked as a result of Millard's crimes.
"It's been proven that not only has the Bosmas and ourselves have lost a loved one, the Millard family must live with the fact this heinous individual murdered his own father," Clayton Babcock said outside court. "There'll be not a day in our lives when the loss of Laura, Tim or Wayne won't be felt."
Crown attorney Ken Lockhart said he was grateful for the outcome of the case.
"I hope that the process has brought (the families) some kind of closure," he said.
Wayne Millard's death was Dellen Millard's second murder.
He had killed Babcock, a 24-year-old woman he had been seeing, months earlier in July 2012. Six months after his father's death, Millard killed Bosma after taking the 32-year-old man's truck for a test drive.
Millard's friend, Mark Smich, was also convicted of first-degree murder for the Babcock and Bosma slayings. The pair are serving life in prison with no chance for parole for 50 years for those murders.
Police re-opened the case of Wayne Millard's death after arresting the younger Millard for Bosma's killing.
The latest trial unfolded in June without a jury. The Attorney General granted a defence request for a judge-alone proceeding after agreeing that Millard's notoriety, given the Bosma and Babcock murders, would make it impossible to find fair jurors.
Prosecutors alleged Millard killed his father because millions in potential inheritance money was being squandered on a new aviation business.
Forestell rejected significant parts of the Crown's case, including the motive for money, saying it played no role in her decision. Instead, she found the case turned on a lie Millard told investigators after his father's death.
The trial heard Millard told police he found his father dead in bed around 6 p.m. on Nov. 29, 2012. He said he last saw his father alive around noon the day before and had then stayed the night at Smich's house. But phone records indicated that one of Millard's phones moved from Smich's house around 1 a.m. on Nov. 29, 2012, to his father's home where it stayed until shortly after 6 a.m.
"I do not believe the statement of Dellen Millard that he stayed at Mark's," Forestell said. "I find it was fabricated to conceal he was involved in the death of his father."
Forestell also said Millard created a false alibi after leaving his truck, credit card and his other phone at Smich's house.
The trial also heard that Dellen Millard, who did not testify in his own defence, bought a handgun found next to his father's body from a weapons dealer -- evidence Forestell accepted. Dellen Millard's DNA was on the gun.
The defence argued Wayne Millard's death was a suicide.
Dellen Millard told police his father was depressed, an alcoholic and under a tremendous amount of stress because of his efforts to turn around the family's aviation business, court heard.
"He carried some great sadness with him throughout life that I never knew -- he never wanted to share that with me," Dellen Millard told police in an interview played in court.
Wayne Millard had inherited the family aviation business, Millardair, from his father, Carl Millard, in 2006. It had been launched as a cargo carrier in 1963 and later flew passengers before going bankrupt in 1990, court heard.
The company then rented out aircraft hangars at Toronto's Pearson airport until 2010, when Wayne Millard moved into the maintenance, repair and overhaul business and built a massive, multi-million dollar hangar at the Region of Waterloo International Airport by 2012.
The trial heard that Dellen Millard blamed his father for the company's financial issues.
"The last time I spoke to him, I told him the company's financial troubles were his doing and that he was a failure," Millard wrote in a text to his girlfriend that was presented in court. "Usually he tells me not to worry. But this time he said maybe I was right."
Days after his father's death, Dellen Millard fired everyone at Millardair and wound the business down, court heard.
A sentencing hearing for Millard is scheduled for Nov. 16. The Crown said it will seek an additional 25 years of parole ineligibility for Millard in his father's death.
   

https://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/judge-finds-dellen-millard-guilty-of-first-degree-murder-in-death-of-father-1.4106462

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