Unsolved Murders | Missing People Canada

Other Topics => Solved Cases => Topic started by: AlbertaCowboy on April 04, 2007, 06:42:30 PM

Title: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: AlbertaCowboy on April 04, 2007, 06:42:30 PM

The Candace Derksen Murder

On Friday, November 30, 1984, 13-year old Candace Derksen disappeared while walking home from school. Seven weeks later she was found frozen to death in an old machinery shed on some industrial land about 500 meters from her home.

Candace, a grade 7 student at the Mennonite Brethren Collegiate, was last seen by friends as she walked home alone from school shortly after 4:00 p.m. along Talbot Avenue. As she had an out of town friend coming to stay with her the following day, it was expected that she would come straight home after school to prepare for her friend?s arrival. As the walk from the school to her home would have taken about 20 minutes, it is believed that she would have been home sometime around 4:30 p.m. She never arrived.

Seven weeks later, on January 17, 1985, Candace?s body was found in an unused machinery shed on the property of Alsip?s Industrial Products on Cole Avenue. This property is located south of Talbot Avenue, near the Nairn Overpass, between the school and Candace?s home. Although the property now has a fence around it, in 1984 it was easily accessible by walking along a green space or the CPR rail line (and service road) that runs beneath the Nairn Overpass from Talbot Avenue.

It is believed that Candace had been in the shed since she went missing on November 30. However, since the shed contained only a few obsolete machinery parts and some old tools, it was never checked unless there was some need for one of the parts that it contained. As these parts were generally old and obsolete, the shed was never locked and was easily accessible. For this reason the shed was never checked the entire time Candace was missing and her body was not found until one of Alsip?s employees went looking for an old saw he believed may have been inside.

What he found instead was the body of Candace Derksen, her hands and feet had been tied behind her back with some thick rope, making it impossible for her to walk and nearly impossible to move.

Although the shed was on private property and rarely used by Alsip employees, because of its isolation yet easy accessibility it (and other sheds on the property) may have been used as a hangout by a few neighbourhood youths after the business closed at 4:30 p.m. and on weekends.

Although Talbot is a busy street no one saw Candace being abducted and it is possible that she knew the suspect, although threats of violence and the presence of a weapon by a stranger may have ensured her compliance and cooperation without drawing attention. However, it is believed that the suspect may have been a single white male, acting alone who was familiar with and/or lived in the area. He probably would have been a young adult at the time (30-40 years old today) and while he may have had an abnormal interest in bondage, he would not have stuck out from his peers at this time, although it is likely he has been arrested for offences in the intervening years.

Few clues were left behind at the scene, however it is possible that the suspect had darker hair that had been bleached at one time, was somewhat athletic, manipulative, possibly had interests in bizarre subjects, and lived in the area. The police are particularly interested in the names of any people who worked in the area or hung around the sheds of this industrial area on or before 1984.

If you have any information about this case, please contact Crime Stoppers at 786-TIPS (8477), or e-mail Sgt. Al Bradbury and Det. Jon Lutz of the Cold Case Homicide Unit.
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: Chris on May 16, 2007, 02:26:56 PM
A 43-year-old man has been arrested and charged in connection with the 1984 death of Winnipeg teenager Candace Derksen, police say.
http://www.cbc.ca/canada/manitoba/story/2007/05/16/candace-derksen.html

Mark Edward Grant was arrested Wednesday morning and charged with first-degree murder.

Candace Derksen, seen in an undated file photo, was found slain in a shed in Winnipeg.
(Family photo/CBC) 

Grant, classified as a dangerous offender by justice officials, has a lengthy criminal record with several convictions for assault and sexual assault, parole records indicate.

Derksen, 13, was last seen walking home from the Mennonite Brethren Collegiate in the East Kildonan area of Winnipeg in November 1984. Her frozen body was found seven weeks later in a shed in the same neighbourhood. Bound at the wrists and ankles, she died of exposure.

Police said they believed she had been in the the little-used machine shed owned by a manufacturing company since the day she disappeared.

The suspect was 21 at the time of Derksen's death and lived in the area.

Investigators said he was "known to police" and had been among the hundreds interviewed after Derksen's disappearance, but was not considered a suspect at the time.

Winnipeg police said Wednesday the break in the case came after the Derksen file was handed to investigators in the city's new cold case unit in 2006.

Mark Edward Grant, 43, has been classified a dangerous offender. He's charged with murder, some 23 years after the death of schoolgirl Candace Derksen.
(CBC)
Investigators declined to reveal details of the break, but said cold case detectives had noticed connections in notes in the case files that led them to identify suspects and submit forensic evidence to a private laboratory in Ontario.

The laboratory results led them to Grant, officers said.

Candace's parents, Wilma and Cliff Derksen, attended the police news conference where the suspect was identified.

"We are stunned at a few things: that the case has come to this point, and also that there is such huge interest in it," Cliff Derksen said.

"We had actually given up hope. We were already prepared to live with this mystery that has shadowed our family for so many years."

Both Derksens said they did not know Grant.

The Derksens said they felt both "anticipation and trepidation" about the progress in the case, as well as a renewed sense of sadness and loss over their daughter's death.
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: THUNDRCLOUD on May 17, 2007, 02:12:14 AM
Thu, May 17, 2007

Charge laid in Winnipeg cold caseSuspect deemed 'sexually deviant'
By CP

     
 

WINNIPEG -- National Parole Board documents indicate a man arrested in a 23-year-old cold case is a schizophrenic whose mind is filled with disturbing rape fantasies, lust for vulnerable teens and a hatred of women.

Mark Edward Grant, 43, was charged yesterday with first-degree murder in the death of Candace Derksen, a 13-year-old who was abducted off a busy street while she was walking home from school on Nov. 30, 1984.

Parole board documents obtained by the Winnipeg Free Press indicate Grant refused any type of treatment such as chemical castration that would have reduced his sexual urges.

Grant spent nearly 13 years in prison from 1991 to 2004, except for a nine-day stretch of parole when he raped another young woman.

Behind bars, Grant alluded to other sex crimes dating as far back as the 1970s for which he was never charged, but he never disclosed specific details nor mentioned Candace Derksen.

 

Justice officials had grave concern for the safety of any young woman who had contact with him.

"Your sexual/assaultive behaviour has resulted in serious harm to the victims. You have been predatory in your choice of victims, often looking for unsophisticated and vulnerable post-pubescent female children," the parole board wrote in revoking his parole in 1995.

"The board is satisfied that, if released, you are likely to commit an offence causing the death of, or serious harm to another person before the expiration of your sentence."

It noted Grant's self-reported "sexually deviant" behaviour that hadn't resulted in criminal charges including raping a drunk female stranger.

He linked his "hatred of women" to the behaviour of his mother and sister and being "victimized" as a child, but gave no specifics.

"You are considered to be more concerned about your own sexual gratification than you are about the consequences your offending causes to others," the parole board wrote in 2004.

"You admit your sexual gratification comes from the vulnerability of young women and children as 'they are so trusting.' "

Testing of Grant revealed an "elevated level of arousal to rape stimuli" with the highest peaks occurring "with material depicting inappropriate sexual contacts with children, predominantly to female."

Grant also described having "command hallucinations" which directed him to try and harm himself, or others.

He disclosed several failed suicide attempts and was diagnosed as schizophrenic.



Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: THUNDRCLOUD on May 17, 2007, 02:16:15 AM
I FIND THE ABOVE MOST CHILLING,
AND AWAKENS ME YET AGAIN, THAT THERE ARE THOSE THAT WALK AMONG US THAT ARE NOT WHAT THEY SEEM TO BE. AND WORST YET MAKES ME WANT TO LOCK MY DAUGHTER AWAY.
BIT EXTREME I KNOW BUT . THERE IS SOME BIG ISSUES WITH THE JUSTICE SYSTEM. IN THESE CASES.
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: Chris on May 18, 2007, 01:31:47 AM
Very interesting, he got out of jail and he was not being supervised or monitored? I too thought dangerous offenders could be held longer then there sentence mandated.
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: Adrian on May 18, 2007, 01:31:58 AM

This guy is quite interesting, and is worth the effort, for   LE, to look into it further, Maybe more unsolveds. Closure. We have had years, of missing and/or murdered.

Young children being exploited, and killed. The freaking pedophiles. If they are sadistic it often turns more tragic, as       they are fantasizing  about killing. It would be good to give these parents, of the young from the past, still unsolved.Arthur Shawcross was simular to this. guy.It must be devastating to wait day after day, after day, always wondering, what happened.
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: CraftyGal on May 18, 2007, 11:32:05 AM
Here is the History of the Dangerous Offendeers Act.  They are in the process of changing the Act under Bill C-27.  Here is the link: http://www.ccja-acjp.ca/en/c27en.html (http://www.ccja-acjp.ca/en/c27en.html)

Quote
History of Dangerous Offender Legislation

Canada first introduced legislation to deal with ?dangerous? offenders in 1947. Called The Habitual Offender Act, the legislation was designed to incapacitate offenders with lengthy criminal records by keeping them in prison and away from the general public (Jakimeic et.al.,1986). In 1948 a second piece of legislation, known as the Sexual Psychopath Act, was passed to ensure that dangerous sexual offenders would be identified and treated by mental health professionals (Petrunik, 1994). Once convicted of a designated sexual offence, the offender would be assessed by two psychiatrists, who would determine if the individual was ?dangerous?. A finding of sexual psychopathy would be accompanied by an indeterminate sentence, to be reviewed by the justice minister every three years for parole eligibility.

The term ?sexual psychopath? was very vague and not well defined in the legislation, lending uncertainty to the designation and making it difficult to meet the legal standard of proof ? beyond a reasonable doubt (McRuer, 1958, cited in Petrunik, 1994).  In 1960, the Dangerous Sexual Offender Act replaced the 1948 legislation and set out specific criteria for determining dangerousness including the offender?s criminal record and the circumstances of the current offence. Only one conviction for a designated sexual offence was necessary for a finding of dangerousness, and an application for a dangerousness hearing could be made up to three months post-release. A finding of dangerousness resulted in an indeterminate sentence that would be reviewed every three years.

In 1969 the report of the Canadian Committee on Corrections (Ouimet Report) found that the Habitual Offender and Dangerous Sexual Offender [statutes were] being applied erratically and ineffectively across the country. The Habitual Offender provisions were often used to indefinitely incarcerate repeat nuisance and property offenders and were not being reserved for those most dangerous to the public (Webster & Dickens, 1983) [while] the Dangerous Sexual Offender provisions were [often being] applied to those who had committed sexual offences but were not violent. On the other hand, some serious violent offenders who could be considered to be ?dangerous? on the basis of a demonstrated proclivity to commit a variety of serious personal injury offences were not being captured under either provision. The Ouimet Report did advise the continued use of clinical assessment and treatment for dangerous offenders, while the Law Commission of Canada disagreed and recommended against the use of indeterminate sentences and clinical assessments of dangerousness.

In 1977 new legislation was enacted, repealing both the Habitual Offender and Dangerous Sexual Offender Acts. The new Act was designed to be applicable to both sexual offenders and those who had committed violent acts of a non-sexual nature and provided for determinate or indeterminate sentences and parole eligibility after three years (Webster & Dickens, 1983).  The determination of dangerousness was to be made following conviction but prior to sentencing.  In 1988, legislation was put in place to allow the National Parole Board to detain offenders (who had not been designated as dangerous) past statutory release to the end of their sentence in the interests of public safety, if they felt that the individual was likely to re-offend in a violent or sexual manner.

In 1997, Bill C-55 was enacted, making significant changes to strengthen measures for dealing with the most serious offenders.  The Act  required the testimony of only one psychiatrist (rather than two) at a dangerousness hearing, lengthened the waiting period for parole eligibility to seven (rather than three) years, and rescinded the option of determinate sentences for offenders who had been declared dangerous.  The Act also created a second category of Long Term Offender, who would be subject to a determinate sentence followed by a post-release probationary period of up to ten years. Additionally, the Act extended the period in which application for a finding of dangerous may be made up to six month following the time of sentencing. Finally, of note, the 1997 legislation created a new category of judicial restraint (810.2) aimed at monitoring persons who are likely to commit a personal injury offence.

The 1997 legislation embodies the current provisions for addressing serious violent and sexual offenders.  Currently, any person convicted of a serious personal injury offence, but not yet sentenced who constitutes a danger to the life, safety, or mental/physical well-being of others may be subject to a dangerous offender application by the crown. The offence committed must be a violent offence that warrants a minimum 10 year sentence or a sexual offence as defined in sections 271 (sexual assault), 272 (sexual assault with a weapon or causing bodily harm) and 273 (aggravated sexual assault). The determination of dangerousness is to be based on evidence establishing: a pattern of unrestrained behaviour and/or, a pattern of persistent aggressive behaviour and/or, any behaviour that is of such a brutal nature that it can be inferred that the offender?s future behaviour is unlikely to be inhibited by normal restraint (Section 753 (1)(a). Behaviour that exhibits a failure to control sexual impulses that leads to harm to others is also grounds for a finding of dangerousness. If an individual  convicted of an offence subject to a minimum two year sentence meets the above criteria for dangerousness but it is determined that that the risk he poses to the public can be managed through intensive monitoring and various probation conditions including participation in treatment he can be found to be a Long-Term offender. In this case, he will receive a determinate sentence of two years or more plus up to ten years of community supervision.

Some information on Bill C-27:

Quote
History of Dangerous Offender Legislation

Canada first introduced legislation to deal with ?dangerous? offenders in 1947. Called The Habitual Offender Act, the legislation was designed to incapacitate offenders with lengthy criminal records by keeping them in prison and away from the general public (Jakimeic et.al.,1986). In 1948 a second piece of legislation, known as the Sexual Psychopath Act, was passed to ensure that dangerous sexual offenders would be identified and treated by mental health professionals (Petrunik, 1994). Once convicted of a designated sexual offence, the offender would be assessed by two psychiatrists, who would determine if the individual was ?dangerous?. A finding of sexual psychopathy would be accompanied by an indeterminate sentence, to be reviewed by the justice minister every three years for parole eligibility.

The term ?sexual psychopath? was very vague and not well defined in the legislation, lending uncertainty to the designation and making it difficult to meet the legal standard of proof ? beyond a reasonable doubt (McRuer, 1958, cited in Petrunik, 1994).  In 1960, the Dangerous Sexual Offender Act replaced the 1948 legislation and set out specific criteria for determining dangerousness including the offender?s criminal record and the circumstances of the current offence. Only one conviction for a designated sexual offence was necessary for a finding of dangerousness, and an application for a dangerousness hearing could be made up to three months post-release. A finding of dangerousness resulted in an indeterminate sentence that would be reviewed every three years.

In 1969 the report of the Canadian Committee on Corrections (Ouimet Report) found that the Habitual Offender and Dangerous Sexual Offender [statutes were] being applied erratically and ineffectively across the country. The Habitual Offender provisions were often used to indefinitely incarcerate repeat nuisance and property offenders and were not being reserved for those most dangerous to the public (Webster & Dickens, 1983) [while] the Dangerous Sexual Offender provisions were [often being] applied to those who had committed sexual offences but were not violent. On the other hand, some serious violent offenders who could be considered to be ?dangerous? on the basis of a demonstrated proclivity to commit a variety of serious personal injury offences were not being captured under either provision. The Ouimet Report did advise the continued use of clinical assessment and treatment for dangerous offenders, while the Law Commission of Canada disagreed and recommended against the use of indeterminate sentences and clinical assessments of dangerousness.

In 1977 new legislation was enacted, repealing both the Habitual Offender and Dangerous Sexual Offender Acts. The new Act was designed to be applicable to both sexual offenders and those who had committed violent acts of a non-sexual nature and provided for determinate or indeterminate sentences and parole eligibility after three years (Webster & Dickens, 1983).  The determination of dangerousness was to be made following conviction but prior to sentencing.  In 1988, legislation was put in place to allow the National Parole Board to detain offenders (who had not been designated as dangerous) past statutory release to the end of their sentence in the interests of public safety, if they felt that the individual was likely to re-offend in a violent or sexual manner.

In 1997, Bill C-55 was enacted, making significant changes to strengthen measures for dealing with the most serious offenders.  The Act  required the testimony of only one psychiatrist (rather than two) at a dangerousness hearing, lengthened the waiting period for parole eligibility to seven (rather than three) years, and rescinded the option of determinate sentences for offenders who had been declared dangerous.  The Act also created a second category of Long Term Offender, who would be subject to a determinate sentence followed by a post-release probationary period of up to ten years. Additionally, the Act extended the period in which application for a finding of dangerous may be made up to six month following the time of sentencing. Finally, of note, the 1997 legislation created a new category of judicial restraint (810.2) aimed at monitoring persons who are likely to commit a personal injury offence.
The 1997 legislation embodies the current provisions for addressing serious violent and sexual offenders.  Currently, any person convicted of a serious personal injury offence, but not yet sentenced who constitutes a danger to the life, safety, or mental/physical well-being of others may be subject to a dangerous offender application by the crown. The offence committed must be a violent offence that warrants a minimum 10 year sentence or a sexual offence as defined in sections 271 (sexual assault), 272 (sexual assault with a weapon or causing bodily harm) and 273 (aggravated sexual assault). The determination of dangerousness is to be based on evidence establishing: a pattern of unrestrained behaviour and/or, a pattern of persistent aggressive behaviour and/or, any behaviour that is of such a brutal nature that it can be inferred that the offender?s future behaviour is unlikely to be inhibited by normal restraint (Section 753 (1)(a). Behaviour that exhibits a failure to control sexual impulses that leads to harm to others is also grounds for a finding of dangerousness. If an individual  convicted of an offence subject to a minimum two year sentence meets the above criteria for dangerousness but it is determined that that the risk he poses to the public can be managed through intensive monitoring and various probation conditions including participation in treatment he can be found to be a Long-Term offender. In this case, he will receive a determinate sentence of two years or more plus up to ten years of community supervision.

Crafty
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: Chris on July 12, 2007, 08:05:06 PM
Hey AlbertaCowboy, were are you?? It's been a long time since you've been around.
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: babybear on July 27, 2007, 10:12:00 AM
I remember when Candace disappeared. It was a sad day for all her friends. None of it made sense for such a young vibrant girl who was so much loved to disappeared. When the news of her disappearance came my parents didn't let me walk home from school by myself. To be frank what happened to Candace scared me beyond belief.
When the word of her killer being caught and arrested I had been working in a campaign office during our provincial elections. I came home that night and I was tired. I sat down and turned on the news. What I saw before me knocked the wind out, I was staring at an old photo of Candace. I felt like I had just seen a ghost. Then I caught the announcement that they were making on the news. Candace's killer had been caught. I fell to my knees and started to cry. I praised my Father in heaven for bringing an arrest.
   Thank you Mr. Dehn for your constant persistence in the news. Thank you to the Winnipeg police for your persistance also in finding Candace's killer. Now she can rest in peace.
  But please how did mark Edward Grant get released. This is the time we need the death penalty not just for him but every sexual predator who murders children. These children are supposed to be our future.
  I can't wait for this sicko's trial. I plan on attending when I can. I hope he rots in jail.
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: Chris on July 29, 2007, 10:04:08 PM
Hi Babybear, thanks for joining.

So Candace was your friend? I am really sorry about your lose. It must have been a horrifying experience. I remember this case before he was arrested, it seemed to be rather cruel.

I am so glad too that the police went back and kept investigating. IT must have been a huge relief to everyone who knew her.

I have always been against the death penalty, but I am starting to be open to allowing it in special cases, especially murders of children. This was one of the saddest murders I ever read about.

I feel very confident that the police forces across Canada will be solving many old cases now with more funding, better training, and better technology. Cases like this help reinforce that it is important.

Again, thanks for joining.
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: AlbertaCowboy on September 07, 2007, 04:11:18 PM
I remember when Candace disappeared. It was a sad day for all her friends. None of it made sense for such a young vibrant girl who was so much loved to disappeared. When the news of her disappearance came my parents didn't let me walk home from school by myself. To be frank what happened to Candace scared me beyond belief.

I still remember this case, as I just turned 9 years old at the time.  It created paranoia among Winnipeggers.  I still remember police visiting my school as part of an education program to warn us the dangers of child abduction. 
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: AlbertaCowboy on September 07, 2007, 04:14:54 PM
Hey Cowboy,
Would like to hear from you about this case being solved!! You posted the case and I'm wondering what you think now that someone's been charged.



I am elated that this case is solved!  I hope Grant rots in hell for what he did. 
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: Chris on September 07, 2007, 04:16:17 PM
LOL!
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: AlbertaCowboy on September 30, 2007, 11:21:03 AM
Thanks, Des.  It is getting better.  Hopefully I will be able to work at my job again, although I've been keeping somewhat busy working as a phone canvasser for the Heart & Stroke Foundation for the last month just to support myself. 

I'm glad they locked up that monster responsible for her murder.  I still remember the fear he created in the Winnipeg area when she was found.  I was 9 at the time, and a couple of police officers came to my school a couple of weeks later telling us about the dangers of hanging out with strangers in assembly.
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: Sleuth on June 17, 2009, 06:44:43 PM
Another one for the good guys! Unfortunately I was unable to upload a pic of the killer.

Arrest made in 1984 killing of Winnipeg teen
Last Updated: Wednesday, May 16, 2007 | 2:41 PM CT
CBC News

A 43-year-old man has been arrested and charged in connection with the 1984 death of Winnipeg teenager Candace Derksen, police say.

Mark Edward Grant was arrested Wednesday morning and charged with first-degree murder.

Grant, classified as a dangerous offender by justice officials, has a lengthy criminal record with several convictions for assault and sexual assault, court documents indicate.

Derksen, 13, was last seen walking home from the Mennonite Brethren Collegiate in the East Kildonan area of Winnipeg in November 1984. Her frozen body was found seven weeks later in a shed in the same neighbourhood. Bound at the wrists and ankles, she died of exposure.

Police said they believed she had been in the the little-used machine shed owned by a manufacturing company since the day she disappeared.

The suspect was 21 at the time of Derksen's death and lived in the area.

Investigators said he was "known to police" and had been among the hundreds interviewed after Derksen's disappearance, but was not considered a suspect at the time.

Winnipeg police said Wednesday the break in the case came after the Derksen file was handed to investigators in the city's new cold case unit in 2006.

  Investigators declined to reveal details of the break, but said cold case detectives had noticed connections in notes in the case files that led them to identify suspects and submit forensic evidence to a private laboratory in Ontario.

The laboratory results led them to Grant, officers said.

Candace's parents, Wilma and Cliff Derksen, attended the police news conference where the suspect was identified.

"We are stunned at a few things: that the case has come to this point, and also that there is such huge interest in it," Cliff Derksen said.

"We had actually given up hope. We were already prepared to live with this mystery that has shadowed our family for so many years."

Both Derksens said they did not know Grant.

The Derksens said they felt both "anticipation and trepidation" about the progress in the case, as well as a renewed sense of sadness and loss over their daughter's death.
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: Chris on June 19, 2009, 03:41:31 AM
Yeah that was good news! those guys who thought they got away with it and then get busted decades later... that is just wonderful. Must be twice as hard to be arrested then.
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: t-lynne on January 16, 2011, 08:48:23 AM
WINNIPEG - Her killing haunted Winnipeggers for decades, a 'cold case' whose secrets many feared would never be revealed.

Now, 26 years later, a trial is set to begin for the man police and prosecutors allege killed 13-year-old Candace Derksen.

Mark Edward Grant, 46, is charged with first-degree murder.

Derksen disappeared while walking home from Mennonite Brethren Collegiate on Nov. 30, 1984, sparking a massive search effort.

The search ended Jan. 17, 1985, when an Alsip's Industrial Products employee found Derksen's frozen body in a rarely-used tool shed near the Nairn Avenue overpass, about 500 metres from her home. Her hands and feet were bound behind her back, making it impossible for her to escape. She died of exposure.

Police arrested Grant in 2007 after he submitted a blood sample to the national data bank. Grant was interviewed by police in the during the initial investigation into Derksen's disappearance, but was not deemed to be a suspect at he time.

Wilma and Cliff Derksen told QMI Agency in 2007 that they had come to terms with the fact they may never find out what happened to their daughter. Grant's arrest nearly four years ago shook their world.

"Wilma and I have to admit that we had actually given up hope. We were already prepared to live with this mystery that has shadowed our family for so many years," Cliff Derksen said, reading from a statement, after police confirmed they had a high-risk sex offender in custody for the 1984 slaying.

The case touched many Winnipegers, including the officers charged with finding Derksen's killer.

"It's been a very, very disturbing case. It still haunts a lot of people," former police Chief Jack Ewatski, a homicide investigator at the time of the murder, told QMI Agency in 2001. "Every time I drive over the Nairn overpass, it brings back memories.

"To me, she died a horrible death knowing her cries for help were going unanswered. She must have felt very hopeless and very alone."

Grant was committed to stand trial following a preliminary hearing in 2009.

Jury selection was completed earlier this month. The trial is set to last a month.

The Crown is expected to call 34 witnesses, including three DNA scientists.

Jurors are expected to hear their first witness on Thursday.





Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: t-lynne on January 16, 2011, 08:54:27 AM
I am thinking somebody should just tie this 'monster' up and leave him to die in the cold...I am shocked that he could even live with himself for 26 years knowing that he left that little girl, bound,hurt, scared, cold.... 500 METERS from her home!!!  BASTARD!! (sorry for the expletive) but OMG!!
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: AlbertaCowboy on January 17, 2011, 06:14:36 PM
Finally!

26 years to the day Candace Derksen's remains were found in a tool shed just south of the Nairn Overpass in Winnipeg, the main suspect Mark Edward Grant is finally put on trail for the killing.

http://www.ctv.ca/CTVNews/TopStories/20110117/man-goes-on-trial-for-1984-murder-110117/ (http://www.ctv.ca/CTVNews/TopStories/20110117/man-goes-on-trial-for-1984-murder-110117/)

The trail is expected to last until late February.
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: capeheart on January 17, 2011, 07:00:59 PM
I saw this on the Global News this evening and am very happy that this case was solved. What a monster to do this to this young girl. The horrible death, but finally closure after all these years for her mom and dad. RIP Candice Derksen, and there will finally be justice in your loss of life in such a violent manner. ::) ::) ::) :o :o :o
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: t-lynne on January 20, 2011, 08:39:07 PM
DNA to be key factor in 26-year-old murder case
By DEAN PRITCHARD, QMI Agency

Last Updated: January 20, 2011 6:32pm
.WINNIPEG - It's been 26 years since Candace Derksen was left to die in a tool shed on a cold Winnipeg night.

But the passage of time doesn't mean the case against her accused killer is a complex one, a jury was told Thursday.

"The evidence is fairly straight-forward," Crown attorney Mike Himmelman said in his opening address to jurors in the first-degree murder trial of Mark Grant.

Derksen, 13, disappeared while walking home from Mennonite Brethren Collegiate on Nov. 30, 1984. Her frozen body was discovered Jan. 17, 1985 in a tool shed at Alsip's Industrial Products, near the Nairn Avenue overpass.

Himmelman alleged Derksen was still alive when Grant bound her hands and ankles together behind her back and abandoned her in the tool shed. The temperature that night dropped to -25 C.

Because Derksen died while being confined, her death is first-degree murder, Himmelman told jurors. He alleged Grant's DNA was found on the twine used to bind Derksen's limbs. Several hairs found at the scene were later identified as belonging to Grant, Himmelman said.

Retired Winnipeg Police Service sergeant Murray Allan was among several identification unit officers called to the scene after the discovery of Derksen's body.

"She was frozen stiff," he testified.

Allan said police seized several items from the scene, including a gym bag and three chewed pieces of gum. Two logs found in the shed were sent to the RCMP hair and fibre section for analysis.

Allan said days later he and another officer returned to the scene, where Allan bound the other officer in the same fashion Derksen had been found.

"He was able to roll around on his back and his front and his side, (but) he was unable to stand up," Allan said.

Already, the trial is promising to hinge on a battle over DNA.

Court heard the Derksen case was the first time the identification unit assumed responsibility for a crime scene investigation. Defence lawyer Saull Simmonds questioned what police did to protect the crime scene from contamination.

"You weren't in a position at that stage that the preservation of DNA was even a consideration," Simmonds said.

Simmonds said Allan or other officers could have contaminated the scene by "coughing, sneezing, or blowing (their) noses" over Derksen's body. Allan conceded it was possible.

Allan also confirmed identification officers did not then wear the same protective clothing at crime scenes that they do now, such as boot coverings, coveralls and hairnets.

Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: jellybean on January 23, 2011, 11:36:38 AM

A first-degree murder trial for a man accused in one of Manitoba's most notorious homicide cases began Monday in a Winnipeg courtroom.
Hearings begin on 26th anniversary of discovery of girl's body
Last Updated: Monday, January 17, 2011 | 7:04 AM CST
CBC News



Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/canada/manitoba/story/2011/01/16/man-trial-derksen-grant-day-one-advancer.html#ixzz1BsgZaKCQ (http://www.cbc.ca/canada/manitoba/story/2011/01/16/man-trial-derksen-grant-day-one-advancer.html#ixzz1BsgZaKCQ)

Mark Edward Grant, 46, has pleaded not guilty to killing schoolgirl Candace Derksen more than 20 years ago.

Derksen's mother, Wilma, told CBC News on Monday that the trial is "an unbelievable gift" because the family always wanted to know what happened and why.

They have always tried to find meaning in Derksen's death, rather than fight for justice, Wilma said.

"It's the big question: what happened? And why? Why Candace?" she said.

"I don't know if we'll ever have any of these answered, but I think it's the quest for knowledge and understanding right now that will keep me going."

Derksen was 13 when she vanished while walking to her East Kildonan home from the Mennonite Brethren Collegiate on the afternoon of Nov. 30, 1984.

Her disappearance triggered a massive search that ended on Jan. 17, 1985, when her body was found — wrapped in blankets and with hands and feet bound — in a rarely used supply shed near the Nairn Overpass.

    'I want to visit Candace's grave and just close it, no matter what happens.'—Wilma Derksen

Police said she died of exposure but considered her death a homicide.

The shed where the body was found was less than half a kilometre from the Derksen family home.

Despite an intensive police investigation at the time, the case languished until the file was assigned to a newly formed cold case unit within the Winnipeg Police Service in 2006.

Investigators reviewed the file and garnered new leads resulting in Grant's arrest in May 2007. He was committed to stand trial in the Court of Queen's Bench in the fall of 2009.

Wilma said she never expected to see this day after the case went cold.

"We gave up hope almost immediately because there just didn't seem to be any clues — nothing, nothing made sense to us," she said. "I think one, two years [after Derksen's death] we gave up hope of ever knowing.

"So this is just amazing that we even have hope of knowing anything."

Timeline of the Candace Derksen case

    * Nov. 13, 1984 — Candace Derksen, 13, fails to arrive at home after school. A missing persons report is filed and police and community members begin actively searching for her.
    * Jan. 17, 1985 — Derksen's body is found in a shed less than 500 metres from her home. A homicide investigation is opened and police begin interviewing potential suspects. No arrests are made.
    * April 1985 — Wilma Derksen incorporates Child Find Manitoba. The group provides services to families that didn't exist when Candace disappeared.
    * 2006 — The homicide probe is turned over to a new Winnipeg police unit investigating cold cases. Police say new leads are established and pursued and the investigation is given the official title of Project Angel.
    * May 25, 2006 — The Canadian Centre for Child Protection is formed.
    * May 16, 2007 — Winnipeg police Chief Jack Ewatski and Insp. Tom Legge announce the arrest of Mark Edward Grant.
    * Aug. 24, 2009 — Grant pleads not guilty and his preliminary hearing begins in provincial court.
    * Sept. 15, 2009 — Grant is formally indicted on a charge of first-degree murder. He remains in custody.
    * Jan. 6, 2011 — 12 jurors and two alternates are selected for Grant's trial.
    * Jan. 17, 2011 — Grant's trial begins, 26 years to the day after Derksen's body was found.

No testimony is expected in the first few days of the six-week-long trial as Crown and defence lawyers argue several preliminary motions in the absence of jurors.

A publication ban prohibits the publication of any information given at those hearings.

The teen's mysterious disappearance sent ripples of fear through the city, and later waves of grief through her family after her body was discovered.

In its wake, Wilma began advocating for greater resources for families of missing kids. She also wrote books on her family's search for answers.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/canada/manitoba/story/2011/01/16/man-trial-derksen-grant-day-one-advancer.html#ixzz1Bsg8vRwM (http://www.cbc.ca/canada/manitoba/story/2011/01/16/man-trial-derksen-grant-day-one-advancer.html#ixzz1Bsg8vRwM)
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: debbiec on January 24, 2011, 11:33:04 AM
By DEAN PRITCHARD, QMI Agency

Last Updated: January 22, 2011 3:38am

 
Candace Derksen. WINNIPEG - Thirteen-year-old Candace Derksen may have remained alive up to 24 after she was tied up and abandoned in a freezing tool shed 27 years ago, but she likely didn't suffer any pain, a jury heard Friday.

"She lost consciousness pretty fast but it may have been hours before she died," said retired chief medical examiner Dr. Peter Markesteyn.

Markesteyn was testifying at the first-degree murder trial of Mark Grant.

Derksen disappeared while walking home from Mennonite Brethren Collegiate in Winnipeg on Nov. 30, 1984. Her frozen body was discovered Jan. 17, 1985, in a tool shed at Alsip's Industrial Products.

Her wrists and ankles had been tied behind her back.

Markesteyn said Derksen died of hypothermia as the result of exposure.

Even before losing consciousness, Derksen would not have suffered any pain, Markesteyn said.

"There is no pain because the pain receptors no longer function," he said. "That is a sign things are getting worse, not better."

Markesteyn said there were no signs Derksen had been sexually assaulted.

Swelling to her hands indicated Derksen was alive when she was tied up, Markesteyn said.

Derksen suffered "considerable injuries" to her knees, Markesteyn said.

"Her knees were the only site of injury," he said. "It would suggest she was on her knees in an environment that caused injury."

Red splotches on Derksen's hand were "very consistent with bite marks of mice," Markesteyn said. "They are definitely post-mortem."

Classmate David Wiebe was among the last people to see Derksen alive. Wiebe, then 15, met Derksen the previous summer at Bible camp.

"She was a fun, vibrant kid," Wiebe testified. "It was just fun being around her."

Wiebe said she and Derksen had a snowball fight at school the afternoon she disappeared. Wiebe said he would have walked her home, but he had a driver's ed class.

Within days, police were treating Wiebe like a suspect, court heard.

One officer "kept giving me a lot of hope, saying 'We are going to have Candace home before midnight,'" Wiebe said. "I said, 'How do you know that?' He said, 'Because you are going to get in the car and show me where she is.'"

In 2007, prior to Grant's arrest, police asked Wiebe to take a polygraph test.

"I said if I were the Derksens, I'd probably want people to be as co-operative as possible, so I said 'Yeah, I'll do it.'"

dean.pritchard@sunmedica.ca

A MOTHER'S ANGUISH

Excerpts from police statement of Wilma Derksen, taken Jan. 23, 1985

"I was home by 3:30 in the afternoon and just before 4 o'clock I received the phone call from Candace ... When we spoke on the phone Candace fi rst said 'Hi mom' and then she giggled. She told me Dave had just given her a face wash in the snow and she seemed happy. She asked me to pick her up at school ... I told Candace that I couldn't pick her up because I was having problems with the two younger children ... Shortly after that Candace phoned back and I asked her to walk home ... She defi nitely wasn't upset about not getting a ride ...

"I started cleaning up and (didn't) realize the time until about 4:40. I became concerned when Candace hadn't shown up as yet and I bundled up the two younger children ... We drove the route Candace takes home and ... were watching for Candace but didn't see her. We stopped at the school and I checked the doors to fi nd they were locked. I quickly picked up Cli_ and we backtracked Candace's normal route home again ...

"I was looking for David Wiebe, the boy who washed Candace's face. When I got to the school ... I introduced myself and asked him if he knew where Candace was. He said he didn't know and that he thought she went home ... I told him Candace wasn't home yet and he said that was terrible and he tried to comfort me because I was already starting to show emotion ...

"I think it was shortly before 7 o'clock after all my leads were exhausted that we phoned the police ... After that I stayed at home and prayed mostly ... Some time between 10 and 11 Cli_ went out for a walk. It was sort of a frantic search on his part by then."


http://www.torontosun.com/news/canada/2011/01/22/16990481.html (http://www.torontosun.com/news/canada/2011/01/22/16990481.html)
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: debbiec on January 24, 2011, 11:33:59 AM
By: Staff Writer

Posted: 01/24/2011 9:41 AM

Testimony is expected today from the owner of property where the 13-year-old Derksen's body found, and from more police officers involved in early stages of the investigation.

Mark Edwart Grant, 47, has pleaded not guilty to first-degree murder in Derksen's 1984 death.

Grant wasn't arrested until 2007 after DNA found at the crime scene was linked to him through advanced testing techniques.

Derksen was allegedly grabbed off the street on Nov. 30, 1984, bound with rope and left to freeze to death inside a shed. Her body was found on Jan. 17, 1985, following an exhaustive search that included hundreds of volunteers.


http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/breakingnews/Derksen-trial-continues-114484394.html (http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/breakingnews/Derksen-trial-continues-114484394.html)
 
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: debbiec on January 25, 2011, 10:15:34 AM
Defence in sensational Winnipeg cold-case murder trial targets DNA evidence
 
 
By Mike McIntyre, Winnipeg Free Press January 25, 2011 5:29 AM


But the first-degree murder case against Mark Grant may prove to be anything but routine as his lawyers work to raise a doubt about the validity of the forensic evidence.

Grant, 47, has pleaded not guilty to the November 1984 slaying of 13-year-old Candace Derksen, who vanished while walking home from her school in the Winnipeg neighbourhood of Elmwood. Her frozen, hog-tied body was found in January 1985 inside a storage shed at a brickyard less than two kilometres away.

A clear pattern has been established through cross-examination of the 11 witnesses who have testified against Grant since the case began last week. Defence lawyer Saul Simmonds has made a concerted effort to attack the evidence which led to his client being arrested in 2007, citing a spoiled crime scene, sloppy police work and the erosion of memories through the passage of time.

Three pubic hairs linked to Grant were found on or near Derksen's body, although police have said she wasn't sexually assaulted. Four scalp hairs that appear to have been lightly bleached near the roots were on Derksen's clothing. As well, DNA linked to Grant was found on the twine used to bind her.

On Monday, Simmonds asked a flurry of questions of witnesses which themselves raised a number of questions, including the possibility Grant once worked at the business where Derksen's body was found.

Frank Alsip, the owner of Alsip's Building Products and Services Ltd., testified he has no memory of ever employing Grant but admitted personnel records have long since been destroyed. Alsip said "it's possible" Grant could have spent some time on the property, which could explain why strands of his hair were found inside the shed near Derksen's body.

Alsip also told jurors under cross-examination that the City of Winnipeg was storing hundreds of sandbags on his property, all bound with twine. Alsip said he has no idea who might have had access to the bags and twine, which is similar to what was used to confine Derksen.

Alsip said his property wasn't fully fenced in, didn't have surveillance cameras and often saw unwelcome visitors walking through. He said the shed where Derksen was found had an insecure door that had broken off its hinges years earlier but was never repaired.

"Unfortunately people were free to come and go as they chose, weren't they?" said Simmonds.

The same line of questioning was put to several police officers who attended the scene. Every Crown witness to date has had no memory of a previous meeting with Grant, which would seem to rule out the possibility of an inadvertent transfer of DNA evidence. But defence lawyers appear to be leaving that door open by asking specific questions of officers about whether they can recall every person they encountered, meal they ate at and movie they watched in the weeks preceding the investigation. None could, of course.

Last week, retired officer Ronald Allan admitted the crime scene could have been "contaminated" because investigators had no way of knowing at the time of scientific advances that were to come, allowing for forensic testing that would lead them to Grant more than two decades later.

Several officers walked through the shed and surrounding area, not wearing any protective clothing, masks or hair nets, as they collected about 40 exhibits, Allan told jurors. He couldn't say how many different sets of hands touched the twine from which Grant's DNA was ultimately extracted using advanced scientific techniques.

Simmonds asked Allan whether officers at the scene that day could have "coughed, sneezed ... scratched themselves" while searching for evidence.

Allan said it was possible, but the passage of time means there is no way to precisely remember.

The trial is set to continue on Wednesday afternoon.

mike.mcintyrefreepress@mb.ca


Read more: http://www.globalwinnipeg.com/world/Defence+sensational+Winnipeg+cold+case+murder+trial+targets+evidence/4162036/story.html#ixzz1C3zhQCys (http://www.globalwinnipeg.com/world/Defence+sensational+Winnipeg+cold+case+murder+trial+targets+evidence/4162036/story.html#ixzz1C3zhQCys)
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: Chris on January 26, 2011, 12:42:52 AM
How can pubic hairs end up contaminating something? Did he have a habit of pulling out his # in weird places?
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: debbiec on January 27, 2011, 06:14:53 PM
'Dozens of hairs' found with Derksen
By DEAN PRITCHARD, Winnipeg Sun
Last Updated: January 27, 2011 5:14pm


Police examined dozens of hairs retrieved from Candace Derksen’s clothing and other items in hopes of identifying her killer, jurors heard Thursday.

Donald Ogilvie, a former RCMP hair and fibre analyst, told court he catalogued and examined dozens of hairs found on Derksen’s jacket, jeans, sock and a shroud police used to wrap her body. Hair was also found on a log seized from the shed where her frozen body was discovered Jan. 17, 1985.

Ogilvie said he separated seven hairs based on their “similarities.” Derksen, 13, disappeared while walking home from Mennonite Brethren Collegiate on Nov. 30, 1984. Her body was discovered six weeks later in a tool shed at Alsip’s Industrial Products, near the Nairn Avenue overpass. Her wrists and ankles had been tied behind her back.

Mark Grant, 47, has pleaded not guilty to first-degree murder.

Grant’s lawyer Saul Simmonds continued to cast doubt on how police seized and examined the items, suggesting the evidence chain was quickly contaminated.

Ogilvie admitted he might not have been wearing gloves when he examined the twine used to bind Derksen’s limbs. He also said he could not remember whether he coughed or sneezed on the items, possibly contaminating them.

Pamela Dixon, an RCMP DNA analyst, told court she was tasked with extracting DNA from the same twine and other items in 2001 and 2002. She said the DNA extracted was measured in nanograms, or billionths of a gram.

Dixon said she would not be able to tell if a DNA sample had been contaminated before examining it.

http://www.winnipegsun.com/news/winnipeg/2011/01/27/17054296.html (http://www.winnipegsun.com/news/winnipeg/2011/01/27/17054296.html)
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: debbiec on January 31, 2011, 12:44:10 PM
By: Bruce Owen

Posted: 01/31/2011 11:49 AM

WINNIPEG - Free Press reporter Bruce Owen is reporting live from the the Candace Derksen murder trial Monday as the jury hears more testimony about how DNA evidence can be inadvertently contaminated by police.

The focus is on twine recovered by police from a shed where Derksen was found dead in January 1985. The 13-year-old had been tied up and froze to death after vanishing on her way home from school several weeks earlier.

Mark Grant, 47, has pleaded not guilty to first-degree murder.

Court heard this morning from RCMP employee Tod Christianson. In early 2001 he worked at the RCMP lab in Winnipeg, and processed twine for DNA testing by an RCMP lab in Ottawa.

He said he cut the twine up and sealed it in seven large-scale extraction tubes.

Under cross-exam by Grant's lawyer Saul Simmonds, Christianson said it was possible the twine and other seized items like gum could be contaminated by someone else's DNA.

However, he said incidental contamination can be detected in the lab, and separated from a DNA profile of someone who had major contact with an item being tested, like a firearm.


Grant's trial continues through the week.

Candace Derksen, 13, vanished while walking home from school Nov. 30, 1984. Her frozen, hog-tied body was found Jan. 17, 1985 inside a storage shed at a brickyard less than two kilometres away.

The case is largely built around material found at the crime scene, specifically seven hairs and a 14-foot long piece of twine, which ultimately led police to Grant in 2007 due to advances in forensic science.

To follow Bruce Owen's live coverage, join the Cover It Live event below.

bruce.owen@freepress.mb.ca


http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/breakingnews/Derksen-trial-hears-testimony-about-DNA-evidence-114942944.html (http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/breakingnews/Derksen-trial-hears-testimony-about-DNA-evidence-114942944.html)
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: debbiec on February 02, 2011, 11:35:21 AM
By: Bruce Owen

Posted: 02/2/2011 1:00 AM

Each on their own perhaps wouldn't have meant that much, but taken together they helped city police zero in on a suspect in the 1984 disappearance and slaying of 13-year-old Candace Derksen, the jury in Mark Grant's murder trial heard Tuesday.

Sgt. Jon Lutz testified that on Nov. 23, 2006 -- almost 22 years after Derksen vanished -- he sent seven hairs found in the wooden shed where she died to a private lab in Thunder Bay, Ont.

The lab specialized in mitochondrial DNA testing; meaning it could develop a DNA profile from hair, he said. The RCMP crime lab at the time didn't do this kind of specialized testing.

Under questioning from Crown attorney Brian Bell, Lutz told court the hairs were recovered from Derksen's jacket, kangaroo sweater, right sock and on a stump that was inside the shed.

"I thought it was kind of strange that they were all over the place," Lutz told the five-woman, seven-man jury.

The results of that analysis narrowed the police service's reopened investigation of the Derksen case, said Lutz, a former member of the police service's cold case unit.

Officers also looked at convicted killer Stanley Pomfret as a possible suspect, Lutz added. Pomfret killed Tena Franks and raped two other girls in the early 1990s, but he was ruled out as a suspect in the Derksen case. He provided a DNA sample to police in the cold case investigation.

Police also sent Grant's hair sample for testing in early January 2007, and got a result about two weeks later. It was not explained in court why police had Grant's hair on file.

"We decided we needed to start a short-term task force," Lutz said, adding Grant was the target.

Grant, 47, has pleaded not guilty to first-degree murder in Derksen's death. Derksen vanished while walking home from school Nov. 30, 1984. Her frozen body was found Jan. 17, 1985 inside the shed located at a brickyard less than two kilometres away. She had been tied up and apparently left to freeze to death.

The investigation of Grant also included police setting up a special surveillance unit in order to obtain a "discarded DNA sample," Lutz said.

Besides the hair, other items were also sent for forensic testing, including twine and a chip bag found in the shed.

Court will hear more testimony about the police investigation and the DNA evidence over the next week.

bruce.owen@freepress.mb.ca


Republished from the Winnipeg Free Press print edition February 2, 2011 B3

http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/hairs-helped-guide-police-to-suspect-in-killing-115086759.html (http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/hairs-helped-guide-police-to-suspect-in-killing-115086759.html)
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: debbiec on February 04, 2011, 02:02:49 PM
LIVE: Candace Derksen murder trial
By: Staff Writer
Posted: 02/4/2011 9:47 AM

WINNIPEG — Jurors in the Candace Derksen murder trial will hear more evidence today on DNA evidence linking accused Mark Edward Grant to the alleged crime.

The trial heard Thursday that seven hairs found in the shed where Candace died were linked through DNA analysis to Grant.

Curtis Hildebrandt, a senior scientist with Molecular World in Thunder Bay, Ont., will be cross-examined by Grant's lawyer Saul Simmonds this morning.

Hildebrandt testified on Thursday that seven hairs found in the shed where Candace died in 1985 matched the mitochondrial DNA profiles of Grant and his siblings. Mitochondrial DNA is passed to children exclusively from the mother so that all children of the same mother have the same mitochondrial DNA.

Candace went missing Nov. 30, 1984 while walking home from school at the Mennonite Brethren Collegiate Institute. Her frozen body was found Jan. 17, 1985 inside a shed located at a brickyard less than two kilometres away from her Elmwood home. She had been bound with rope and froze to death.

When police examined the shed and Candace's clothing for forensic evidence they recovered seven hairs. One of the hairs was found on a log stump inside the shed and the others on her jacket, kangaroo sweater, right sock and a blanket used to cover her body.

Hildebrandt of Molecular World -- it's now owned by Warnex -- said he tested the hairs in November 2006 and developed mitochondrial DNA profiles from each one.

Hildebrandt also said he obtained mitochondrial DNA profiles from a hair sample Grant supplied to the lab by Winnipeg police. Police also supplied the lab with a blood sample from Grant.

Arlene Lahti, a former senior scientist with Molecular World, said she processed DNA samples from 10 individuals, including seven of Grant's brothers and sisters, his ex-girlfriend Audrey Fontaine, convicted killer-rapist Stanley Pomfret (police considered him a potential suspect) and Derksen's school friend David Wiebe.

The lab found that Fontaine's, Pomfret's and Wiebe's DNA did not match the DNA of Grant, his siblings and the hair found in the shed, the jury was told.

bruce.owen@freepress.mb.ca

http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/breakingnews/LIVE-Candace-Derksen-murder-trial-115282319.html (http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/breakingnews/LIVE-Candace-Derksen-murder-trial-115282319.html)
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: AlbertaCowboy on February 04, 2011, 11:31:24 PM
I'm so glad the Derksen family may finally find justice after all these years.  They must be strong people, staying together after enduring a tragedy like that.
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: debbiec on February 09, 2011, 10:58:42 AM
Last Updated: Tuesday, February 8, 2011 | 3:00 PM CST
The Canadian Press
 
A small amount of degraded DNA from 26-year-old evidence that links linking Mark Edward Grant to the 1984 death of Candace Derksen is under attack by the man's defence lawyer.

Amarjit Chahal, the scientist who reviewed the DNA profiles in the case, has already testified there is one-in-50-million chance the evidence found on Derksen's body was not Grant's.
 
To put that in perspective, you'd have a three or four times better chance of winning a 6/49 jackpot than the DNA being from someone else. But throughout the trial, defence lawyer Saul Simmonds has been questioning the reliability of the DNA evidence in this case, and he continued Tuesday during his cross examination of Chahal.

Simmonds challenged the credibility of the lab which did the tests. Although Molecular World in Thunder Bay, Ont., works with police forces from across Canada, Simmonds noted it has done no independent work on the reliability of results from degraded DNA.

Very small amounts of degraded DNA were obtained from the twine used to bind Derksen, a 13-year-old girl who disappeared on her way home from school at the end of November 1984. Her frozen body was found six weeks later in a brickyard shed.

Simmonds noted that Chahal was unable to find all the markers he was looking for in the sample obtained from the twine. The scientist acknowledged he found only 10 of the 15 markers he was seeking.
 
"What you don't indicate is that a partial profile is at risk of being incomplete and misleading," Simmonds said.

Chahal did not agree.

"If it was misleading, then we would have guidelines in place that no partial profiles be included," he said, suggesting that rather than being misleading, it meant one had to adjust the probabilities when interpreting the results.

DNA also was obtained from seven hairs isolated from the 100 or more found on Derksen's body using three different tests.

A few years earlier a single test for nuclear DNA the RCMP had conducted on the twine was inconclusive.

Simmonds recounted the long list of police officers and experts who touched all the evidence over the years and did not provide samples of their DNA so it could be excluded from results.

He also questioned why Chahal had looked at Grant's DNA before he looked at the unknown sample and then matched it to Grant.

"Before you look at the final sample that you are going to base everything on, you have already looked at Mr. Grant's sample," Simmonds charged.

© The Canadian Press, 2011

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/manitoba/story/2011/02/08/mb-dna-derksen-murder-trial-winnipeg.html (http://www.cbc.ca/canada/manitoba/story/2011/02/08/mb-dna-derksen-murder-trial-winnipeg.html)
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: AlbertaCowboy on February 12, 2011, 10:53:35 PM
IMHO, it will be a travesty and a miscarriage of justice if Grant is convicted of anything other than First degree murder.

Grant has lied from day one, and some of his answers to questions have been unreal.  For example:

When asked if he heard about the Candace Derksen case, he replied "No."  The case was the most well known missing persons case in the history of Winnipeg.  Everyone that was born before 1980 has to know about this case.  He was 21 at the time, and living near where she was abducted.

Secondly, he claimed never to have heard of the Nairn Overpass.  Everyone in the city knows where the Nairn Overpass is, as it is one of Winnipeg's most well known infrastructure landmark.  He lived in Winnipeg his whole life, lived blocks away from the overpass, and claims he never heard of it???

Finally, he was living in a tent beside the Higgins Avenue CPR tracks, a 5 minute car ride from where Candace was abducted.  He was living with a 13 year old girl at the time.  He had a lengthy history of sex crimes, to the point of being declared a dangerous offender. 
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: AlbertaCowboy on February 17, 2011, 06:19:53 AM
Jurors consider verdict in Derksen trial
By: Mike McIntyre

Posted: 02/16/2011 7:22 PM


(http://media.winnipegfreepress.com/images/240*392/2849817.jpg)

Jurors have started deliberations in the Candace Derksen case.

Crown and defence lawyers gave them plenty to think about after summarizing the high-profile trial during closing arguments earlier today. Queen’s Bench Justice Glenn Joyal then gave final instructions on the law before they were given the case around 5 p.m. The seven-man, five-woman jury will now remain sequestered until they reach a verdict.  Grant was arrested in 2007 after advances in DNA testing allowed for material seized at the scene to be tied to his genetic profile.

Defence lawyer Saul Simmonds began his final statement Wednesday by accusing justice officials of putting "bad science" before a jury. He said police ignored certain evidence that pointed away from Grant, contaminated the original crime scene and mishandled key exhibits such as the twine used to tie Candace up.  "You must have been wondering for weeks where is the evidence, how did we get here?" he told jurors. "This is a case with overwhelming doubt."

He suggested the real killer has never been caught and what really happened to Candace remains an unsolved mystery.  "What happened in that shed? Was it a prank? Was it a game played by some that ended tragically? Was she taken by someone? Those answers we will never know," said Simmonds.

He argued that police "went down every rabbit hole they could" in trying to make the evidence fit against Grant.  "Your responsibility is to protect him from a possible wrongful conviction. He is not the person who did this. His future now rests in your hands," said Simmonds.

Crown attorney Brian Bell told a vastly different story, telling jurors they should have no difficulty finding Grant guilty as charged. He said DNA evidence clearly connects Grant to the slaying, with only a 1 in 50 million chance the genetic profile is from someone else. He said there is no reasonable explanation of how Grant’s DNA could be at the crime scene if he didn’t commit the murder.

"Please don’t speculate on things you don’t know, focus on what you do know," said Bell.  He accused Grant of trying to throw several "red herrings" at jurors to distract them from the truth.  "He hogtied Candace Derksen and left her to die. You’ll come to one conclusion and one conclusion only," said Bell.

source:  http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/breakingnews/Jurors-consider-verdict-in-Derksen-trial-116366469.html (http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/breakingnews/Jurors-consider-verdict-in-Derksen-trial-116366469.html)
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: debbiec on February 18, 2011, 09:36:11 AM
By: Mike McIntyre
Posted: 02/17/2011 2:17 PM
 
WINNIPEG - He sat silently in the prisoner’s docket, never uttering a word during a month-long trial. But it was more than just Mark Grant’s voice that jurors were deprived of hearing.

Grant, 47, has an extensive history with the criminal justice system which would have been revealed in court had he taken the witness stand to testify. Instead, he exercised his right to silence and kept his dark secrets hidden from the people who would decide his fate. An accused’s criminal history can only be put before a jury if they choose to testify on their own behalf, thus making their credibility an issue to be grilled on cross-examination.

Court documents obtained by the Free Press reveal Grant has schizophrenia, and a mind previously preoccupied with disturbing rape fantasies, lust for vulnerable teens, a hatred of women and an unwillingness to take any treatment.

Grant spent nearly 13 years in prison from 1991 to 2004 -- save for a nine-day stretch of parole when he raped another young woman. Behind bars, Grant alluded to other sex crimes dating as far back as the 1970s for which he was never charged, but he never disclosed specific details nor mentioned Candace Derksen.

Justice officials previously expressed grave concern for the safety of any young woman who had contact with him.

"Your sexual/assaultive behaviour has resulted in serious harm to the victims. You have been predatory in your choice of victims, often looking for unsophisticated and vulnerable post-pubescent female children," the National Parole Board wrote in revoking his parole in 1995.

"The board is satisfied that, if released, you are likely to commit an offence causing the death of or serious harm to another person before the expiration of your sentence."

It noted Grant’s self-reported "sexually deviant" behaviour that hadn’t resulted in criminal charges -- including raping a drunk female stranger. He linked his "hatred of women" to the behaviour of his mother and sister and being "victimized" as a child but gave no specifics.

He also refused any type of treatment -- such as chemical castration -- that would have reduced his sexual urges.

"You are considered to be more concerned about your own sexual gratification than you are about the consequences your offending causes to others," the parole board wrote in 2004. "You admit your sexual gratification comes from the vulnerability of young women and children as ‘they are so trusting.’"

Testing of Grant revealed an "elevated level of arousal to rape stimuli" with the highest peaks occurring "with material depicting inappropriate sexual contacts with children, predominantly to female."

Grant’s criminal record at the time Candace went missing in November 1984 included a prior sexual assault conviction against an underage sex trade worker, plus convictions for forgery, fraud, break and enter, escape and failing to comply with court orders.

In fact, Grant had been in custody since May 24, 1984 following an arrest for break and enter, but escaped from a city hospital on Nov. 7 that year. He was 21 years old at the time. A Canada-wide warrant was issued for his arrest but not executed until days after Candace vanished on Nov. 30.

He was convicted in November 1991 of raping a young woman and given four years in prison. In July 1994 he was released on parole, then brutally raped a woman, 22, nine days later. His parole was revoked and he was eventually sentenced to nine years in prison.

The new time was added to the existing sentence, meaning his parole was re-calculated and the full sentence wouldn’t expire until September 2004. Grant served every minute of the sentence, as parole was denied based on his continuing rejection of treatment and what the board deemed an "enormous" risk of reoffending.

Grant was released at the end of his sentence but subjected to a peace bond application by Winnipeg police and a public alert through the Community Notification Advisory Committee. Conditions included staying away from children. The order expired in late 2005, and police issued a second warning to the community.

Around this time, officers began taking another look at Grant as a potential suspect in Candace Derksen’s abduction and killing. Police also began to monitor Grant’s movements with regular surveillance under what they called "Project Angel" that would eventually lead to his arrest in May 2007. He has been in custody ever since.

http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/breakingnews/Accused-killer-in-Derksen-case-has-long-history-of-sex-crimes-116421004.html (http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/breakingnews/Accused-killer-in-Derksen-case-has-long-history-of-sex-crimes-116421004.html)
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: debbiec on February 18, 2011, 11:16:49 PM
By: Mike McIntyre
Posted: 02/18/2011 9:02 PM | Comments: 19 | Last Modified: 02/18/2011 10:31 PM |

A Winnipeg jury has brought closure to a mystery that has haunted local residents for more than 26 years — Mark Grant killed Candace Derksen.

Grant, 47, was convicted Friday evening of second-degree murder for a crime many believed would never be solved. The 13-year-old girl was grabbed off the street Nov. 30, 1984 while walking home from school, bound with rope and left to freeze to death inside a brickyard shed. Her body was found in the shed Jan. 17, 1985, following an exhaustive search that included hundreds of volunteers.

Jurors spent three days weighing the evidence case Grant, which largely consisted of DNA evidence that finally cracked the case in 2007. Grant is a notorious convicted sex offender who has spent much of his adult life in prison, although jurors had no idea about his previous criminal record because he never testified in his own defence and the Crown wasn’t allowed to present evidence of bad character.

At least one female juror was in tears as the unanimous verdict was delivered. Grant showed no obvious reaction to the verdict. Family and friends of Candace embraced each other and several police officers who were involved in the high-profile investigation and who had rushed downtown on a cold winter’s night to catch the verdict.

Outside court, an emotional Cliff and Wilma Derksen said they often wondered whether their journey for justice would ever end.

"I think the jury was tremendously courageous," said Wilma, wiping her eyes while clutching a fresh white rose in her hands. She plans to lay the flower at Candace’s headstone in a private family service Saturday morning.

"It’s a symbol of innocence, purity, love and fresh beginnings," she said. "The way this story has come together has completed us."

Cliff was quick to thank police officers who were determined to solve the case, and the Crown prosecutors who made a convincing case to the jury. The family was not at all disappointed jurors found Grant not guilty of the original charge of first-degree murder, which carries a mandatory life sentence with no chance of parole for 25 years.

Grant will be sentenced at a later date and faces a life term with at least 10 years behind bars. The Crown could seek to have it raised. Grant is expected to file an appeal based on a series of pre-trial issues and rulings. He has 30 days to do so. Grant’s sentencing has been adjourned to a future date. He remains in custody.

David Wiebe was one of the last people to see Candace alive, his final memory of her a playful snowball fight they had together outside the school they both attended. He was once viewed as a suspect in the case and attended every second of the trial, sitting with the Derksen family.

"This has been an incredibly freeing experience," he said outside court. "The whole process has been extremely healing."

Deliberations began Wednesday afternoon as jurors faced a difficult task in weighing four weeks of conflicting evidence. All 12 jurors had to agree on Grant’s fate or else the result would be a hung jury and mistrial. The Crown would then have the option of putting Grant on trial a second time at a future date.

The reliability of the DNA evidence was very much a live issue, as evident by the vastly different closing arguments from Crown and defence lawyers.

Grant’s lawyer, Saul Simmonds, attacked the Crown’s case by accusing them of using "bad science" to try to solve the high-profile mystery. He said police ignored certain evidence that pointed away from Grant, contaminated the original crime scene and mishandled key exhibits such as the twine used to tie up Candace Derksen.

"This is a case with overwhelming doubt.," said Simmonds, who suggested the real killer has never been caught.

Crown attorney Brian Bell told jurors their job is relatively simple if they ignore the "red herrings" being thrown their way. He said DNA evidence clearly connects Grant to the slaying, with only a one-in-50-million chance the genetic profile is from someone else. He said there is no reasonable explanation of how Grant’s DNA could be at the crime scene if he didn’t commit the crime.

"Please don’t speculate on things you don’t know, focus on what you do know," said Bell.

Three pubic hairs were found on or near Candace’s body, although police have said she wasn’t sexually assaulted. Four scalp hairs that appeared to have been lightly bleached near the roots were on Candace’s clothing. There is evidence Grant had dyed his hair around the same time, and his profile couldn’t be excluded.

As well, DNA extracted from the twine was found to be a maternal match to Grant. All of his siblings were later excluded as the donor.

Simmonds called an expert witness last week who discredited some of the DNA findings used against his client.

"Your responsibility is to protect him from a possible wrongful conviction. He is not the person who did this. His future now rests in your hands," Simmonds said in his final argument.

"He hog-tied Candace Derksen and left her to die. You’ll come to one conclusion and one conclusion only," Bell later said in reply.

www.mikeoncrime.com

Quote
http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/breakingnews/Not-guilty-verdict-in-Derksen-case-116514733.html
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: Concerned on February 18, 2011, 11:31:37 PM
I am happy for this family. But I have to say, it is a sad day when he may only get 10 years for the life of a little girl who he left there to freeze to death. And, he has a past history. 10  years? Seriously?  I guess we want to give him a chance to do it again some day?
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: solvy on February 18, 2011, 11:40:47 PM
So true concerned, and he will.
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: debbiec on February 19, 2011, 09:42:47 AM
I'm glad that this guilty verdict will help Candace's family move ahead with their lives.

They always say a picture is worth a thousand words. I've posted a picture of Wilma and Cliff Derksen outside the courtroom yesterday, after the verdict was read.


By DEAN PRITCHARD, QMI Agency

Last Updated: February 18, 2011 10:22pm
Email Story Print Size A A A Report Typo
 
Wilma and Cliff Derksen outside the courtroom after Mark Grant was found guilty of second degree murder in the death of Candace Derksen more than twenty years ago. (Chris Procaylo, QMI Agency) WINNIPEG - After 26 years, a five-week trial and three days of tension filled deliberations, Wilma and Cliff Derksen finally know who killed their daughter Candace.

Before a courtroom packed with relatives, friends and media, jurors convicted Mark Edward Grant of second-degree murder.

"We never thought there would be any resolution to that mystery of 26 years," Wilma said late Friday night before a throng of reporters outside court. "We're totally amazed."

Candace, 13, disappeared while walking home from Mennonite Brethren Collegiate Institute on Nov. 30, 1984. Her frozen body was discovered six weeks later in a tool shed at Alsip's Industrial Products, near the Nairn Avenue overpass. Her wrists and ankles had been tied behind her back with twine.

Grant, 47, stood trial charged with first-degree murder. The second-degree verdict suggests jurors did not believe Grant planned to kill Candace.

Wilma said a second-degree murder conviction was no less satisfying. "I think the jury was tremendously courageous in their decision," she said. "They did a fantastic job in putting that all together."

Wilma said the trial answered questions about Candace's last hours that have remained a mystery for decades.

"It's amazing to me how healing those answers are," she said. "The way the story has come together has completed us in a way I never expected. We are starting afresh. The last five weeks have changed us in a good way. I'm calling it my million-dollar therapy."

The case against Grant hinged on DNA connected to seven hairs found at the murder scene and on the twine used to bind Derksen's limbs -- DNA the Crown said positively linked Grant to the killing.

Defence lawyer Saul Simmonds argued Grant was the victim of sloppy science and evidence contamination.

At the same time Simmonds was arguing the Crown couldn't prove Grant's DNA was found at the crime scene he provided seemingly innocent explanations for how it could have been left there. Simmonds said there was no evidence to prove Grant never worked at Alsip's or that he might have handled the twine while making sandbags for flood relief.

Crown attorney Brian Bell urged jurors to ignore such "red herrings."

"Please don't speculate on what you don't know, focus on what you do know," Bell said Wednesday in his closing address to jurors.

Saturday, the Derksens will visit Candace's gravesite.

"We'll lay down roses and we are going to cry again and we are going to move on. Start something new. Start a new life," Wilma said.

Jurors deliberating Grant's fate did so with no knowledge of his violent criminal past, which included three convictions for rape in the past 23 years.

Grant will be sentenced at a later date to life in prison. The only question to decide is when he will be eligible for parole.

http://www.edmontonsun.com/news/canada/2011/02/18/17336541.html (http://www.edmontonsun.com/news/canada/2011/02/18/17336541.html)
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: capeheart on February 19, 2011, 09:52:33 AM
This is outrageous that this man was not convicted long before now. They must have known he was a sex offender at that time. What a horrendous ordeal for Candace and the way she died. This is something that will haunt her parents until they die. It is so very sad to think of what monsters are out there every day watching and waiting to violate and torture children.  :( :( :( :( :( :( :(
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: debbiec on February 19, 2011, 05:21:02 PM
Updated: Sat Feb. 19 2011 15:28:58

ctvwinnipeg.ca

One day after their daughter's killer was found guilty of second degree murder, the parents of Candace Derksen say they have forgiven the man who left their daughter to die.

"I feel sorry for this gentleman and we have compassion for him and he's made some bad decisions," said Cliff Derksen. "But you know, it's all about love again."

The Derksen family along with a small group of friends laid white roses - a symbol of innocence – on Candace Derksen's grave Saturday morning, hoping to close a dark chapter in their lives.

"This is our recommitment to love, to forgive and to live," said Wilma Derksen. "We're going to live."

The gathering came less than 24-hours after Mark Edward Grant was found guilty of murdering their Daughter. For Wilma and Cliff, it was a welcome end to a 26 year journey.

Candace Derksen disappeared while walking home from school in 1984. Seven weeks later her frozen body was discovered inside a machine shed not far from her home. Her arms were bound behind her back and tied at her ankles.

23 years would pass until DNA evidence found at the scene would eventually point to convicted sex offender Mark Edward Grant, who was arrested in 2007.

"Wilma and I have to admit that we had actually given up hope," said Cliff Derksen at the time.

Now, nearly three decades after their daughter's body was found, the Derksen's have justice – and closure.

"Now they know," said family friend Pastor John Epp at Candace's grave. "They have the details they were always lacking."

"Looking at their life and how they live in light of this, their love for Candace has kind of shaped their life and who they are as people," said Chris Lenshyn, a close family member.

Mark Grant now faces a mandatory life sentence with no chance of parole for ten years. However, the judge has the right to increase that to the maximum of 25 years. Sentencing is set for March.

-With a report from CTV's Caroline Barghout

http://winnipeg.ctv.ca/servlet/an/local/CTVNews/20110219/wpg_derksen_goodbye_110219/20110219/?hub=WinnipegHome (http://winnipeg.ctv.ca/servlet/an/local/CTVNews/20110219/wpg_derksen_goodbye_110219/20110219/?hub=WinnipegHome)
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: capeheart on February 19, 2011, 08:50:45 PM
He should get the 25 years, he is one dangerous individual and he is still a young man. He should be serving the time. He did the crime and he should do the time. Just because it took years to get to him doesn't mean he shouldn't pay for it. I don't know how these people can really forgive someone who did that and it is good that they can, because they say it is easier on the person to forgive then to live with the anger inside. God bless her parents who have gone through so many years of waiting for justice.
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: AlbertaCowboy on February 21, 2011, 01:22:21 PM
Looks like we can finally move this thread into the "Solved" category!
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: debbiec on February 21, 2011, 04:44:08 PM

CBC News Posted: Feb 21, 2011 11:26 AM CST Last Updated: Feb 21, 2011 11:26 AM CST

Mark Edward Grant is planning to appeal his conviction in connection to the death of Winnipeg schoolgirl Candace Derksen.

"You can count on it," Grant's defence lawyer, Saul Simmonds, told CBC News on Monday.

He said the appeal can only happen after the sentencing process, set for next month, has been completed.

"The jury has left [Grant] very disappointed in their verdict. Obviously, from our perspective, the matter will have to go further," Simmonds said.

The supply shed near the Nairn Overpass where Candace Derksen's frozen body was found on Jan. 17, 1985. (CBC)
After an emotional and at times complex five-week trial, a jury weighed the evidence for two days before convicting Grant, 47, of second-degree murder on Friday evening.

He faced a first-degree murder charge, but the seven-man, five-woman jury found him not guilty in favor of convicting him of the lesser offence.

Derksen was found hog-tied and frozen to death on the dirt floor of a rarely-used supply shed in a brickyard about 500 metres from her family home on Jan. 13, 1985.

She vanished off the street while walking home from school on Nov. 30, 1984. Her disappearance triggered a massive community search, and struck fear into the hearts of many that a predator was on the loose.

Derksen's death remained a public mystery until May 2007 when police came forward with new forensic evidence linking Grant to the murder scene.

Jurors did not make a recommendation to the court about when he may be eligible for parole.

The second-degree murder conviction carries with it no chance of parole for a minimum of 10 years, but the court could elect to raise that as high as 25 years.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/story/2011/02/21/mb-appeal-derksen-murder-verdict-grant-winnipeg.html (http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/story/2011/02/21/mb-appeal-derksen-murder-verdict-grant-winnipeg.html)
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: AlbertaCowboy on February 22, 2011, 03:57:42 PM
I say raise his parole eligibility to 25 years.  He has already been declared a dangerous offender, and will be locked away until he is in his late 60's.  He is a predatory animal who has shown no remorse for his victims.
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: debbiec on February 22, 2011, 04:02:37 PM

I agree AlbertaCowboy. There is really no question that if he is free he will continue as he always has. It only took nine days for him to rape a 22 year old woman, once he was paroled before.
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: debbiec on March 10, 2011, 01:29:12 PM
By: The Canadian Press
10/03/2011 1:18 PM

WINNIPEG - A man convicted in the freezing death of a Winnipeg teen in 1984 is to be sentenced April 27.

Mark Edward Grant was found guilty by a Queen's Bench jury last month after a trial that focused on DNA evidence.

A life sentence is mandatory for second-degree murder.

It will be up to chief Justice Glenn Joyal to set the number of years Grant will have to serve before he is eligible for parole.

Candace Derksen was just 13 and on her way home from school in December 1984 when she disappeared.

Her frozen body was found six weeks later in a brickyard shed.

http://www.brandonsun.com/national/breaking-news/mark-edward-grant-to-be-sentenced-april-27-for-freezing-death-of-winnipeg-teen-117742833.html?thx=y (http://www.brandonsun.com/national/breaking-news/mark-edward-grant-to-be-sentenced-april-27-for-freezing-death-of-winnipeg-teen-117742833.html?thx=y)
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: solvy on March 10, 2011, 03:26:35 PM
I certainly hope they put him where the sun don't shine for many many years.  How about a brickyard shed in a winnipeg winter....
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: debbiec on March 10, 2011, 03:42:52 PM

Sounds good to me solvy! We likely haven't heard the end of this yet, as I have read that he is going to appeal his sentence.

Second degree, so it carries a mandatory life sentence, however, I saw somewhere that he could be eligible for parole in as early as ten years? That yet to be determined at the sentencing.
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: solvy on March 10, 2011, 03:55:22 PM
Don't know how anyone could find sympathy for this creep, but we have seen before the worst of the worst always seem to garner sympathy from some people.  I this doesn't come to pass.  He needs to be dealt with harshly and quickly put away.
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: debbiec on April 26, 2011, 01:22:20 PM
By Mike McIntyre, Winnipeg Free Press April 26, 2011


WINNIPEG — The latest chapter in one of Winnipeg's most notorious murder mysteries is set to begin Wednesday.

Mark Grant will return to a city courtroom to be sentenced for the 1984 killing of 13-year-old Candace Derksen. Jurors convicted him in February of second-degree murder, which carries an automatic life sentence.

The only question that remains to be answered is how long Grant will have to spend behind bars before he is eligible for parole.

Grant, 47, faces at least 10 years in prison, but Queen's Bench Chief Justice Glenn Joyal has the option of raising that number as high as 25 years. In arguing for a much stiffer sanction, the Crown will no doubt bring up the fact Grant is a convicted sex offender who has spent much of his adult life in prison.

The hearing is set to last the full day.

Candace was grabbed off the street Nov. 30, 1984, while walking home from school, bound with rope and left to freeze to death inside a brickyard shed. Her body was found in the shed Jan. 17, 1985, after an exhaustive search that included hundreds of volunteers.

Jurors spent three days weighing the evidence against Grant, which largely consisted of DNA evidence that finally cracked the case in 2007.

Grant is expected to appeal the jury's verdict, citing alleged errors made by the judge. He has 30 days from his sentencing date to file the paperwork.

During the trial, Grant's lawyer, Saul Simmonds, attacked the Crown's case by accusing it of using "bad science" to try to solve the mystery.

He said police ignored certain evidence that pointed away from Grant, contaminated the original crime scene and mishandled key exhibits such as the twine used to tie Candace up.

Crown attorney Brian Bell told jurors their job would be relatively simple if they ignored the "red herrings" being thrown their way. He said DNA evidence clearly connects Grant to the slaying, with only a one-in-50-million chance the genetic profile is from someone else. He said there is no reasonable explanation of how Grant's DNA could be at the crime scene if he didn't commit the crime.

Three pubic hairs were found on or near Candace's body, although police have said she wasn't sexually assaulted. Four scalp hairs that appeared to have been lightly bleached near the roots were on Candace's clothing.

There is evidence Grant had dyed his hair around the same time and his profile couldn't be excluded. As well, DNA extracted from the twine was found to be a maternal match to Grant.

© Copyright (c) Winnipeg Free Press


http://www.timescolonist.com/news/Killer+sentenced+1984+murder+Winnipeg+girl/4673211/story.html (http://www.timescolonist.com/news/Killer+sentenced+1984+murder+Winnipeg+girl/4673211/story.html)

Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: debbiec on April 26, 2011, 01:33:48 PM
Quote
Grant is expected to appeal the jury's verdict, citing alleged errors made by the judge. He has 30 days from his sentencing date to file the paperwork.


So it looks like this will be ongoing.
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: debbiec on May 26, 2011, 11:23:37 AM
Updated: Thu May. 26 2011 12:01:56
ctvwinnipeg.ca


Sentencing for Mark Grant started Thursday morning in Winnipeg.

Grant was found guilty in February of second-degree murder for the death of Candace Derksen, 13. Her body was found in a shed, weeks after she went missing in November 1984.

In May 2007, Grant was arrested for Derksen's death after a cold-case police unit began investigating the case.

Justice Glenn Joyal ruled in court to allow pre-sentencing materials in Grant's case.

The Crown said Grant is troubled person who acts out his anger in primitive, uncontrolled ways.

The Crown said Grant was diagnosed with schizophrenia at age 12, but has refused at times to take medication as it lowers his libido. The Crown said when Grant is off his medication, he has violent sexual fantasies.

The Crown said Grant, 47, has accumulated 23 past convictions and has spent more than 20 years in jail.

Grant told court officials he believes he is the devil and he hears voices.

The Crown said there is no adequate level of community supervision to protect the public from Grant.

The Crown is asking that Grant not become eligible for parole for 25 years, rather than the minimum of 10 years, and that he be under a lifetime weapons ban and have to submit a DNA sample.

The sentencing hearing is set to continue Thursday afternoon.

- with a report from CTV's Stacey Ashley


http://winnipeg.ctv.ca/servlet/an/local/CTVNews/20110526/wpg_grant_sentencing_110526/20110526/?hub=WinnipegHome (http://winnipeg.ctv.ca/servlet/an/local/CTVNews/20110526/wpg_grant_sentencing_110526/20110526/?hub=WinnipegHome)
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: debbiec on May 26, 2011, 03:41:13 PM

Mark Edward Grant must serve at least 25 years in prison for the murder of 13-year-old Candace Derksen, a judge has ruled.

Grant showed unspeakable cruelty when he hog-tied the girl and left her to die in a tool shed on a cold winter night nearly 27 years ago, said Justice Glenn Joyal.

Grant, 47, was convicted of second-degree murder following a jury trial last February.
Grant showed no change in emotion as he was led out of court in handcuffs.

Defence lawyer Saul Simmonds had argued Grant should serve no more than 14 years in prison before he is eligible for parole.

Outside court, Candace's mother Wilma said she had "conflicted" feelings about the sentence.

"We grieve," she said. "This is putting another life away and this doesn't bring Candace back.

Grant is expected to appeal his conviction.


http://www.winnipegsun.com/2011/05/26/grant-gets-max-for-derksen-murder (http://www.winnipegsun.com/2011/05/26/grant-gets-max-for-derksen-murder)
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: debbiec on June 13, 2011, 09:32:24 PM
Derksen killer appeals

JAMES TURNER
METRO NEWS
Published: June 14, 2011 5:00 a.m.
Last modified: June 13, 2011 10:59 p.m.

 
The man convicted in one of the most haunting homicide cases in the city’s history has launched a sweeping appeal in hopes of gaining a new trial.

Through his lawyers, Mark Edward Grant alleges the Court of Queen’s Bench justice who oversaw his murder case made 18 specific errors that he believes should result in a rehearing.

Grant, 47, is appealing his second-degree murder conviction and the sentence of life in prison without parole for 25 years handed to him May 26 in connection to the 1984 death of Candace Derksen.

Derksen, 13, disappeared after school on Nov. 30, 1984. She was found hog-tied and frozen to death in a shed near the Nairn Overpass weeks later. The shed was not far from her home.

The case went unsolved until 2007, when Winnipeg cold-case investigators came forward and charged Grant with first-degree murder, saying they found DNA evidence to link Grant to the crime scene.

Grant’s grounds for appeal range from saying Justice Glenn Joyal erred by allowing jurors to hear a statement he gave to missing persons investigators at the Remand Centre not long after Derksen disappeared to issues relating to the testimony given by the Crown’s expert DNA witness.

The Crown has not filed a rebuttal, and a date to hear the appeal has not been set. 
 
http://www.metronews.ca/winnipeg/local/article/888773--derksen-killer-appeals (http://www.metronews.ca/winnipeg/local/article/888773--derksen-killer-appeals)
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: debbiec on November 23, 2011, 11:19:23 AM


This is a very long read so I haven't posted it in it's entirety. More can be read at the link below.


Winnipeg Free Press - PRINT EDITION

Closure for Candace
A gathering of family, friends and strangers brought an emotional mixture of grief, gratitude and grace to Cliff and Wilma Derksen's backyard after their daughter's killer was sentenced last spring


By: Mike McIntyre

Posted: 11/19/2011 1:00 AM

Thursday, May 26, 2011

Their guests began arriving on time, right around 6 p.m. They were greeted with smiles, hugs and handshakes from Cliff and Wilma and their daughter, Odia.

Chairs had been set up in a circle inside their gazebo. Guests quickly filed in, grabbing a drink, some chicken and salads that had been catered from the Derksens' favourite restaurant.

It was nearly 7 p.m. when Cliff and Wilma spoke to the group. It was time to get started.

Wilma explained how thrilled she was to see many friends, some old, many new, on such an important day in their lives.

Wilma suggested they go around the circle, each person taking a few moments to describe who they were and what had brought them there.

This was for the benefit of the entire group, some 50 people strong, who certainly did not all know each other but had come together on this night for a common purpose.

Wilma also wanted to know what they were thinking after such a monumental event, the sentencing of Candace's killer.

Finally, she asked everyone to provide a single word, or two perhaps, that best summarized their thoughts and feelings.

It was going to be an emotional evening.

"There is no jubilation in the moment," their first guest began. Gerry Michalski was a longtime family friend who also happened to be their pastor. He expressed the deep hurt and anger he felt at hearing about Mark Grant's twisted past for the first time in court earlier that day.

He told the gathering he felt "dirty" upon hearing of Grant's hatred towards women.

Michalski's wife was next. She described the evening as a celebration of "the end of a chapter." And certainly the beginning of a new one.

They continued around the room. One woman described her feelings of the day as "shock and awe." Another spoke about a strong feeling of bonding she had experienced throughout the ordeal, a coming together of "family." Another woman used the term "connecting."

"Generosity," said Lisa Phommarath, another good friend of the family. "My thoughts were just how generously you gave of your time during your own hearing and trial. And Cliff, as well."

"Exhale," said Misty Blake-Knox.

Brian Campbell called the evening a "new beginning." He described Cliff and Wilma as "amazing."

"Once in a blue moon, justice happens," said Bernie Bowman.

http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/opinion/fyi/closure-for-candace-134168123.html (http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/opinion/fyi/closure-for-candace-134168123.html)

Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: debbiec on November 23, 2011, 11:24:21 AM
#1 - Candace Derksen (POSTMEDIA)

#2 - Pallbearers carry Candace Derksen's casket though blowing snow on Jan. 24, 1985. (WAYNE GLOWACKI / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS ARCHIVES)

#3 - Wilma Derksen places roses on her daughter's grave following the conviction of Candace's killer last February. (RUTH BONNEVILLE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS)
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: solvy on November 23, 2011, 02:53:36 PM
TY Debbie for posting that it was lovely to see her in a beautiful res ting place finally.
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: debbiec on November 23, 2011, 03:19:45 PM

It's been a very long time coming.

YW solvy.
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: debbiec on December 31, 2011, 03:53:04 PM
Winnipeg Free Press - ONLINE EDITION

Respect, sensitivity for Candace, family
By: Staff Writer

Posted: 12/31/2011 1:28 PM 

ON Jan. 17, 1985, Winnipeg youngster Mike McMcIntyre and his family were celebrating his 10th birthday, but an unanticipated sorrow overshadowed the occasion.

As the Free Press justice reporter notes in the preface to this sophisticated true-crime book, that was the day the frantic and prolonged search for a local missing child ground to a painful end. The body of 13-year-old Candace Derksen was found bound and frozen in an industrial storage shed.

She had been abducted off the street on an ordinary walk home from school, the beginning of a tragedy that frightened Mc-Intyre as a child, haunted him as an adult, and eventually became the focus of Journey for Justice, his fifth crime book.

Like the McIntyre family, most of the city of Winnipeg had followed the search for Candace. Her disappearance and death were an emotional watershed for a community that had long believed itself a safe place for kids.

Mark Edward Grant, a vagrant with a hard-luck childhood, several mental disabilities and a history of criminal acts, was convicted 26 years later of the little girl’s second-degree murder, becoming the city’s bona fide bogeyman.

Crime writers are often known to be coldhearted in their narratives, indeed probably need to be, in order to remain emotionally intact to tell the next story.

In Journey for Justice, however, McIntyre writes with exceptional respect and sensitivity. He attributes this partly to his relationship with Candace’s parents, Cliff and Wilma Derksen, whom he describes as "two of the strongest, most courageous people" he has ever met. He got to know them, he writes, while covering the Grant trial.

McIntyre has obviously honed his skills on his previous books, among them Devil Among Us (about pedophile Peter Whitmore) and Nowhere to Run (about the murder of RCMP Const. Dennis Stronquill), both of which were also published by Winnipeg’s Great Plains Publications.

Any misgivings that McIntyre’s emotional attachment to the story or to the Derksen family might prejudice his account are quickly forgotten as it becomes obvious that his interviews with them are accompanied by countless interviews with police, with jurists, with mental-health workers and by a rigorous inclusion of court testimony.

Readers who want to know more about "the angel squad" of devoted police officers who stayed with and cracked the 25-yearold cold case will be satisfied, as will readers who want to know more about the murderer now behind bars.

While McIntyre walks us through the facts and chronology of the story, he calls on the voice of Wilma to ponder the most intimate impact of her daughter’s death, frequently foreshadowing a chapter with excerpts from her own eloquent book, Have You Seen Candace?, published in 1991.

It’s an effective device that builds credibility and adds a deeply personal dimension to what might have turned out in less capable hands as "just another police file."

Journey for Justice is an important addition to the library of books about the city’s history. Along with the complex emotional and spiritual shock of the Derksen murder, McIntyre has captured the many positive changes that followed in its wake, new networks for the prevention of crimes against children and support for families suffering from life-threatening emotional injuries such as the Derksen family experienced.

During Grant’s often confusing trial, Wilma noted that she wanted somebody to write the whole story out for her in a way she could understand, a small enough request in light of what she has suffered.

Journey for Justice has come closer to doing that than anything published before it.

Winnipeg writer and broadcaster Lesley Hughes covered the Derksen case in the 1980s.

http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/arts-and-life/entertainment/books/Respect-sensitivity-for-Candace-family-136479223.html (http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/arts-and-life/entertainment/books/Respect-sensitivity-for-Candace-family-136479223.html)


Below: JOHN WOODS / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS ARCHIVES Wilma and Cliff Derksen speak to the media after Grant�s murder conviction last February. (POSTMEDIA JOHN.WOODS@FREEPRESS.M)

Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: debbiec on February 28, 2012, 05:53:06 PM
Crack in cold case offered ‘new chance at healing’

By Tamara King ,Winnipeg Sun
First posted: Tuesday, February 28, 2012 04:04 PM CST | Updated: Tuesday, February 28, 2012 04:57 PM CST


For more than two decades, Wilma Derksen knew she might go to her grave never knowing who killed her daughter Candace.

At the age of 13, Candace disappeared on her way home from school on Nov. 30, 1984. Her body was found, bound and frozen, six weeks later.

From the beginning, Wilma Derksen and her husband understood there was a possibility that the murderer might go free.

“We had accepted that. So we were really shocked 22 years later. Twenty-two years is a long time,” Wilma said in a recent interview with the Winnipeg Sun.

In 2007, detectives in the Winnipeg police cold case unit collared a suspect in the Derksen homicide.

“That seemed to us a huge miracle. But in some ways it was kind of hard, because it disrupted our lives again, right, like it was a whole new thing to deal with, and a huge thing,” Wilma said.

Though they always wanted to know who stole Candace away — and why — through the years, Wilma said she knew she had to focus on the road ahead for the sake of her other two children. Wilma’s other daughter was only nine when Candace disappeared.

“My message to myself was, just keep truckin’. Just keep moving, it’s your life, you only have one chance. Just live every day fully. There’s kind of a contradiction, but living fully actually helps us deal with crisis and grief,” Wilma said.

“There’s a part of me that will always stay with Candace. There’s a place that I can go to grieve, to cry ... But having gone through what we did, it just took so long that each day is precious, and if we don’t pay attention to the people around us, we’re not living fully,” said Wilma. “There’s always other people around us that need the love. We do need to balance.”

That’s not to suggest there weren’t dark days.

“I think we can’t avoid the dark. But we can layer it with love, and I think that’s been my saving grace, just to try. Sometimes I don’t get there, sometimes the hate does overwhelm, sometimes the anger does drive me to the ground,” said Wilma.

In February 2011, after a five-week trial, a jury convicted Mark Edward Grant of second-degree murder. He is serving an automatic life sentence and is not eligible for parole for 25 years. Grant has launched an appeal.

The trial answered questions about Candace’s last hours that have remained a mystery for decades and offered “a new level of healing,” said Wilma.

But in spite of the conviction, the raw feelings of loss are constant, Wilma said.

“Every day you lose something. You lose the grandchildren, you lose the potential, and her presence every day.”


A CRACK IN THE CASE

Some of the Manitoba murder cases that resulted in charges being laid years after the fact:

David Joseph Boulanger, who went by the name Divas B, was missing for more than a month before the 28-year-old’s body was found by hunters behind a Trans-Canada Highway rest stop east of Portage la Prairie on Nov. 3, 2004. Theodore Raymond Herntier was picked up by police near Arcola, Sask., in July 2010 and charged with second-degree murder. He was 40 years old at the time of his arrest. Boulanger was a transgendered sex-trade worker and drug user but RCMP wouldn’t say if that lifestyle was a factor in the homicide.

Derek James Kembel, 25, vanished after leaving a bar in Dauphin in February 2003. His body has never been found. In March 2011, police announced Christopher Robin Shewchuk, 29, of the Rural Municipality of Mountain, had been charged with first-degree murder. His father, Thomas Ronald Shewchuk, 60, was arrested in Winnipegosis and charged with accessory after the fact to murder.

Chantelle Rikheim, 16, was found dead inside her Thompson home after a fire in February 2005, and an autopsy showed she died from blunt-force trauma. The fire was deliberately set, RCMP said. Mounties picked up a 24-year-old man on Feb. 9 at a federal prison in Prince Albert, Sask., and charged him with second-degree murder. The accused lived in Thompson at the time of Rikheim’s death and knew her, RCMP said. He cannot be named because he was a youth at the time.

Beverly Rowbotham, a 42-year-old mother of two, was found dead in a family vehicle outside of Selkirk in October 2000. More than seven years passed before a second-degree murder charge was laid against her husband. The trial for Mark Stobbe is underway in Winnipeg.

http://www.winnipegsun.com/2012/02/28/crack-in-cold-case-offered-new-chance-at-healing-derksen (http://www.winnipegsun.com/2012/02/28/crack-in-cold-case-offered-new-chance-at-healing-derksen)
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: rainstorm on March 06, 2012, 08:44:23 PM
its got to be tough to have to go through thus as a parent. I hope for the parents sake that that snake us locked up and they throw the key away. Before he can hurt anyone else.
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: debbiec on June 13, 2012, 08:19:48 AM
Derksen killer makes fresh evidence bid

By James Turner ,Winnipeg Sun
First posted: Sunday, June 10, 2012 06:49 PM CDT | Updated: Sunday, June 10, 2012 08:49 PM CDT
 

Lawyers for a man found guilty in one of Winnipeg’s most notorious child murders claim to have uncovered compelling new evidence showing bad science and juror bias led to his wrongful conviction.

Mark Edward Grant’s legal team is now seeking the Manitoba’s Court of Appeal permission to introduce “fresh evidence” in his case that they contend is credible and points to Grant’s innocence in the 1984 killing of schoolgirl Candace Derksen.

Grant, 48, was convicted of second-degree murder in February 2011 and later sentenced to life in prison after an at-times complex jury trial in which the intricacies of DNA science loomed large.

Derksen, 13, disappeared after leaving school on Nov. 30, 1984.

She was found weeks later bound with twine and frozen to death in a rarely-used supply shed not far from her home.

Grant wasn’t arrested for her murder until May 2007, about a year after Winnipeg police sent the twine used to bind the girl and some hairs found at the crime scene to what was then Molecular World, a private lab in Thunder Bay.

The lab extracted DNA from the samples that implicated Grant.

The evidence ultimately became the cornerstone of the Crown’s first-degree murder case.

Although Grant’s lawyers insistently challenged the DNA evidence and testimony of Molecular World’s scientists, they say “ongoing concerns” with reliability after the trial caused them to send the hearing transcripts and lab reports to a renowned U.S. genetics expert.

A review by Dr. Bruce Budowle shows there were “unexplained manipulations” by Molecular World of the DNA sample the lab extracted from the twine, defence lawyer Saul Simmonds says in court documents.

Budowle is a retired veteran FBI forensic scientist and now acts as executive director of an investigative genetics institute at a Texas university. “The evidence of Dr. Budowle demonstrates Molecular World excluded data that demonstrated (Grant) was not a contributor to the DNA on the twine,” Simmonds argues.

“The evidence goes directly to the integrity of the lab and their results,” lawyer Saul Simmonds states. “It goes directly to the issue of a wrongful conviction.”

The lawyers also contend a young woman sitting on the jury had made up her mind Grant was guilty after the first day of the five-week-long trial, and thereby breached his right to a fair hearing.

Simmonds will also argue post-conviction comments made by the unidentified juror in a recently-published book about the Derksen case show “the trial was irreparably tainted by bias.”

The woman is quoted directly in the book referring to Grant as “that person in the prisoner’s box … that has committed an unspeakable horrific crime” as she recounts the strain she felt sitting through the trial’s first day.

“The comments made by the juror … demonstrate a state of mind on the first day of the trial that is entirely at odds with a juror’s duty of impartiality,” he says.

“Her comments are a clear apprehension of bias,” says Simmonds.

The Crown has not yet responded to Grant’s claims, and a date to hear his new evidence motion has not been set.

james.turner@sunmedia.ca Twitter: @heyjturner

http://www.winnipegsun.com/2012/06/10/dna-expert-contradicts-grant-trial-evidence (http://www.winnipegsun.com/2012/06/10/dna-expert-contradicts-grant-trial-evidence)
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: debbiec on June 18, 2012, 09:31:00 PM
Wilma Derksen creating support house in honour of murdered daughter  
 
Updated: Mon Jun. 18 2012 19:37:07
ctvwinnipeg.ca


The mother of a teen murdered 28 years ago is working to open a support house for families going through a murder trial.

Wilma Derksen is hoping to raise money to build "Candace House," a safe place for victims of serious crime to stay while the court process unfolds.

Candace disappeared in 1984 and her body was found in a shed the following January. In 2007, Mark Edward Grant was arrested. He was found guilty in 2011.

Derksen hopes to build Candace's House close to the Law Courts building where crime victims can find support, information and encouragement in a safe environment.

A fundraising family fun day is being held on July 7 at the Fort Garry Community Centre.

http://winnipeg.ctv.ca/servlet/an/local/CTVNews/20120618/wpg_candace_house_120618/20120618/?hub=WinnipegHome (http://winnipeg.ctv.ca/servlet/an/local/CTVNews/20120618/wpg_candace_house_120618/20120618/?hub=WinnipegHome)
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: debbiec on April 17, 2013, 09:48:55 AM
Winnipeg Free Press - PRINT EDITION

Candace's killer asks for new trial
Defence says 18 errors made


By: Mike McIntyre
Posted: 1:00 AM

One of Manitoba's most notorious criminal cases is back under a microscope this week in a court hearing that could result in a new trial for Candace Derksen's killer.

Mark Grant appeared Tuesday before the Manitoba Court of Appeal, seeking to have his second-degree murder conviction overturned. Grant, 49, is citing 18 alleged errors made by Chief Justice Glenn Joyal in his handling of the jury trial, which ended in February 2011.

"It raises the spectre of a wrongful conviction," defence lawyer Saul Simmonds told the three justice panel, which will continue hearing arguments today.

Grant is also appealing Joyal's sentence, saying it was unduly harsh. Grant was given a mandatory life sentence with no chance of parole for at 25 years. Joyal said he raised parole eligibility from the minimum of 10 years and imposed the maximum sentence allowed to reflect Grant's horrific criminal record and the severity of his crime.

Derksen, 13, was grabbed off the street on Nov. 30, 1984, while walking home from school, bound with rope and left to freeze to death inside a shed. Her body was found in the shed on Jan. 17, 1985. Jurors spent three days weighing the evidence against Grant, which largely consisted of DNA evidence that finally cracked the case in 2007.

Three pubic hairs were found on or near Candace's body, although police have said she wasn't sexually assaulted. Four scalp hairs that appeared to have been lightly bleached near the roots were on her clothing. There is evidence Grant dyed his hair around the same time. DNA extracted from the twine used to tie her up was found to be a maternal match to Grant.

During the trial, Simmonds accused the Crown of using "bad science." He said police ignored evidence that pointed away from Grant, contaminated the crime scene and mishandled key exhibits, such as the twine.

Simmonds continued that argument Tuesday, saying an American DNA expert who has reviewed the case believes evidence was manipulated against Grant. "The verdict, from our perspective, is unreasonable," said Simmonds.

The Crown plans to argue Simmonds isn't raising any new ground, considering he called another defence expert during the trial to contest the DNA findings, only to have jurors reject that evidence.

Simmonds also takes issue with Joyal's pretrial ruling that excluded jurors from hearing testimony from a Winnipeg woman who claimed in 1985 she was kidnapped by a stranger in an eerily similar fashion to Candace -- only to recant the story 26 years later.

Simmonds had filed a motion to put the woman in the witness box, believing it would prove Grant was innocent of killing Candace. That's because Grant was in custody on other charges at the time the woman, just 12 years old in 1985, was allegedly attacked, meaning he couldn't possibly be responsible for either crime if there was a proven link.

She was discovered by a bystander in the fall of 1985 lying inside an empty railway car on Gateway Road. She was screaming "Mommy, mommy," her wrists and legs were bound, and there was a plastic shopping bag over her head. The 12-year-old told police an unknown man had abducted her around 4 p.m. on a Friday as she left Valley Gardens Junior High School to walk home.

Police were immediately on high alert. The distance between where Candace and the other girl were found was five kilometres.

There were Wrigley gum packages found at both scenes, a connection police were quick to make note of. Even the knot used to tie the girl's arms with plastic tubing was similar to the one found on the twine around Candace's arms.

Investigators went so far as to take the girl to a memorial service for Candace to have her scan the crowd for the potential attacker. She also gave a detailed description of the man and his vehicle, which led to the creation of a composite sketch.

The investigation went cold and no arrests were made. Simmonds came across the file and sought to have jurors hear about it. The Crown was opposed, saying it would "derail" Grant's trial and had "no probative value." The Crown noted police reinterviewed the now-adult woman in early January 2011 and she claimed the alleged attack never happened.

Simmonds argued Tuesday the jury should have heard the evidence.

http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/candaces-killer-asks-for-new-trial-203344141.html (http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/candaces-killer-asks-for-new-trial-203344141.html)
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: debbiec on October 30, 2013, 11:03:09 PM
New trial ordered in Winnipeg teen's death


WINNIPEG - The Manitoba Court of Appeal on Wednesday ordered a new trial for a man convicted in the 1984 murder of a teenage girl.

The Appeal Court ruled that the trial judge was wrong to deny Mark Edward Grant's lawyer the right to present evidence that Candace Derksen might have been killed by someone else. Another girl had been abducted in a similar fashion nine months after Derksen's death when Grant was in custody.

"It seems to me that this evidence, which I view as very relevant, could provide the basis upon which a reasonable, properly instructed jury could acquit," Justice Michel Monnin wrote on behalf of the three-member Appeal Court panel.

"The exclusion of the evidence denied the accused the opportunity of placing before the jury the full answer he wanted to make."

Grant was convicted of second-degree murder and sentenced in 2011 to life with no parole eligibility for at least 25 years.

Derksen was 13 years old when she disappeared on her way home from school. Her body was found six weeks later, bound and frozen, in a storage shed.

Her parents, Wilma and Cliff Derksen, were surprised by the ruling.

"We're kind of shocked and in chaos," Wilma Derksen said outside her home.

"There's a kind of ... tragedy or comedy about it. It's just tough."

Cliff Derksen said the family felt certain that Grant was the killer.

"If there's any doubt, then it needs to be clarified, for sure. I guess we thought there wouldn't be doubt, but apparently there is."

The case against Grant hinged on DNA evidence from hair and fibre samples collected in the shed.

RCMP tested the twine used to bind Derksen in 2001, but results were inconclusive. A private lab, Molecular World in Thunder Bay, Ont., tested the twine and hair again in 2007. It was after that test that Grant was charged.

Grant, who is now 49, has a long criminal history. He spent nearly half his life behind bars for 23 offences. But he repeatedly denied killing Derksen. His lawyer suggested the Crown might think twice about whether to pursue a new trial, given the Appeal Court ruling on the possibility of another killer.

"To not be able to put that before a jury was, from our perspective, a significant blow to our defence," Saul Simmonds said Wednesday.

"It's our hope that maybe the Crown will take the time now to review the case ... and make a determination as to whether or not there will be another prosecution."

Simmonds told court at the time that Grant had a tortured childhood, had been abused by his father and had lived on the streets during his teenage years.

The Crown has not yet decided whether to challenge the Appeal Court ruling, go ahead with a new trial or drop the case.

Wilma Derksen said she and her husband can still feel their daughter's presence, even though decades have gone by.

"She comes, even after all this time, she's here. That means we're alive though.

"We'll make it."

By Steve Lambert, The Canadian Press

http://www.therecord.com/news-story/4182792-new-trial-ordered-in-winnipeg-teen-s-death/ (http://www.therecord.com/news-story/4182792-new-trial-ordered-in-winnipeg-teen-s-death/)
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: jellybean on December 10, 2013, 11:57:42 AM
Take from Winnipeg Sun - Oct
30, 2013.

Just when one thinks this is solved - guess not, in this case. At one point prosecutors had the choice to go forward with this upcoming second trial - or to Drop the Case. :o

http://www.winnipegsun.com/2013/10/30/new-trial-for-mark-grant-in-1984-murder-of-candace-derksen

Oct 30, 2013 - Manitoba's highest court has ordered a new trial for Mark Grant, convicted in the 1984 murder of ... A new trial date has not been set. ... Mark Edward Grant is on trial for first-degree murder in the death of Candace Derksen.

jb
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: debbiec on November 15, 2014, 07:39:24 PM
Derksen murder back in court
Defence argues new evidence discredits damning DNA tests

By: Mia Rabson
Posted: 11/15/2014 1:00 AM


OTTAWA -- The Manitoba government asked the Supreme Court Friday to reinstate a conviction of second-degree murder in the 1984 slaying of Winnipeg teenager Candace Derksen.

Mark Edward Grant was convicted in 2011 of murdering Derksen but his conviction was overturned a year ago by the Manitoba Court of Appeal, which said evidence of a similar case to Derksen's should have been admitted during Grant's trial.
 
Derksen was 13 when she was abducted in November 1984. Her frozen body was found, bound with rope, in a shed the following January. Her case was one of the province's most well-known unsolved cases for more than two decades. Grant wasn't arrested until 2007, after DNA evidence analyzed by a private lab in Thunder Bay, Ont., connected Grant to DNA from the rope used to bind Derksen.

Crown Attorney Ami Kotler told the high court Friday the existence of the second case didn't meet existing legal thresholds to be included in Grant's trial because the evidence between that case and Derksen's were not similar enough. That case involved a 12-year-old girl who was found bound by rope in an abandoned rail car less than a year after Derksen was killed. The girl, now an adult, testified the abduction never happened. The only other witness, the woman who found her, is dead. Grant was in custody when the second girl was allegedly abducted. Kotler told the Supreme Court on Friday the evidence gathered in the case did not show clear links to the Derksen murder and to allow the jury to hear the evidence was too risky. He suggested allowing in evidence with such flimsy connections could mean an accused could try to bring in evidence of cases with no clear connection to their own, but for which they have an alibi.

He said the two biggest alleged connections -- the discovery of the same brand of gum wrapper in both locations and the knot used on the rope bindings -- are not legitimate. The rope bindings were completely different even though they both contained one similar type of "granny knot."

But Grant's defence lawyer, Saul Simmonds, told the court "common sense" dictates there are similarities between the two cases: The girls were about the same age, there was no apparent motive for either attack, neither girl was sexually or physically assaulted, both were fully clothed and tied up with rope, and both were left in isolated locations in the same area of the city.

"This was not the kind of thing that was happening in Winnipeg in 1985," said Simmonds. "To try to suggest there is no connection is not a reasonable suggestion."

He noted police investigating the 12-year-old's case believed there were connections to Derksen and investigated it as such.

Simmonds also told the court Friday there were two other reasons not to reinstate the conviction, including new evidence discrediting the DNA evidence used to convict his client, and the possibility of juror bias.

The DNA evidence was contested during the trial, but Simmonds says he now has a new expert who believes there was a fault with the DNA testing that was not raised at trial.

He said the sample was tested three times, and the first two times it didn't come up with a result. The third test matched to Grant.

Simmonds said he has a DNA expert who says the DNA test results were improbable and may point to a "serious quality assurance" issue.

Grant's defence team also argued there was clear juror bias in the original trial after one of the jurors indicated after the trial she had believed Grant was guilty before the trial was over, and also indicated she had stopped paying attention to the evidence and was instead studying the people in the gallery of the courtroom.

Kotler said the DNA evidence wasn't improperly tested and the explanation for the different results is available from the private lab's reports. He said the first two tests weren't of good quality. He also said the juror's comment was that she believed Grant was guilty after hearing the Crown's evidence on the first day of the trial, and to infer she no longer had an open mind was not fair.

The court reserved its decision. If the court agrees with the Appeal Court to overturn Grant's conviction, Manitoba Justice will have to decide whether to hold another trial or let the case drop.

Grant remains in custody awaiting the outcome.

http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/derksen-murder-back-in-court-282802211.html (http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/derksen-murder-back-in-court-282802211.html)
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: solvy on November 15, 2014, 09:47:34 PM
Oh no.  Now the family will have to go through a long legal re hash of everything, haven't they been through enough already?  So sad for them, its like it never ends.
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: debbiec on March 03, 2015, 10:49:38 AM
Winnipeg Free Press - ONLINE EDITION

Supreme Court to rule on conviction of Candace Derksen slaying

By: Mia Rabson
Posted: 03/2/2015 2:46 PM


OTTAWA – The Supreme Court of Canada will rule Thursday on whether to reinstate the conviction of murder for the man accused of killing Winnipeg teenager Candace Derksen.

The court heard arguments on the appeal in November.

Mark Edward Grant was convicted of killing Candace in 2011. But that conviction was overturned in 2013 by the Manitoba Court of Appeal, which said evidence of a similar case to Derksen’s should have been admitted during Grant’s trial.

The Manitoba crown appealed to the Supreme Court to have the conviction reinstated.

Derksen was abducted in 1984, bound with rope and left to freeze to death in a shed. The case went cold for years. In 2007 Grant was arrested based on DNA evidence found on the rope used to bind Derksen.

Most of the appeal surrounded whether or not Grant received a fair trial because the trial judge refused to allow evidence of the second case to be presented. That case involved a 12-year-old girl who was found in an abandoned boxcar, tied up with rope, nine months after Derksen’s killing. The girl was found by a witness who is now deceased.

The victim, now an adult, testified under oath as an adult that the incident had actually never happened.

Crown attorney Ami Kotler told the Supreme Court in November the evidence gathered in the case did not show clear links to the Derksen murder and to allow the jury to hear the evidence was too risky. Kotler suggested allowing in evidence with such flimsy connections doesn’t meet established legal tests and could mean an accused could try to bring in evidence of cases with no clear connection to their own, but for which they have an alibi.

He said the two biggest alleged connections – the discovery of the same brand of gum wrapper in both locations and the knot used on the rope bindings – are not actually legitimate. The gum was found in different ways and the rope bindings were completely different, even if there was some similarity in the type of knot used, said Kotler.

Grant’s lawyer, Saul Simmonds, told the court common sense dictated there were clear ties between the two cases including the age of the two girls, the fact there was no apparent motive for the crime, the fact neither were sexually or physically assaulted, were left fully clothed, and were left tied up with rope in an isolated location pretty close together.

Simmons also said he had two additional reasons for the conviction not to be reinstated, including faulty DNA testing and juror bias.

The Crown denied either was the case.

Grant remains in custody awaiting the outcome of the Supreme Court hearing.

If the court agrees with the appeal court to overturn Grant’s conviction, Manitoba Justice will have to decide whether to hold another trial or let the case drop.

mia.rabson@freepress.mb.ca

http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/Supreme-Court-to-rule-on-Candace-Derksens-murder-conviction-294715951.html (http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/local/Supreme-Court-to-rule-on-Candace-Derksens-murder-conviction-294715951.html)
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: Kazoo on March 05, 2015, 12:08:28 PM
Supreme Court upholds order for new trial in 30-year-old murder case

WINNIPEG — Canada's highest court has upheld a ruling that a new trial be ordered for Mark Grant, the man convicted of killing 13-year-old Candace Derksen more than 30 years ago.

The Supreme Court of Canada issued the long-awaited ruling Thursday morning.

Grant, 51, was convicted of second-degree murder in February 2011 following a lengthy jury trial. The Crown's case relied heavily on DNA evidence it said positively linked Grant to the killing.

Derksen disappeared after leaving her Winnipeg school on Nov. 30, 1984. She was found weeks later bound with twine and frozen to death in a supply shed near her home.

Grant wasn't arrested for her murder until May 2007, about a year after Winnipeg police sent the twine and some hairs found at the crime scene to what was then Molecular World, a lab in Thunder Bay, Ont.

In a decision last year, the The Manitoba Court of Appeal ruled Justice Glenn Joyal erred in not allowing the jury to hear evidence suggesting another unidentified suspect was responsible for the killing. Specifically, that another adolescent girl was abducted in 1985 and bound with twine at a location not far from where Derksen was found and at a time when Grant was in custody.

Wrigley's gum wrappers were found at both scenes and the wrists of both girls were tied in what was described as "granny knots."


At a hearing in the absence of the jury, the now 40-year-old woman denied she was ever abducted, despite the police statement of a now-deceased woman who said she found the girl tied up in a rail boxcar yelling for help.

“The Court of Appeal was entitled to conclude that there was evidence upon which the jury could find that the subsequent crime had occurred and, having regard to the similarities, that it had been committed by the same person who killed Candace Derksen,” The Supreme Court wrote. “In light of the evidence that the accused could not have committed the other offence, there was some evidence capable of giving the unknown third party suspect defence an air of reality.”

No trial date has been set.

Grant remains in custody.

http://www.torontosun.com/2015/03/05/supreme-court-upholds-order-for-new-trial-in-30-year-old-murder-case
_________________________________________

Even though this is difficult to swallow, the mention that another girl was found bound in a similar fashion along with discarded gum wrappers is kind of interesting. I wonder, do any of you know any SK's that were active/believed to be active during this time frame?
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: capeheart on March 05, 2015, 03:28:07 PM
Totally unexpected news on this case. What in the heck is going on here. He was convicted on DNA and it was a definite conclusion. Now they are talking about a new trial. Also they may just let it go all together. I am so confused by the news report on this, it is unreal. What is going on with the justice department. WAS A MISTAKE MADE HERE AND THE WRONG MAN WENT TO JAIL????? Can't figure this out at all. I hope someone makes it clearer by (a) (b) (c). I am confused. I don't know a lot about this case, but know it is a very old one. :o :o :o :o :o
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: Sap1 on March 25, 2017, 12:53:38 AM
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/candace-derksen-mark-grant-murder-dna-ruling-1.4038386

A Manitoba judge has decided to allow key DNA evidence to be presented in Mark Grant's retrial for the 1984 killing of Candace Derksen.

In her decision this afternoon, Justice Karen Simonsen also dismissed a defence application to stay Mark Grant's retrial. The judge said she wasn't going to go into detail about her decisions and would address that when she delivers her verdict.

In February, Saul Simmonds, Grant's lawyer, filed a motion to stay the case, arguing DNA tests on twine gathered at the murder scene in 1985 were flawed and the twine can't be re-tested.

He said the judge should either throw out the evidence or release his client and end the retrial.

Simonsen disagreed.
Title: Re: Candace Derksen - 13 - Murdered November 30, 1984 - SOLVED
Post by: Sap1 on October 18, 2017, 01:14:14 PM
He isn't really innocent, just can't be proven beyond a reasonable doubt.

http://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/2nd-trial-in-candace-derksen-s-death-ends-in-not-guilty-verdict-1.3638088

WINNIPEG -- A man tried for a second time in the killing of Winnipeg teenager Candace Derksen more than 30 years ago has been found not guilty.
Mark Edward Grant was charged with second-degree murder in the death of the 13-year-old girl, who disappeared on her way home from school in November 1984.
Her frozen body -- feet and hands bound with twine -- was found six weeks later in an industrial shed.

Grant, who is 54, was found guilty on the same charge in 2011 and sentenced to 25 years in prison, but the conviction was overturned and a new trial was ordered.
In her ruling Wednesday, Court of Queen's Bench Justice Karen Simonsen said the Crown's evidence "falls short of the burden of being beyond a reasonable doubt."
Grant, a man with a long criminal record, was arrested in 2007 following DNA testing on the twine used to bind Derksen.
Grant's 2011 conviction was overturned two years later when the Supreme Court of Canada ruled the trial judge erred in not allowing Grant's defence to present evidence that pointed to another possible killer -- an unidentified person who tied up a 12-year-old girl in another part of Winnipeg in 1985, while Grant was in custody on another matter.
In the retrial earlier this year, court heard that DNA samples had deteriorated in the time between Derksen's death and Grant's first trial.
Grant's lawyer, Saul Simmonds, said in his closing arguments that DNA samples the Crown had relied on were so tiny as to be infinitesimal, and could be from one of the many people who had visited the shed where Derksen's body was found.
Crown prosecutor Brent Davidson allowed that some of the DNA evidence might not be reliable, but other DNA tests showed that 99.9 per cent of the population other than Grant would have been excluded.
Simonsen agreed with the Crown and concluded the DNA evidence was flawed.
Davidson also pointed to testimony from Tonia Lachance, a friend of Grant's ex-girlfriend, who quoted him as saying: "I killed her." He later followed that with: "No, I didn't. I'm just kidding."
Lachance said Grant told her: "Keep your mouth shut or I'll do to you what I did to Candace."
The defence called Lachance unreliable.
Simonsen agreed saying the confession was unreliable because the witness waited until 2007 to talk to police.