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Messages - George Fayne

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1
Donna's sister discussed the case on the podcast, "Murder in the Family": http://themurderinmyfamily.com/episode-23-donna-jean-awcock/

2
I realize that these incidents are decades apart, but I'm struck by the similarities between Cindy's death and the murders of Jackie English, Lynda White, Soroya O'Connell in London in the 1960s and 1970s.  I'm also reminded of the 1966 murder of Georgia Jackson in Aylmer.

The main similarity that grabs my attention is the scattering of clothing and other articles belonging to the victim. Prior to the discovery of Georgia Jackson's body, her scarf and coat were discovered along a nearby highway and a county road, respectively, outside of the town of Aylmer.  Jackie English's bra, underwear and shoes were similarly scattered (though in this case after the discovery of her body).  Prior to the discovery of Lynda White's body in 1973, a Bayham township farmer discovered a bundle containing her clothing.  The bundle was located about 25 miles away from where her body was eventually located. 

There are other more general similarities:  the victims were all women in their teens, early 20s.  All walking home.  All of their remains were located in rural areas, close to secondary highways and/or railway tracks.  All accepted (or were forced to accept) a ride.  I hate to bring up this uncomfortable fact, but, there's evidence of dismemberment in most of these cases.  Another commenter in this thread raised the possibility of refrigeration or some sort of post mortem preservation.  Though Cindy disappeared two months prior to her discovery, her remains suggest that she was either kept alive for a period of time or that the killer may have preserved her remains.  The possibility of post-mortem preservation is something that Michael Arntfield has brought up (or at least hinted at) in connection with some of these London murders (esp. Jackie English, Lynda White and Soroya O'Connell).  See Arntfield's book: Murder City, which is my main source here.  Again, apologies for "going there"-- this stuff is very disturbing.

Arntfield believes that English, White, and O'Connell were killed by the same person.  He also suggests that the person is "out there" and has probably continued to murder.  Is Cindy is another victim?

I'll add that the Simcoe OPP has created a series of videos about Cindy.  They provide good details about the case and they also do a good job of reminding us that Cindy was more than just a victim of some awful predator.

https://youtu.be/QDS2GWMF6kw

https://youtu.be/ob_wa3bTn0k

https://youtu.be/U6icLbdEiHI

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QzQN0re9nfo


3
London / Re: Irene Francis Gibbons - Strathroy, ON - Murdered - 1975
« on: December 21, 2018, 02:03:11 PM »
He doesn't mention Irene in this particular presentation, but here's a video of Ruhl delivering a talk about Harper:  https://youtu.be/exXwg78_W2c

Until this point, I've assumed that whoever targeted Irene had a paraphiliac interest in older women, so I've tried to link her case with other women around or above her age.  I'm not sure if "Larry Talbot" is responsible or not, but I will say that after gaining a stronger insight into the location of Irene's home (at the head of a T intersection, across from a schoolyard in summer, little landscaping), my gut is telling me that Irene's killer must have been a prowler of some sort.  Someone who either worked or lived in the area.  He may have had a paraphiliac interest in older women, yes, however, it's also possible that the killer was simply attracted to the visibility of her house and her vulnerability, as a woman on her own.  Her age in itself may not be a principle factor.


4
Oakville / Re: Pauline Dudley - Oakville, ON - Murdered - 1973
« on: December 21, 2018, 01:43:05 PM »
Here's the  link to a newspaper article published in The Canadian Champion (Milton) shortly after Pauline's death. I found this via the Halton Historical and newspapers database, which anyone can access through the Oakville Public Library site.

I'll add a transcription at some point when I have more time.

According to the article, Dudley's body was in a state of advanced decomposition so her cause of death was impossible to determine (at least at that time).  She did have a hairline fracture along her jaw.

5
Oakville / Re: Pauline Dudley - Oakville, ON - Murdered - 1973
« on: December 21, 2018, 01:29:03 PM »
I was recently reviewing Barry Ruhl's book on the murder of Lynne Harper in which he introduces his theory that Harper and Pauline Dudley were killed by the same person, a travelling salesman who he refers to as "Larry Talbot."

In another post about Lynne Harper, I mentioned that there's been so much attention paid to the question of Steven Truscott's culpability that no one in the general public seems to consider the crime scene.  It's obvious to me that the poor girl was targeted by an experienced, sexually motivated killer (not a 14 year old boy!).  The posing of her body makes this very clear.

Anyways, I'm interested in the possible connection between Harper and Dudley.  Ruhl points out that both young women were discovered posed in a similar manner, but he doesn't go into any detail, aside from mentioning that the killer covered them both in branches or brush.  I've looked into Dudley a bit, but unfortunately it seems there's little information about her murder.  Sadly, it seems she's been forgotten.  I hope there are efforts to restore her to the public memory.

6
From Global News

Composite sketches of a killer are provincial police’s latest hope in solving the murder of an elderly Innerkip-area woman 30 years ago.

Thera Dieleman was found beaten and strangled in her Blandford-Blenheim Township home, the afternoon of Sept. 16, 1988. OPP say her last known contact was a phone call around 5 p.m. the evening before, just a few minutes after she’d been dropped off after a day of shopping in Goderich with friends.

During a media conference at West Region OPP headquarters, Det. Supt. Ken Leppert said the original investigation narrowed the timeline in which the elderly widow and Second World War internment camp survivor was killed.

“Rural mail delivery had already occurred at 10 a.m. that morning. This mail was found within Mrs. Dieleman’s residence, and had been opened,” he explained.

7
Windsor / Re: Autumn Taggart (31), Murdered, June 10/2018, Windsor, ON
« on: August 28, 2018, 11:38:55 AM »
From the Seattle Times:

Canadian man wanted for rape and murder in Windsor, Ontario, arrested in Kent

Originally published August 28, 2018 at 6:00 am Updated August 27, 2018 at 8:42 pm

By Agueda Pacheco-Flores
Seattle Times staff reporter
A Canadian man, wanted in the June 2018 rape and homicide of a 31-year-old mother in Windsor, Ontario, as her young son lay listening in the next room, has been arrested at his parents’ home in Kent and is facing extradition in U.S. District Court.

Jitesh Bhogal was arrested on a federal warrant issued earlier this month in U.S. District Court in Seattle after he was charged with first-degree murder and aggravated sexual assault in Canada on Aug. 5. Bhogal faces a detention and status hearing  Friday before Magistrate Judge James P. Donohue.

Prosecutors indicate they intend to file formal extradition papers soon, according to the court docket.


If convicted in Canada, he faces life in prison.

Bhogal is accused in the June 10 killing of Autumn Taggart, who was found in her third-floor-apartment bedroom late that day by her former boyfriend after their 9-year-old son said his mother had been in bed all day and he could not wake her.  Taggart is identified in U.S. court documents only by her initials.

Court documents say Homeland Security agents in Detroit, acting at the behest of Canadian authorities, followed Bhogal to a bar after he became a suspect in the crime and obtained Bhogal’s DNA from a beer glass, allegedly matching it to DNA found on Taggart’s body by forensic pathologists.

Bhogal is identified in court documents as a 28-year-old Canadian citizen who works in Detroit for a “major automobile manufacturer” as a “senior design release engineer.” Documents indicate he traveled almost daily between the United States and Canada.


According to court documents containing information provided by Canadian authorities, Bhogal had been at an apartment next door to the victim with an acquaintance, where they made arrangements to buy a small amount of cocaine.  The friend said Bhogal also wanted to hire a prostitute.

Taggart’s neighbor told police that he and Bhogal “consumed” some cocaine while sitting in Bhogal’s car — a late-model SUV — and then the friend took the drugs inside, later telling police he had intended to rob Bhogal all along. He told investigators he left Bhogal in the parking lot.

Later that morning, the neighbor awoke and saw that Bhogal’s vehicle was still in the parking lot, near the victim’s apartment. Investigators later found footprints on the roof of another truck that had been parked beneath the apartments and believe the killer accessed the victim’s home by climbing up two exterior balconies and entered through an unlocked sliding-glass door, according to court documents.

Police were first able to identify Bhogal through his cellphone number, which was used to make the drug deal. Investigators began tracking his movements, and said his travel and appearance changed after the date of the slaying.


Officials say Bhogal had a NEXUS identification card, a special form of ID for “low-risk travelers” to avoid long waits at border-entry points, according to documents.

Homeland Security agents followed Bhogal to a Michigan bar, where they took a beer glass he drank from and used it to obtain DNA that Canadian officials say matched evidence from the crime scene, according to documents.

Investigators say he left the vehicle he was allegedly driving the night Taggart was killed at his parents’ home in Kent, and he obtained a Washington driver’s license.


According to documents filed in U.S. District Court, the Windsor Police Service (WPS) was dispatched to the victim’s apartment the evening of June 10 after her 9-year-old son texted his father using his mother’s phone saying “mommy won’t wake up.”

When authorities arrived and entered her room, according to documents, they found Taggart’s body. An autopsy showed she had been badly beaten, raped and strangled.

According to statements made by the 9-year-old child to Windsor police, a man came into his room and told him to go to his bed and sleep. Afterward, the boy said he “heard a girl screaming … but did not get up to investigate because he was scared,” according to court papers. The boy spent the day watching TV and eating cookies before texting his father at almost 8 p.m. because his mother was still in bed, the document say.

A phone call to Bhogal’s defense lawyer, Gregory Murphy, was not returned.


 
 

8
Other Locations / Thera Dieleman (80) | Murdered | Innerkip, ON | 1988
« on: August 28, 2018, 07:21:56 AM »
OPP to reveal new details about 1988 homicide
BY DALE CARRUTHERS
ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED: AUG 27, 2018

Thera Dieleman of Innerkip, was a murder victim who died in her home at the age of 80
A 30-year-old Southwestern Ontario murder is expected to take a new twist Tuesday, with investigators of an 80-year-old widow’s slaying saying they’ll reveal new suspect information.

Ontario Provincial Police have called a news conference to discuss the unsolved homicide of Thera Dieleman, whose strangled and beaten body was found near the front door of her Innerkip home, north of Woodstock in Oxford County, on Sept. 16, 1988.

Dieleman had lived in Indonesia, then a Dutch colony, and survived three years in an internment camp after the Japanese invaded the country during the Second World War.

The elderly woman likely resisted and injured her attacker before dying, police have said.

It’s the second time this summer police in the London region have gone public in a bid for help solving decades-old unsolved cases, a tactic one expert says can pay off, in part because so many years have gone by.

“Often, the passage of time allows people to become less reluctant to speak and all they need is a bit of a prompt or a nudge to come forward with what they know,” said Mike Arntfield, a former London police detective who’s now a Western University sociology professor and author of a best-selling book on cold-case killings.

The OPP held a news conference 10 years ago about the Dieleman case and said they’d recovered a man’s DNA from her body but needed someone to name the person responsible for her slaying.

The DNA didn’t match any of the persons of interest in the case, nor did police find the suspect among those in the national DNA databank, they said at the time.

No arrests were made, despite a $50,000 reward.

Last seen alive on Sept. 15, 1988, after being dropped off at her home following a day in Goderich, Dieleman didn’t answer the phone when friends tried calling her the next day. Witnesses reported seeing a red, flatbed truck in Dieleman’s driveway on the day her body was found.

Tuesday’s news conference is scheduled for 11 a.m. at the OPP’s regional headquarters in London.

The OPP also went public last month,  to try to solve another old case, the death of Suzanne Deborah Miller, 25, whose body was found in a wooded area near Thorndale, on Oct. 12, 1974.

Police posted a video describing Miller’s killing to the OPP’s YouTube channel and shared it across social media. Bus ads and a minivan outfitted with information about the case were used to prompt people with information to call police. A reward for information about the Miller case was increased to $50,000.

But Arntfield criticized the OPP for their track record of not releasing enough information to the public in the early stages of death investigations.

“Unfortunately, with this agency, the public is never kept in the loop during the initial, critical, first phase of the investigation. These pressers, 10, 20, 30 years later, are often the first piece of information that they’ve ever publicly confirmed,” he said.

“I guess we’ll wait and see what they have to say.”

dcarruthers@postmedia.com

twitter.com/DaleatLFPress

9
London / Re: Irene Francis Gibbons - Strathroy, ON - Murdered - 1975
« on: August 28, 2018, 07:17:18 AM »
Thera Dieleman of Innerkip (1988)

******
OPP to reveal new details about 1988 homicide
BY DALE CARRUTHERS
ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED: AUG 27, 2018

Thera Dieleman of Innerkip, was a murder victim who died in her home at the age of 80
A 30-year-old Southwestern Ontario murder is expected to take a new twist Tuesday, with investigators of an 80-year-old widow’s slaying saying they’ll reveal new suspect information.

Ontario Provincial Police have called a news conference to discuss the unsolved homicide of Thera Dieleman, whose strangled and beaten body was found near the front door of her Innerkip home, north of Woodstock in Oxford County, on Sept. 16, 1988.

Dieleman had lived in Indonesia, then a Dutch colony, and survived three years in an internment camp after the Japanese invaded the country during the Second World War.

The elderly woman likely resisted and injured her attacker before dying, police have said.

It’s the second time this summer police in the London region have gone public in a bid for help solving decades-old unsolved cases, a tactic one expert says can pay off, in part because so many years have gone by.

“Often, the passage of time allows people to become less reluctant to speak and all they need is a bit of a prompt or a nudge to come forward with what they know,” said Mike Arntfield, a former London police detective who’s now a Western University sociology professor and author of a best-selling book on cold-case killings.

The OPP held a news conference 10 years ago about the Dieleman case and said they’d recovered a man’s DNA from her body but needed someone to name the person responsible for her slaying.

The DNA didn’t match any of the persons of interest in the case, nor did police find the suspect among those in the national DNA databank, they said at the time.

No arrests were made, despite a $50,000 reward.

Last seen alive on Sept. 15, 1988, after being dropped off at her home following a day in Goderich, Dieleman didn’t answer the phone when friends tried calling her the next day. Witnesses reported seeing a red, flatbed truck in Dieleman’s driveway on the day her body was found.

Tuesday’s news conference is scheduled for 11 a.m. at the OPP’s regional headquarters in London.

The OPP also went public last month,  to try to solve another old case, the death of Suzanne Deborah Miller, 25, whose body was found in a wooded area near Thorndale, on Oct. 12, 1974.

Police posted a video describing Miller’s killing to the OPP’s YouTube channel and shared it across social media. Bus ads and a minivan outfitted with information about the case were used to prompt people with information to call police. A reward for information about the Miller case was increased to $50,000.

But Arntfield criticized the OPP for their track record of not releasing enough information to the public in the early stages of death investigations.

“Unfortunately, with this agency, the public is never kept in the loop during the initial, critical, first phase of the investigation. These pressers, 10, 20, 30 years later, are often the first piece of information that they’ve ever publicly confirmed,” he said.

“I guess we’ll wait and see what they have to say.”

dcarruthers@postmedia.com

twitter.com/DaleatLFPress


11
Windsor / Autumn Taggart (31), Murdered, June 10/2018, Windsor, ON
« on: August 08, 2018, 11:01:33 PM »
CBC NEWS
Windsor

Police look for vehicle in Windsor murder case and release cause of death
 
Investigators believe victim's child was inside the home where the homicide happened

June 23, 2018

Windsor police release photo of homicide victim Autumn Taggart, also known as Maya Madolyn. (Windsor police)
Just a day after Windsor police released the photo of a recent homicide victim, authorities now say they're looking for more information about a vehicle possibly involved with the case.

Police are seeking a dark, newer model SUV that was parked behind the apartment building where Autumn Taggart's body was found on June 10 around 8 p.m. The apartment building is located at the corner of University Avenue West and McKay Avenue. It's believed the vehicle was there from 3 a.m. to 7 a.m. earlier that same day.

Investigators also say her 9-year-old child was inside the home when it happened.

The cause of death has been listed as blunt force trauma to parts of Taggart's body. The 31-year-old woman also goes by the name of Maya Madolyn.

Windsor police investigating woman found dead in her apartment as a homicide

With hopes of engaging more people who aren't connected to social media, police will have the mobile command post stationed at the intersection of McKay Avenue and University Avenue West on Saturday and Sunday.

Authorities are asking neighbours in the area to look around their yards for items that don't normally belong there.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/windsor/police-look-for-vehicle-in-windsor-murder-case-and-release-cause-of-death-1.4718875

12
London / Re: Suzanne Miller, Sept 15th 1974, 26 years old, London
« on: July 24, 2018, 01:04:06 PM »
Hello summer69baby,

Thank you for the reminder!  I edited my previous comment-- I'm happy to change/delete my comments if they cause distress or are insensitive.  Please let me know.  I hope that they resolve this case!

gf

13
London / Re: Suzanne Miller, Sept 15th 1974, 26 years old, London
« on: July 20, 2018, 10:30:47 AM »
Here's a follow-up.  I'm giving a massive "side-eye" to some of the victim-blaming language used by the initial investigator (though, I suppose, his account gives insight into how the police treated Suzanne's case at the time).  It seems like they are suggesting that Suzanne's killer might have been someone that she knew.  I'm curious about the car-- did the killer have possession of it (later moving it to Argyle Mall)?  Or did Suzanne leave her car at the mall and it was only noticed eight days later?  Investigators seem to think that another car is involved.


****

The cases that never close haunt retired police officers.

It’s been 26 years since OPP Supt. Murray Peer, 82, retired from the job. Yet, in May, he woke up in the middle of the night thinking about what happened to Suzanne Miller.

Suzanne Deborah Miller found dead in 1974. (London Free Press files)

More than four decades have passed since then-Det. Sgt. Peer, and a team of investigators from both the OPP and the London police, set out to solve her slaying.

“I thought about it and it just runs through my mind if there was anything that could have been done or should have been done…. you just wish it would be cleared up,” Peer said.

“You think about the victim. It would be fair to her if it could be cleared.”

A month after the memories startled him from sleep, OPP investigators contacted Peer about Miller’s homicide to kick-start the investigation and possibly find a killer from 1974.

On Thursday, the OPP and London police announced “Find My Killer,” a campaign aimed at cracking the Miller case using modern social media tools and advertising.

The hope is there still is someone out there, somewhere, who has information that could lead to an arrest for the killing. The body of the 25-year-old mother of three, who went missing 10 days shy of her 26th birthday, was found in a wooded area near Thorndale on Oct. 12, 1974, almost a month after she disappeared.

“There has been obvious advancements in technology and Internet that allows us to reach a global community now, as opposed to the local London community that existed through traditional media at the time of this horrific occurrence,” said Det. Supt. Ken Leppert of the OPP’s criminal investigation services.

Similar approaches have been used in other cases and there was recent success in a 27-year old case in Simcoe County, he said.

The OPP want to reach a worldwide audience. Their video describing the crime and the investigation is posted on the OPP’s YouTube channel and shared on their various social media platforms. They will have London Transit bus ads and a “rolling billboard,” a mini-van wrapped with information and where to call with tips.

The van will be “strategically” parked in various places around London, they said.

And a reward for information has been increased to $50,000.

Even though the case is almost 44 years old – and those most likely to remember are in their 60s or older — the police said they are certain this approach will reach people who may have information.

“We are proud to not close homicide cases no matter the duration of the investigations. We are very much committed to moving those investigations forward in spite of the date of the occurrence, in support of the community, in support of the victim and victim’s family,” Leppert said.

Miller was last seen on Sept. 16, 1974 when she left her Gammage Street apartment in her blue Datsun car. Her sister, Sheila Jack, said in the new OPP video that her sister, who she described as an introvert who loved to cook and sew, was supposed to meet her at Jack’s apartment, but never showed up.

The car was found a week later in the Argyle Mall parking lot.

Miller’s badly decomposed body, still clothed, was found next to the Thames River in Thorndale. She had died of blunt force trauma to the head.

Given that there are many unsolved homicides in the London area, particularly in the late 1960s and early 1970s, it’s unclear why the OPP are focusing on the Miller case. They do want to try the same multimedia approach in other cases.

And Leppert wouldn’t say if they had a suspect in mind, but said they have “an ongoing file” in the Miller investigation.

“In this case, there is a very strong potential that those responsible are out in the community and I would suggest that it’s every bit as important today that we try to bring those individuals before the courts and before justice as it was in 1974,” he said.

Peer said investigators had suspects during their probe in 1974. “I think it’s fair to say we had a person of interest and still do,” he said, but they were never able to make an arrest. He wouldn’t say who it was.

Michael Arntfield, a former London police officer, now a Western University professor and the author of Murder City, which examined unsolved homicides in the London area from 1959 to 1984, said the re-examination of the Miller file is a sign that the police may have some new information “that has allowed them to earmark this investigation as one that offers a prospect of solvability.”

Arntfield said he hinted at Miller’s murder as a “personal cause homicide” in his book, meaning that the murderer was motivated by personal reasons that have to do with their relationship with the victim.

“The name is already in the box,” Arntfield said. “It means that the suspect was likely identified early on and . . . they weren’t able to conclusively link them to the crime at the time.”

Miller’s homicide, he said, is similar to the 1963 slaying of Margaret Sheeler in which the police could never nail the prime suspect.

“In these cases, you often don’t have to look too far from the victim’s inner circle,” Arntfield said.

Arntfield also noted that a campaign like this one takes a lot of work, so for police to be taking this step, he said, they likely put some “considerable thought” into what the end game is.

“You would have to think there’s a broader strategy to this campaign other than just trying to solicit tips for the sake of keeping the case alive,” Arntfield said.

That suspect likely isn’t the mystery man who attended Miller’s funeral visitation and signed the register as “a friend,” leaving $20 for flowers. Even though police looked for the man at the funeral and produced a police sketch, Peer said he doesn’t know how or if the man fits into the case.

They knew Miller was a young woman who “maybe we would say she had come from the other side of the tracks or seemed to follow that path, which ultimately led to her demise,” Peer said.

“I had a feeling through the investigation , we just kind of felt sorry for her all the way through,” he said.

While there were good leads at the beginning of the investigation, there were difficulties in piecing the case together after the body was found so long after her disappearance. What would have helped them, he said, are modern investigative tools, such as DNA collection, that weren’t available in 1974.

But that doesn’t mean the case can’t be solved. “When a case isn’t solved, we shouldn’t let it rest and we haven’t in this case,” Peer said.

There have been two or three other investigative blitzes on the open file during the years, but without an arrest.

“There’s obviously someone out there, maybe more than one, that knows something,” Peer said.

“And this might be a good time to clear the air, if they choose to do that, and we hope they will.”

Anyone with information can call the dedicated toll-free line at 1-844-677-5060, or by email at SMillerTips@opp.ca. Anonymous tips can be left on the CrimeStoppers line at 1-800-222-8477 (TIPS)

jsims@postmedia.com

shmehta@postmedia.com

twitter.com/JaneatLFPress

twitter.com/ ShaluatLFP

https://lfpress.com/news/local-news/can-find-my-killer-campaign-finally-crack-1974-london-murder

14
London / Re: Irene Francis Gibbons - Strathroy, ON - Murdered - 1975
« on: July 15, 2018, 01:38:01 PM »
If you go a "Google Maps" search of the address listed in the article that I had posted in my previous entry, you might notice a couple of things (I'm not directly posting the address out of respect for the current home owner's privacy).  Firstly, that Irene's house is right in the centre of a "T" intersection and is extremely visible.  Secondly, the houses in this neighbourhood are very close together.  The yards are tiny.

The intersection detail is very striking to me.  Irene's house would have been fairly visible to a passer-by.  I read somewhere that houses situated at intersections are often targeted by intruders because of their visibility, and because it's easier for a passing car or bicyclist to linger at an intersection without notice.  The openness of this area suggests to me that the location is a prime factor in this case.  In other words, my gut is telling me that Irene was not murdered by someone that she knew through previous encounters, rather she was targeted by someone who was creeping the neighbourhood. 

I'm not certain what to say about the close proximity of the houses.  Perhaps the killer knew of some pathway that would enable an easy escape?

15
London / Re: Jacqueline Dunleavy, 16, - London, ON - Murdered - 1968
« on: July 15, 2018, 01:25:50 PM »
Has anyone ever considered any connection between Jacqueline Dunleavy and Lynne Harper?  I ask this because Jacqueline was apparently discovered lying on her back "in a ceremonious mortuary position" (Murder City 104).  Though the murder seemed to happen quickly, the killer took the time to pose her and to scatter her shoes, boots, bag, torn pantyhose, underwear around her body.  Furthermore, he left her exposed, her blouse torn and her skirt lifted (Murder City 104).  Also, she was garroted by her scarf.  I'm just considering this against Julian Sher's description of Lynne Harper in his book about Truscott.  I'll copy what I wrote on the Harper thread:

Quote
View Profile

Re: Lynne Harper - 1959 - Murdered - Clinton
« Reply #22 on: June 03, 2018, 01:55:10 PM »
It seems that folks are so fixated on the whole Steven Truscott business that many details pertinent to the Lynne Harper case have been forgotten.  Her death was clearly part of a larger series of necrophiliac killings that seemed strangely common in Southwestern Ontario at this time.  She went missing on the evening of June 9th, 1959 and was discovered on the afternoon of June 11th, 1959.

To summarize some of the physical evidence*:

She was discovered lying on her back, her right leg slightly turned, bent at the knee.  Her left leg was straight.  Her left arm lay across her chest, her right arm was bent at the elbow, her palm turned up near her head.
She only wore an undershirt, which was pulled up.
An assessment of her stomach contents initially placed her time of death at approximately midnight on June 10th.  This evidence is, of course, fairly contentious.
Wounds on her left leg, mud on her right foot suggest that she was dragged into the forest, over a barbed wire fence.  Her left shoulder was also wounded and a small amount of blood was discovered on the ground beneath it.  There was some blood on her underwear and shorts
Her shoes and socks had been removed
Her blouse was used as a garotte.
A button from her blouse was discovered by her left shoulder.
Her body may have been left on its left side for about an hour after death (this point also seems contentious).
Her locket was discovered, unclasped, hanging off of a barbed wire on the west edge of Lawson's bush.  It was discovered on June 19th.
A large piece of her blouse had been cut out and removed (nine by ten inches).
Footprints were found by her body.
Her clothing had been carefully removed and placed:  her shorts were discovered close to her elbow, her socks and hairband fifteen inches close to her head, her underwear was about 30 feet away from the body.  Her clothing was arranged in a neat manner.  Her shorts and underwear were not torn.
In the field nearby (about 70 feet away) police discovered a comb, two coke bottles, kleenex, and a half eaten hot dog.
The leaves and dirt around her body were undisturbed.
Three branches lay across her body; two were crossed over her chest in a V formation that framed her face.

My sources are:  Until You are Dead by Julian Sher, this document explaining the Ontario Court of Appeal's decision to exonerate Truscott, as well as this document detailing Truscott's 1967 appeal attempt (attached).

*which was notoriously mucked up in the Truscott investigation.  This, of course, confuses things.
   

I didn't write it in the Harper thread, but Sher notes that Lynne Harper's body seemed to be posed in a "funereal" way.

The other striking detail is this:  what's always bothered me about the Harper case is the fact that the killer apparently picked up Harper on the highway and then returned her body to Lawson's bush.  Why not place her body further from the pick up site?  Most killers do this.  This detail did not bode well for Truscott, especially given the fact that Harper was placed in a location that was frequently used as a biking trail for local youth--thus the whole "bicycle tire track" detail that seemed to gesture towards Truscott.  Barring Truscott (who I believe is innocent) the only answer I can think of is this:  the killer "got off" (sorry for the crude wording) on Lynne Harper being discovered.  The same may be said for Jacqueline Dunleavy.  As in the case of Harper, Dunleavy was discovered outside in a somewhat public area.  Arntfield writes:

Quote
The chosen dump-site, in an upscale area that was still relatively active in the winter, in spite of numerous more isolated areas nearby, suggests that the killer wanted the body to be found relatively quickly and that he was not afraid of operating out of doors or being seen.  He may have even banked on it.

It seems that Harper's killer took greater care with the scene, folding the clothing, etc.  In contrast, Jacqueline's clothing was torn and tossed around.  Perhaps, given the circumstances, the killer had more time to pose Lynne without being seen.  Also, I'm speculating, but perhaps Jacqueline, being a bit older, put up more of a fight. 

This is all just armchair spit balling, but, to sum up, I'm struck by these similarities:  the funereal posing, the scattered clothes, and the possibility that the killer in both case seemed to ensure the quick discovery of the bodies.

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