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Listing Of Unsolved Murders & Missing People In Canada => Ontario Unsolved Murders & Missing People => Other Locations => Topic started by: Ron on October 24, 2016, 11:12:40 PM

Title: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: Ron on October 24, 2016, 11:12:40 PM
Police have a news conference scheduled for 10 am Oct 25, 2016





Police in Southwestern Ontario are tight-lipped on details of suspicious deaths that are currently being investigated.

Woodstock Police, along with the Ontario Provincial Police and London Police Services are expected to update the media about ongoing investigations into multiple deaths in multiple Southwestern Ontario regions. The news conference will be held on Tuesday morning at 10 a.m.

A source close to the investigation tells CityNews the actions of a nurse are being probed.

CityNews has learned the Caressant Care nursing and retirement home in Woodstock is part of the investigation.

Police said they have identified a suspect, but wouldn’t confirm if an arrest had been made.

“We’ve taken all the reasonable measures to ensure public safety,” OPP Sgt. Dave Rektor told the London Free Press.

The multi-jurisdictional investigation began on Sept. 29, when Woodstock police were notified of a suspicious death. The investigation quickly expanded outside of Oxford County, requiring OPP and other police department’s cooperation.

Police have not identified any victims.



                                                  http://www.680news.com/2016/10/24/police-reveal-details-suspicious-deaths-southwestern-ontario/
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: lostlinganer on October 25, 2016, 12:15:34 PM
God rest their precious souls! 
Maybe some of these people were ready and wanting to die;  but then again, maybe none of them even thought of it.  We'll see where this goes~

Quote
Police say Elizabeth Tracey Mae Wettlaufer of Woodstock, Ont., who was employed at both facilities, appeared in court on Tuesday, and was remanded into custody.
The victims and the nursing homes where they resided were identified by police as:
James Silcox, 84, Caressant Care – Woodstock
Maurice Granat, 84, Caressant Care – Woodstock
Gladys Millard, 87, Caressant Care – Woodstock
Helen Matheson, 95, Caressant Care – Woodstock
Mary Zurawinski, 96, Caressant Care – Woodstock
Helen Young, 90, Caressant Care – Woodstock
Maureen Pickering, 79, Caressant Care – Woodstock
Arpad Horvath, 75, Meadow Park – London
Woodstock Police Chief William Renton told reporters that, while the police investigation is ongoing, authorities are “confident” that all the victims have been identified.
He added that all family members have been notified.
“On behalf of every police agency represented here today, we extend our deepest sympathies to the families of those who have suffered this tragic loss,” Renton said.
Woodstock police are asking anyone with information relevant to the ongoing investigation to contact them at 519-537-2323 or anonymously through Crime Stoppers at 416-222-TIPS.
Prior to the police news conference, Caressant Care Woodstock Long Term Care spokesperson Lee Griffi said in a statement that the facility is “cooperating fully with police investigating the actions of a former staff member, a registered nurse.”
The nurse in question stopped working at the home approximately two and a half years ago, Griffi added.
The long-term care home remains in “regular contact” with the Ministry of Health and Long-Term care, Griffi said, explaining that their “highest priority” continues to be to provide for the “physical, social and spiritual needs” of its residents.
“We deeply regret the additional grief and stress this is imposing on the families involved,” Griffi said.
In an interview with CTV News Channel on Tuesday, long-term care expert Laura Tamblyn Watts expects, as the case unfolds, there will be many questions about the work history of the accused.
“How long has this person been taking care of older adults?” Tamblyn Watts said. “And have they only been taking care of older adults in long-term care facilities? So is this a case where a person may have also been engaged in other long-term care facilities, or in a home care type environment, often which is quite unregulated.”
She added it will be “interesting” to see if more families come forward “and say, ‘We’ve had care from this person or in this home.’”
Doris Grinspun, the CEO of the Registered Nurses’ Association of Ontario says she’s absolutely “shocked” and “horrified by what has happened.”
In an interview on CTV News Channel, Grinspun sought to assure Canadians that the cases are isolated incidents.
“Please be absolutely assured that every single registered nurse, every single nurse practitioner, every single personal support worker, and anybody that works in nursing homes, goes there every single day with the intent to do not only safe care, but quality care,” Grinspun said.
She added that, until more details about the case are revealed, “it’s difficult for us to explain how something like this could happen.”
Grinspun acknowledged that staffing challenges in nursing homes often make headlines, “but none of that excuses what happened, or justifies or explains even, what happened in this situation.
“And we need to have more details to understand more fully how it evolved the way it evolved.”
In the Ontario legislature on Tuesday morning, Premier Kathleen Wynne called the alleged homicides “extremely distressing.”
During question period, an MPP who represents the London area asked Wynne how the incidents went undetected for 10 years by government authorities.
Wynne said she wouldn’t comment on an ongoing police investigation, but called the case a “tragic” situation for all of the families involved.

http://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/ont-nurse-faces-eight-counts-of-first-degree-murder-1.3130010

Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: jellybean on October 25, 2016, 12:29:22 PM
These deaths were over a 7 year period.  Who brought it to the attention of the police in Sept of this year, was it a co-worker, a family member?

Why did it take so long for these deaths to be brought to the attention of law enforcement.  Were suspicions kept hush hush by the nursing homes?

jb
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: Sap1 on October 25, 2016, 01:24:09 PM
Perhaps she chose the early Spring and Fall to commit her crimes? That is usually when more deaths in the very senior population occur  due to influenza and weakened systems and no one suspected she had a hand in the deaths. Her heinous deeds could have melded in with the flu season.
If she is indeed guilty, she really has put a huge damper on nursing care homes for seniors. It will not only affect the care homes/staff and the families of those she murdered, also many other families whose aging loved ones will be going into these homes, imo.
What a horrible tragedy!!
 
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: Sap1 on October 25, 2016, 01:33:56 PM
I am wondering now how this could not have been caught earlier b/c drugs are counted and accounted for at the end of each shift. Should there be a discrepancy, no one leaves until errors are corrected.
eta: If she was the only one administering medications at night, she could have claimed she dropped meds on the floor and then discarded them to account for a shortage ... yet if that happened on a few occasions I'm surprised she wasn't caught earlier. It is mind boggling how long it took for someone to give a tip.

She had a trigger with her divorce after which the killings began.


http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/police-investigating-suspicious-deaths-linked-to-ontario-nursing-home/article32510299/

A registered nurse has been arrested on allegations that she used drugs to murder eight elderly patients in a string of deaths at long-term-care homes in Southwestern Ontario going back nearly a decade.

A day after her arrest, Elizabeth Wettlaufer, 49, of Woodstock, appeared in the Ontario Court of Justice on Tuesday morning and was remanded into custody. She has been charged with eight counts of first-degree murder, in what is potentially one of the worst cases of serial killing in Canadian history.


Police give details on nurse charged with murder of 8 nursing-home patients (The Globe and Mail)
The victims were administered drugs, said Detective Superintendent Dave Truax of Ontario Provincial Police.

He did not give more details, but he noted that drugs are stored and accessible in nursing homes.

The acts appear to have taken place during overnight shifts.

The indictment filed in court against Ms. Wettlaufer shows that on five occasions, she is alleged to have committed her offences on consecutive days predating the death of a victim.

Earlier this summer, Ms. Wettlaufer posted a picture of herself on Facebook, writing that “Father's day is a great reminder of how blessed I am to still have my Dad alive and able to spend time with me.”

The killings began two months after she started working at the Caressant Care nursing home in Woodstock in June, 2007.

Earlier that year, she had separated from her husband.

Woodstock Police Chief William Renton told reporters that the case started after his department received a detailed tip on Sept. 8 that a nurse was involved in eight slayings.

The investigation involved members of the Woodstock Police Service, London Police Service and the OPP.

Chief Renton said local police hadn’t dealt with such a massive homicide case since the 2006 mass slaying of eight members of the Bandidos biker gang.

According to her LinkedIn profile, Ms. Wettlaufer obtained a bachelor’s degree in counselling from London Baptist Bible College in 1991 and studied nursing at Conestoga College.

She worked at the Caressant nursing home in Woodstock for nearly seven years, until 2014, when she worked for a year at the Meadow Park home in London.

Ms. Wettlaufer, who has been a registered nurse since June, 1995, resigned from the College of Nurses of Ontario on Sept. 30, the day after police received the tip about the case.

The college said her record did not show any disciplinary action against her.

Seven of the victims died at the Caressant home from 2007 to 2014. They have been identified as 84-year-old James Silcox, 84-year-old Maurice (Moe) Granat, 95-year-old Helen Matheson, 87-year-old Gladys Millard, 96-year-old Mary Zurawinski, 90-year-old Helen Young and 79-year-old Maureen Pickering.
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: jellybean on October 25, 2016, 02:59:58 PM
On her facebook page she had three cats.  Someone commented on them, and she replied that she still has the black one, but the other two passed away. They looked fine to me.

Even if I did not know, what we have learned today...
It still struck me in an odd way/
It had been suggested by someone being interviewed on cbc, that perhaps this nurse felt that she  was peforming a mercy killing, believing that these patients suffered long enough.


Interesting about "the detailed tip". Perhaps a coroner brought this to the attention of the police?  The bodies will not be exhumed, apparently.
jb
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: jellybean on October 25, 2016, 04:05:51 PM
https://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2016/10/25/ontario-nursing-home-murder-suspect-cuts-happy-figure-on-social-media.html

Ontario nursing home murder suspect talked God and sobriety on social media posts
Elizabeth Tracey Mae Wettlaufer, 49, who has been charged with 8 counts of first-degree murder and arrested, also mentions pets and recipes in her posts.

Elizabeth Tracey Mae Wettlaufer cuts a happy figure on Facebook, most of the time. There are plenty of mentions of God, multiple photos of cats and a few dogs, and lots of recipes.

Then there’s the passage where the multiple murder suspect describes what appears to be her battle with alcoholism.

“My own voice called to me in the darkness,” Wettlaufer, 49, wrote on Sept. 28, 2015. “Other hands lifted me when I chose the light. One year ago today I woke up not dead. 365 days clean and sober.”

There are also a few mentions of loneliness. She was divorced about eight years ago, according to a former neighbour. Her ex-husband Dan Wettlaufer, a truck driver, still lives in the little white bungalow they once shared.

When he opened the back door of his home, Dan said he would not be talking. Asked if he knew any details, he replied: “I don’t know, myself. I’m not going to speak on it at all.”

Her former next-door neighbour, a chatty 92-year-old woman, described Wettlaufer as a friendly person. She said she was shocked by the news of her arrest.

“Oh, for crissakes, I can’t believe it,” she said. “As far as I know she was okay — I had no problems with her.”

She said she knew Wettlaufer and her husband as “good Baptists.”


“I saw the news and I was just flabbergasted,” the elderly former neighbour said. “I never thought such a thing. Never.”

There’s also a photo of a woman wading in water with the saying: “Don’t be afraid of growing older. You’ll still do stupid things… only slower.”

Wettlaufer is in custody facing 8 counts of first-degree murder. The victims were patients at the Woodstock and London longterm care nursing homes where she once worker, police say.

Police won’t say if she has been sent for a psychological assessment.

The police probe on her began on Sept. 29 after a tip from someone in the public, police said at a news conference on Tuesday.

The Woodstock resident once used the last name “Parker.”

On LinkedIn, she described herself as a registered nurse with a specialty in wellness and fitness.

She listed her experience as working at Caressant Care Nursing Home from June 2007 to March 2014.

She described her work there as: “Assessing patients Administering medications. Performing prescribed treatments. Communicating with patients, families and health care professionals. Supervising care staff. Generating and maintaining patient care plans. Updating patient charts. Processing Dr.s orders.”


Her LinkedIn profile also listed less than a year of employment at Meadow Park nursing home in London in 2014.

She said she was employed at the Meadow Park Nursing Home for less than a year in 2014 and said she worked as a “charge nurse.”

She did not detail her responsibilities there or her reasons for leaving either job.

The LinkedIn profile also showed a bachelor’s degree in counselling from the London Baptist Bible College.

She wrote in LinkedIn that she had a 90 per cent average while studying nursing from 1992 to 1995 at Connestoga College.

She listed a Woodstock apartment as her address when she applied for a loan to buy a 2009 Ford Flex for $21,584.

On Facebook, she portrays herself as someone with a strong and loving family.

On June 16, she posted a photo of her with a man she said is her father and the message: “Fathers day is a great reminder of how blessed I am to still have my Dad alive and able to spend time with me.”

There’s also a picture of her smiling in a field, looking about thirteen years old.

“Picking potatoes,” the entry says. “My boots match my jacket.”

There are also hints of loneliness, like in a post from last Valentines Day. It shows a cat in front of a plate of food and the words, “Me on Valentines Day.”

And there’s a post of her career heading in a new direction on Nov. 13, 2015 that reads: “Me, a pediatric shift nurse. Who’d have predicted that?”
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: Sap1 on October 25, 2016, 04:37:52 PM
So sad and tragic all the way around.

JB, with mention of the cats, wasn't she a bit too old to be a budding SK?

Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: jellybean on October 25, 2016, 06:31:03 PM
If found guilty, technically she would be a serial killer - to my mind the killings were all done the same way - and in the same type of environment, and to the same age group. 

Questions will be asked and hopefully answers will be given.
I wonder if she,  in a sick way,  felt that she was doing them a service by taking them out of their misery- (as she perceived it to be) or if she perceived these seniors as complainers and trouble makers, and created too much work?

In any event - the woman is "not well". imo

jb
ps A long time ago, a nurse in a hospital in Toronto did the same thing. It was the first big case of its kind.  I can't recall the details, but I believe it was children, in her case.  Not sure.
if it was children or not.

I think that the present lady in question probably "took care of the two cats" - as three were a nuisance. Chose to keep the BLACK CAT.
That's just me!!

jb
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: jellybean on October 25, 2016, 07:12:16 PM
http://news.nationalpost.com/news/canada/former-ontario-nursing-home-worker-focus-of-multi-jurisdictional-death-investigation-company-says

snippets taken from the National Post

 An Ontario nurse who once wrote a poem describing the “sharp thirst” of a serial killer has been charged with murdering eight elderly patients in her care.

and -

The deaths took place between August 2007 and August 2014.

and -

But poetry posted under the pseudonym Betty Weston but copyrighted to Bethe Wettlaufer on allpoetry.com includes verses that are far less lighthearted.

One gruesome poem titled Inevitable, is written from the perspective of a serial killer. One graphic line from that poem reads: “Heart beats then sprays/as this next victim pays/her deft dagger’s bill.”

and -

Before she worked at Caressant Care, Wettlaufer worked at Christian Horizons, a faith-based charitable organization that works with people with developmental disabilities.

and -

Charlene Puffer, who lives down the hall from Wettlaufer’s fifth-floor apartment, described her neighbour as a decent person.

Puffer said Wettlaufer told her she liked her job as a nurse.

Another apartment resident who considered Wettlaufer a friend, Nancy Gilbert, said the nurse recently told her she had just gotten out of rehab, for the second time.
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: Sap1 on October 26, 2016, 01:38:52 AM
Oh of course she will go down as a serial killer. I just wondered about the killing of the cats and whether it was recent ... from cats to humans like a budding serial killer.

Those snippets from National Post are creepy! How did anyone not see this coming? Especially after she posts her poems on the Net.

Rehab ... some reports claim she struggled with alcohol addiction.  I wonder if that is the reason she had so many places of employment after she left the nursing home.

On her FB she sported this T-shirt:

Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: RubyRose on October 26, 2016, 11:40:29 AM
My first thought was that, due to the nature of her work, it could very well be mercy killings or at least what she perceived as mercy killings.  Whatever the motivation I don't think there is any question that she suffers from deep psychological problems.  Very tragic for everyone concerned.  She appeared to have so much potential to do good.  I doubt she started out that way.
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: Have faith on October 26, 2016, 11:48:56 AM
This is an interesting article which may explain the psychology behind this type of killer.  Pretty scary.

http://www.lfpress.com/2016/10/25/workers-often-have-delusions-of-being-a-hero-by-ending-suffering-michael-arntfield-says

The killing starts out of compassion, it continues out of compulsion.

The health-care killer, a documented category of serial killer, is a rare type of criminal, says a Western University criminology professor who studies murderers and their motives.

“They’re still not very well understood,” said Michael Arntfield, a former London police officer who wrote the bestseller Murder City, a study of a spate of serial murders in the London area over four decades.

Forty-one cases of health-care killers have been documented in the United States since 1970, he said, and none he knows of in Canada.

The American case of Donald Harvey, known as the Angel of Death, first sparked investigations into the prevalence of health-care homicides, Arntfield said.

Harvey murdered nearly 60 people while working as an orderly in various hospitals between 1970 and his arrest in 1987 usually by administering drugs.

The majority of 40 other known cases, Arntfield said, have occurred in hospitals and usually involved nurses using drugs often undetectable such as potassium chloride or certain respiratory drugs only available at hospitals.

Murders in seniors’ home are the most rare — only eight in the literature — and are usually committed by nurses aides. Often, Arntfield said, they are team killings involving two people. Most often they involve asphyxiation.

The cases largely go undetected. Often, in the death of an elderly person, an autopsy isn’t ordered, or, if they are, they don’t screen for the certain drugs used to cause the deaths, he said.

Those convicted are an even split between men and women, with a smattering more women convicted.

Arntfield said that initially they suffer from “Mother Teresa syndrome,” a variation of a narcissistic personality disorder “where these people have some delusions of being a hero or a saviour.

“(They) feel the need to intervene or intercede in someone’s suffering even if they’re making no complaints about it or even if they’re not necessarily palliative,” he said.

Often, the killing “may begin with someone who is terminal and they see themselves genuinely as ending their misery,” Arntfield said.

“Then what happens is they become less and less selective about who they kill.”

Arntfield said the killers look for those who have “do not resuscitate” orders or are unlikely to have an autopsy.

The initial compassion “becomes compulsive,” he said. Some convicted killers have told researchers “there is some thrill of being part of the emergency or the drama that they cause.

“It is . . . ultimately about the perception of power and playing God.”

The cases are difficult to investigate because there are no living witnesses, or, in the case of seniors’ homes, they are often people who suffer from Alzheimer’s and dementia.

“They’re very shrewd in terms of who they select, when they do it,” Arntfield said. “There’s significant pre-meditation that goes into it and tremendous planning and organization.”

Ultimately, he said, it’s “about choosing who lives and who dies.”

Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: Sap1 on October 26, 2016, 12:05:06 PM
Interesting article HaveFaith. Thanks for that.

I've been thinking ... she had already terminated her RN's license by the time police apprehended her. The apprehension was rather quick after police received the detailed tip. Certainly too quick for a detailed and complete investigation on the 8 seniors deaths.

Did she herself give the tip since she may have felt her life spiraling out of control? Or for reasons of sudden remorse? Her prior jobs were lengthy but in later years she has been having several jobs in a short period of time. Some rehab figures in there too although there is no history in her records she had any disciplines.
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: Ron on October 26, 2016, 12:42:59 PM
I think the people at CAMH are the ones who alerted police.








CAMH staff alerted police about former nurse now charged in Woodstock killings


Staff at Toronto's Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) alerted police about information provided by the former nurse charged with first-degree murder in the deaths of eight nursing-home patients in southwestern Ontario, a source has confirmed to CBC News.

On Tuesday, police in Woodstock, Ont., announced that Elizabeth Tracy Mae Wettlaufer, 49, has been charged in connection with the deaths that occurred between August 2007 and August 2014. The victims were between 75 and 96 years old.

    Former nurse killed 8 elderly patients, police allege
    Who is Elizabeth Wettlaufer? What we know so far about accused in nursing-home deaths

Police would not say exactly how they died, except that seven of them received a fatal dose of a drug.

A source with knowledge of the investigation told CBC News on Wednesday that CAMH phoned Toronto police in September about information Wettlaufer provided about the deaths of patients.

Because the allegations did not involve any Toronto residents, the force alerted other police agencies.

A spokesperson for CAMH declined to comment early Wednesday afternoon.

Wettlaufer worked for Caressant Care Nursing and Retirement Homes, which operates six facilities in southwestern Ontario. Seven residents died at the company's nursing home in Woodstock, Ont., a small community of about 37,000 residents 140 kilometres southwest of Toronto.

Wettlaufer also worked at the Meadow Park home in London, Ont., which is where the eighth resident died.

Caressant Care said Tuesday that Wettlaufer left the company two and a half years ago and that the company is "co-operating fully with police."

Meadow Park said Wettlaufer left its employment two years ago and also confirmed that it is co-operating with the police probe.
Nursing Home Probe 20161025

Elizabeth Tracey Mae Wettlaufer, of Woodstock, Ont., is shown in this still image taken from video provided by Citynews Toronto in Woodstock on Oct. 25, 2016. (Citynews Toronto/Canadian Press)

Police identified the victims from the Woodstock home as:

    James Silcox, 84, who died Aug. 17, 2007.
    Maurice Granat, 84, who died Dec. 23, 2007.
    Gladys Millard, 87, who died Oct. 14, 2011.
    Helen Matheson, 95, who died Oct. 27, 2011.
    Mary Zurawinski, 96, who died Nov. 7, 2011.
    Helen Young, 90, who died July 14, 2013.
    Maureen Pickering, 79, who died March 28, 2014.

The victim from Meadow Park was identified as:

    Arpad Horvath, 75, who died Aug. 31, 2014.

According to her professional profile at the College of Nurses of Ontario website, Wettlaufer first registered as a nurse on June 8, 1995. She resigned on Sept. 30, 2016, one day after the OPP said their investigation began.

Wettlaufer is under investigation by the College and no longer entitled to practice, the governing body for nurses, practical nurses and nurse practitioners confirmed Tuesday.
Accused active online

On Tuesday, neighbours called news of the charges "shocking" and described Wettlaufer as friendly and unassuming.

"We would chat and have laughs," said Derek Gilbert, who lives in the same apartment building as Wettlaufer. "She seemed like an everyday, normal kind of person."

Wettlaufer was active on social media, posting pictures of her travels and her family on Facebook.
wdr-Elizabeth-Wettlaufer

Elizabeth Tracy Mae Wettlaufer is facing eight first-degree murder charges in the deaths of elderly patients in southwestern Ontario. (Bethe Wettlaufer/Facebook)

She also wrote several posts about her work as a nurse.
wdr-Elizabeth Wettlaufer-Facebook Post

This post appeared on a Facebook page Woodstock police confirmed to belong to Elizabeth Tracy Mae Wettlaufer, the woman facing eight first-degree murder charges.

She also appears to have contributed several poems to a site called allpoetry.com.

The profile name is bettyweston, but her own name is also attached to the poems, and the accompanying photo is one that appears on Wettlaufer's Facebook page.

Links to the poems are not currently working.

One poem titled Inevitable, written about five years ago, talks about taking a life:

She watches some life drain from the notch in his neck vein.

As it soothingly pools it smothers her pain.

Sweet stiletto so sharp craves another cut.

Obeying a call she moves to his gut.

Blade traces a line from navel to spine

grating on rib bones slicing intestine.

Another poem titled Working Happy, from about six years ago, focuses on her care for the elderly:

Maybe it's the rye or the time of night but my day was not so bad.

Filled with work and satisfaction and old people.

See I work with old people and I love their candidacy,

their points, their wrinkles, their frailties their refusing to eat anything but ice cream, even their smell.

With files from Alex Brockman

          
       http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/woodstock-nurse-investigation-1.3822235
          
       
          
       
          
       
          
       
       
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: RubyRose on October 26, 2016, 01:08:02 PM
Thank you for posting the article, Have Faith.  Quite the eye-opener.  Makes you wonder just how many more of these (not in this particular case, perhaps, although there could be more) types and causes of death may have gone undetected in other institutions. It would probably be easy enough to accomplish.
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: Sap1 on October 26, 2016, 02:04:45 PM
Thanks Ron. At least she was admitting her crimes to the counselors at addictions; thank God for that. She also worked with developmentally delayed and children which could include terminally ill or other painful conditions. Investigators have their work cut out for them.

That poetry is just disgustingly dark and morbid for lack of better words. She went from one extreme to another ... light and humorous to very dark places in her mind.

She must have known that counselors cannot keep client confidentiality in cases of abuse, murder, or threats of murder as she took various courses in college on counseling. Even non-professionals know that.
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: jellybean on October 26, 2016, 03:24:09 PM
It is all coming out now.  Her sickness being exposed for everyone to see.  We also know that her drink of choice is rye. I also suspect that she "finished off two of her cats".

How very lonely, isolated, and extremely ill she is. I have a feeling that she wanted to be caught. As a christian she wanted to stop, but could not - unless others forced her to stop.

I have a feeling that she was so tortured, that she had to confess - and she did, thankfully, to a counselor on Addiction.

I saw on television a young man, a neighbour, who said that his neighbour must have been expecting it, as she recently found a home for her dog.

So, she was prepared - and was not surprised when she was arrested. imo

Her defense may be mental illness, but we will see.
Other serial killers did not have that benefit of defense.
I think that her rehab attempts might come into play in this case.
On the other hand, she knew right from wrong, so that type of defense may not fly

This must be causing great anxiety in families who are  considering sending their loved ones into nursing homes.  Something must change, and fast!!.

jb

Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: Sap1 on October 26, 2016, 07:30:55 PM
So it may be insulin she used on the patients.

She knew she would be apprehended. I concur with Jellybean and I do believe she wanted her bizarre dark streak to end.

More from that article:

Quote
Wettlaufer, 49, entered into the peace bond almost three weeks earlier, on Oct. 6.

She signed it after staff at Toronto's Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) alerted Toronto police in September about information provided by the former nurse about the deaths of the patients, as CBC News learned from a source with knowledge of the investigation on Wednesday.

CAMH won't comment on revelations

Under the provincial Coroners Act, there are a number of scenarios in which every citizen must notify a coroner or police of the facts they know surrounding a death. These scenarios include when a death has occurred as a result of violence, misadventure, negligence, misconduct or malpractice, according to the legislation.

It's unclear who at CAMH first contacted police. A spokesman for CAMH declined to comment early Wednesday afternoon.

"To protect the personal health information of our patients, CAMH does not disclose the names of its clients. Nor does CAMH comment on any ongoing police investigations," spokesman Sean O'Malley told CBC News.
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: jellybean on October 26, 2016, 08:15:23 PM
Quote
police in Woodstock, Ont., were concerned that Elizabeth Tracey Mae Wettlaufer would commit a "serious personal injury"

What is meant by that?  She might commit suicide - or serious personal injury to others?

I think they meant to "others", because if it was to herself, she would have been committed.

Thoughts on this....?

jb
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: Have faith on October 26, 2016, 09:48:51 PM
Quote
police in Woodstock, Ont., were concerned that Elizabeth Tracey Mae Wettlaufer would commit a "serious personal injury"

What is meant by that?  She might commit suicide - or serious personal injury to others?

I think they meant to "others", because if it was to herself, she would have been committed.

Thoughts on this....?

jb



Since LE took out a peace bond on her at that time, barring her from nursing homes etc., I think the concern was for other people.
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: Sap1 on October 27, 2016, 09:21:11 AM
Quote
Family members of several victims said police investigators informed them that the killings were done to patients who “pissed (Elizabeth) Wettlaufer off.” Some family members have described their loved ones falling into a sudden coma before dying.

Shaking my head! Clashing of personalities can happen in any setting, so seniors may not have been the only victims? My heart goes out to all those patients and families who have been victims of this nurse. she has no excuses for her behavior and as someone else mentioned, she knew right from wrong. First degree murder is appropriate, imo.
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: jellybean on October 27, 2016, 11:04:29 AM
Quote
from article:  killings were done to patients who “pissed (Elizabeth) Wettlaufer off.”

Quote
I wonder if she,  in a sick way,  felt that she was doing them a service by taking them out of their misery- (as she perceived it to be) or if she perceived these seniors as complainers and trouble makers, and created too much work?

Close enough.  It had to be one of the two.

The poor seniors remaining in these homes. I can't begin to think how terrified they must be, when a nurse approaches them for treatment.

As to other positions, I wonder if she was asked to leave  due to her drinking?

jb


Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: jellybean on October 27, 2016, 03:31:11 PM
Thank you Long Gone;

Article cont...

She knew Wettlaufer, 49, had experienced tough times and had suffered addiction and mental illness . . . but murder?

About a week and a half later, Wettlaufer texted again to say she was being “escorted back to Woodstock” by police, the acquaintance said.

The Woodstock woman assumed Wettlaufer made up the story. She even told a mutual acquaintance, expressing disbelief. It couldn’t be true, she thought. If someone confessed to eight killings, she certainly wouldn’t have access to her cellphone.

A day after news broke this week that police had charged Wettlaufer with eight counts of first-degree murder in the deaths of nursing home residents in Woodstock and London, the Woodstock woman said she’s still rattled.

“When my friend sent me a link to the news (about the charges) I was like, ‘Oh my God,’” she said.

“Why didn’t I say something? I keep thinking I should have gone to police . . . but I really didn’t believe her,” she said. “The whole thing has me so sick.”

“It really rattles me, when I start to think about it,” she said.

She said she had known Wettlaufer, who doted on her dog and her parents, for years.

By Wednesday, as questions continued to swirl around the investigation — with families of the dead asking what led police to conclude their relatives had been killed, some more than eight years ago — reports surfaced that police had been tipped off by staff of a mental health centre in Toronto.

Officials from the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) alerted Toronto police that Wettlaufer had shared information with hospital staff that caused them “concern,” a police source familiar with the investigation said Wednesday.

 

The source said once Toronto police received the information from the hospital, officers interviewed Wettlaufer and found out that the alleged crimes had occurred outside Toronto police’s jurisdiction.

That’s when Toronto police passed the information to the Ontario Provincial Police and police forces in Woodstock and London, said the source, who was not authorized to discuss the case publicly.

The investigation into the alleged murders was launched on Sept. 29. Wettlaufer was arrested on Monday and appeared in an Woodstock courthouse on Tuesday where she was remanded into custody.

The nursing home residents have been identified as James Silcox, 84, Maurice Granat, 84, Gladys Millard, 87, Helen Matheson, 95, Mary Zurawinski, 96, Helen Young, 90, Maureen Pickering, 79, Arpad Horvath, 75.

Lawyers for Wettlaufer could not immediately be reached for comment.

CAMH declined to comment, saying they do not disclose information about their clients due to patient confidentiality.

However, a peace bond Wettlaufer entered into earlier in the month required her to “continue any treatment for mental health” with any physician to whom she was referred by her family doctor or “representatives of CAMH.”

Wettlaufer was also not allowed to possess or consume alcohol and had to obey a curfew and reside in either her apartment or with her parents in Woodstock between 7 p.m. and 6 a.m., except to attend alcoholics anonymous meetings, according to terms laid out in the peace bond.

Wettlaufer’s friend, Nancy Gilbert, told The Canadian Press that Wettlaufer had told her she recently completed her second stint in rehab in Toronto and seemed to be in good spirits.

A Facebook page for a Bethe Wettlaufer, whose photo, education and employment records match that of Elizabeth Wettlaufer, makes reference to what appears to be a struggle with substance abuse.

“My own voice called to me in the darkness. Others hands lifted me when I chose the light. One year ago today I woke up not dead. 365 days clean and sober,” says a post from September 2015.

While health-care professionals are generally bound by patient confidentiality requirements, they are obliged in some cases to contact police or other authorities without a patient’s consent, such as in cases where they believe a death is suspicious or other important interests are at stake.

Ontario law, for example, mandates that doctors must contact authorities if they have reasonable grounds to suspect that a resident of a nursing or retirement home has suffered harm or is at risk of harm due to “improper or incompetent treatment or care, unlawful conduct, abuse or neglect.”

“Physicians have a legal and professional obligation to maintain the confidentiality of patient information,” Ontario’s doctor licensing body says. “There are circumstances, however, where physicians are either required or permitted to report particular events or clinical conditions to the appropriate government or regulatory agency.”

Wettlaufer is scheduled to appear in court by video on Nov. 2. None of the charges have been proven in court.

with files from Canadian Press
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: Ron on October 27, 2016, 05:53:43 PM
Senior abuse is not limited to nursing homes. I t is time for tougher laws to protect vulnerable seniors.


http://www.theifp.ca/news-story/6933245-georgetown-man-charged-after-senior-found-in-deplorable-conditions-/





A 63-year-old man has been charged with allegedly failing to provide the necessities of life after an elderly woman was found to have been improperly cared for earlier this month.

On Oct. 5, Halton Region Paramedic Services was summoned to a Georgetown address by Community Care and Access Centre staff to assess a 91-year-old female client requiring medical assistance.

The female patient was subsequently transported to Georgetown Hospital.

It was determined that the victim was suffering from the ill effects of not receiving proper care. She was malnourished, weak, unkempt and had been residing in soiled linens and clothing.

Halton Regional Police was contacted and the One District Criminal Investigations Bureau conducted an investigation.

As a result, a man from Georgetown was arrested and charged on Tuesday with failing to provide the necessities of life. 

"The elderly victim was found living in deplorable conditions. This was an excellent example of teamwork and collaboration between the internal resources of the police service and external partners,” said Det. Sgt. Dave Costantini.

"More importantly, because of this collaboration a vulnerable member of our community has been rescued from unthinkable conditions and I am happy to report she is expected to make a full recovery."

Section 215 of the Criminal Code of Canada says it is an offence if an individual fails to provide necessaries of life to a person under his or her charge.

Specifically subsection (C)(i) states, "if that person is unable, by reason of detention, age, illness, mental disorder or other cause, to withdraw himself from that charge."

"This means it is a criminal offence if you do not provide the necessary care to someone that is in your care and that cannot leave your care due to their age, illness or other cause,” Costantini added.

“The necessaries of life refer to those things necessary to preserve life, such as food, shelter, medical attention and protection from harm."

Anyone who may have information that would assist investigators in this case are encouraged to contact Det. Const. Sarah McCullagh – Seniors Liaison Investigator at 905-878-5511 ext. 2419 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 (TIPS), or through the web at www.haltoncrimestoppers.com, or by texting "Tip201" with your message to 274637 (crimes).

 
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: jellybean on October 28, 2016, 12:15:22 PM
Quoted from article in post #31

Quote
Meanwhile, an anonymous letter sent to CTV News claims that “a lot of med errors" were reported regarding insulin at the Woodstock facility but “nothing done.” The hand-written letter states that Wettlaufer “had a long list of disciplines” at the nursing home and that she was told by administration “if she went quietly they would not call the college (of nurses).”
CTV News has not independently verified the letter’s claims.

This is often true.  They are asked to leave quietly. Facilities keep things quiet to better serve their reputation. As she moves on to another facility - it becomes their problem - no longer theirs.

The same applies, to teachers,priests, doctors - the list goes on.


jb



Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: jobo on October 28, 2016, 03:21:40 PM
Have to agree with you, jellybean.
As far as I can see....Carresant care needs to be charged for not following protocol. 
Med errors and Med counts should be taken seriously. They should have been documented and followed up...not that hard to do.
Whoever was in charge of that should lose their job as they're incompetent.



Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: Sap1 on October 28, 2016, 04:05:48 PM
ITA Jobo! And I agree with Jellybean's reply as well. I've seen it happen myself and I did report to a superior regarding a new employee where I was working at the time. Then drug errors began happening on her shift almost immediately. Initially I felt badly b/c I felt I was gossiping but my intuition was true. I hadn't seen her in 15 years but she didn't last long at her new employment. Drug errors can happen easily but when it's the same person each time, something needs doing. At our University of Alberta hospital ... after one drug error, the staffer gets an hour long questioning and has to do a complete calculation test. I agree with that.
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: jellybean on October 28, 2016, 05:52:25 PM
It is very difficult to call a person out....there is alot of angst that goes with it - but is usually the right step to take, especially in a hospital setting.
Nurses for the most part have high ethics, imo, thank heavens.

I have questions:  Supposing a patient is on pain medication, and refuses to take it.
The paper work would have already been done, ie - properly checked out.
Then, what does a nurse do?  I think that this is where a hole in the system might exist.

Nurse could take it themselves...

When a patient requires more painkillers than prescribed - can a nurse give them the extra pill, and check it out properly with the reason why?
Or would she have to obtain approval at all times?
Are nurses given some latitude at such times?

Thanks

jb
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: Sap1 on October 29, 2016, 12:30:14 AM
Quote
Supposing a patient is on pain medication, and refuses to take it.
The paper work would have already been done, ie - properly checked out.
Then, what does a nurse do?  I think that this is where a hole in the system might exist.

Then it is taken back to the medication room and double checked (and wasted) or it can be disposed of in the patients room where there is a receptacle that cannot be accessed by any other patient ... as long as the nurse has a witness to sign for a wastage. Most prefer to waste it in the medication room.

Quote
Nurse could take it themselves...

Yes, there is room for that if one is unscrupulous. However they risk the chance of getting caught if the patient decides later that they want the medication. Whomever they ask for the pain medication would check on the patients medication list on the Computer and would see that it was given and tell the patient, "you already were given the medication" and if the patient was not confused, would claim they refused it before. The nurse would then be approached to make sure she either gave it or wasted it before and failed to record it on the patient med list on the computer. 

Quote
When a patient requires more painkillers than prescribed - can a nurse give them the extra pill, and check it out properly with the reason why?

No. There has to be a Doctor or Resident Doctor to assess the patient first as to why more analgesic is necessary or if there could be other issues happening.

Quote
Or would she have to obtain approval at all times?

Absolutely.

Quote
Are nurses given some latitude at such times?

There are certain things nurses have more latitude for in ICU's, ER's, however still under the guidance of Doctors usual routines in those cases.
Only Nurse Practitioners are allowed to prescribe or change medications, other than Doctors.
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: jellybean on October 29, 2016, 11:58:31 AM
Quote
Supposing a patient is on pain medication, and refuses to take it.
The paper work would have already been done, ie - properly checked out.
Then, what does a nurse do?  I think that this is where a hole in the system might exist.

Then it is taken back to the medication room and double checked (and wasted) or it can be disposed of in the patients room where there is a receptacle that cannot be accessed by any other patient ... as long as the nurse has a witness to sign for a wastage. Most prefer to waste it in the medication room.

Quote
Nurse could take it themselves...

Yes, there is room for that if one is unscrupulous. However they risk the chance of getting caught if the patient decides later that they want the medication. Whomever they ask for the pain medication would check on the patients medication list on the Computer and would see that it was given and tell the patient, "you already were given the medication" and if the patient was not confused, would claim they refused it before. The nurse would then be approached to make sure she either gave it or wasted it before and failed to record it on the patient med list on the computer. 

Quote
When a patient requires more painkillers than prescribed - can a nurse give them the extra pill, and check it out properly with the reason why?

No. There has to be a Doctor or Resident Doctor to assess the patient first as to why more analgesic is necessary or if there could be other issues happening.

Quote
Or would she have to obtain approval at all times?

Absolutely.

Quote
Are nurses given some latitude at such times?

There are certain things nurses have more latitude for in ICU's, ER's, however still under the guidance of Doctors usual routines in those cases.
Only Nurse Practitioners are allowed to prescribe or change medications, other than Doctors.

Thanks SAP
I did not know that a Nurse Practitioners had more authority than a Nurse.
I learn something new every day. :)

jb

Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: Sap1 on October 29, 2016, 03:36:16 PM
YW. Nurse Practitioners have only been around a few years and are underutilized but they are gaining ground.

http://www.albertahealthservices.ca/careers/Page11731.aspx
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: jobo on October 29, 2016, 05:37:44 PM
I go to a Nurse Practitioner here in Ontario.  I really like her and if need be, she can refer me back to my doctor.
Good way for the government to save money in health care.
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: Sap1 on October 29, 2016, 08:18:31 PM
I go to a Nurse Practitioner here in Ontario.  I really like her and if need be, she can refer me back to my doctor.
Good way for the government to save money in health care.

It really is. These RN's are trained under Doctor's ... advanced studies. We need more out there.
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: Sap1 on October 31, 2016, 11:17:18 AM
OMG! This video came in my timeline. Elder abuse can happen anywhere in the world, however this video was captured in Ontario.

https://youtu.be/Xukq1goo66k
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: Sap1 on November 02, 2016, 11:53:32 AM
For years Ontario's healthcare system has been hit hard by illegals. This is an older article, however, I was told by Americans that this filching of free services from Canada will have stopped or at least down graded since Obamacare came in, in USA. Of course not everyone could get Obamacare either b/c of wages. So I am assuming that the filching is still ongoing. It has happened in Alberta as well that I know of but Ontario has been hard hit, leaving quite a shortage of finances for Canadians needing care. Nursing homes unfortunately are feeling the brunt more than hospitals.

http://www.nytimes.com/1993/12/20/world/americans-filching-free-health-care-in-canada.html?pagewanted=all
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: jellybean on November 02, 2016, 11:58:02 AM
I have a few sad stories to tell as well.  First hand observation with a loved one who resided in a facility. In my own case, my brother could speak up for himself, but I must say it was not appreciated. 

I had to advocate for him, and work things out as best I could.

First thing that goes out the window, with the clients is their dignity, their self respect and their pride. It has nothing to do with their condition, imo, it is the way that they are treated on a daily basis. Even in the tone of some of the workers when they address the clients, is harsh.

Of course these same workers were as sweet as apple pie when I was present.
But unknown to them, I overheard and observed how they treated other clients when I was there..... you can figure it out from there.

He was not an impossible person either. He was not a complainer. Very easy to get along with. His concerns were real.  However, they were brushed aside.

It was obvious to me that some staff took the position that it was a job, any job is better than nothing. These places think nothing of kicking clients out either, with no other facility lined up.
I am only lightly touching on my experiences.  Some things are best to leave alone, on my part.

Our hospitals are crowded - emergency wards flooded with patients and understaffed.The nurses were stressed out, and who can blame them.

I have had first hand experience with that too - 3 months ago.

This is not an Ontario problem, it is a National problem.

Speaking of hospitals, I see the Shriners are raising funds for theirs.
They do wonderful work.  The Shriners are Masons.

jb
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: jellybean on November 02, 2016, 07:05:20 PM
Oh boy, how they can cover their behinds. Just as I thought, get her out of their facility, and let her become another employers problem.

I am thinking that she went to work half lit, reeking of booze and perhaps tippling in the staff washroom cubicle.  Warned many times, and let go..... then onward to greener fields to repeat it over and over again.

Not for one minute suspecting that she was murdering any of their patients.
Heavens No!! It was her drinking, and her combative manner. :-X

This woman sadly, needed more help than she could receive from an Addiction Facility.
As horrible as it is - she obviously wanted to stop her killing spree - and told an addiction counsellor.   I have to give her credit for that much.
Without her confession, she would still be free.

As she sat in court and heard the charges read out to her, she asked.
"Is that it?"
Makes one wonder.... Those three words can be interpreted in a number of ways....

jb
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: Sap1 on November 03, 2016, 11:34:55 AM
It sounds deplorable all the way around in Ontario seniors care. What other provinces are going through the same? Perhaps staff could do a visit to those hospitals and nursing homes where care runs more smoothly? I've seen that done by a group of nursing staff from a small town in Alberta ... a group  of various healthcare workers attended at various busy city (Edmonton) hospitals to view the care standards in patient care.
One Extendicare facility in a small town had it down pat. Even if they were short workers, they made it work. If a patient can do their own oral care, even slowly, they were set up at a sink, and while they also needed a foot bath for diabetic care .... that was done at the same time as they sit at the sink in their wheelchair. Meanwhile, the care worker goes on and gets another patient set up to do the same. It's not rocket science to get organized. It means a bit of extra footwork but so be it. At least the patient will feel better and feel more useful if they can do something for themselves, rather than becoming completely dependent and atrophied.
Two Auxiliary nursing care stations attached to hospitals in different towns had the same routines. In these places, soiled personal care products never stayed on a patient for hours b/c there was a routine ... toileting, cleansing, clean products, to breakfast, then toileting again, and on to whatever activities that were given patients. In a couple hours pretty well the same routine. Sure it's busy but it's workable. Staff can sit and relax at the breakfast, lunch and dinner tables while they assist patients with eating. Staff are, or should be there for the patient, not the dollar. Money helps but I think people have lost sight of what is really important. There also needs to be encouragement from the top ... administration. The elderly require a lot of stimulation so there also needs to be Occupational and Physical therapy provided according to specific needs. Problem is, oft times the top (administration) is heavy when it doesn't need to be, and that extra money can provide therapists for the elderly.
Sharing responsibilities also works well. In one long term facility, the nurse doing all the medications would get them ready from bubble packs (which is quite easy), would crush those needed to be crushed, and then runs out and starts a couple baths scheduled for the day, while the floor nursing staff do the bed baths and other care. The med nurse didn't need to do the baths as it wasn't in her job description but it was started and worked out well for the whole team. Everyone felt the pride that good care was accomplished. Then it was even possible for the whole team to sit and do a team report on any changes in patient status.
Organization and a caring attitude is what is required. There should be no need for one worker to lift a heavy patient alone. That needs to be discussed prior to beginning the day ... "meet me at rooms such and such for a lift assist at such a time" and what has happened with the electronic lifts that most places have? Lack of organization is often a very real reason that causes patients to suffer. My thoughts for whatever they are worth. :)   
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: jellybean on November 03, 2016, 12:55:39 PM
Thank you SAP.  There is still hope in that it can be done.

First - your wonderful examples shows the staff had two smart things going for them.

One - Team Work ( they did not let their job descriptions get in the way)

Two - A Can Do and Let's Do It Attitude.

Three - Well thought out to Achieve their Goals and then got down to Organizing it together.
WOW!!

jb
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: jellybean on November 03, 2016, 07:57:06 PM
Quote
“Be there all the time, watch what happens or they will go through the cracks,” said the RPN, who has worked years in hospital and long-term care facilities.

Not always possible, families do have their work and their lives, but otherwise - Sadly, perhaps good Advice.

On second thoughts, the very reason for placing your loved one in a long-term facility is because the family cannot give them the care that they need. That is why these facilities exist.

So where is the point? Who is serving who here??
jb
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: Sap1 on November 03, 2016, 08:10:15 PM
Most other countries are bare bones at the top of chain, while in America the top is heavy with Administrators and their assistants, and then the manager and her assistants who oversee another manager on the unit and so on. They keep cutting at the bottom ... those directly responsible for patient care.

This is a dream for Canada:

Quote
“In Sweden, one personal support worker does everything,” she said.

From getting coffee in the morning, to administering medicine and doing laundry and personal care, one person does it all.

“It is full-on care,” McGregor said. “(The PSW) gets to know the residents really well.”

It would be great to go back to that. In America there is too much wild spending plus waste, whereas Sweden seems to have the best system financially.
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: jellybean on November 03, 2016, 10:29:55 PM
Regarding Sweden: Does that mean that every senior has their own personal care person?
One on one only?

jb
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: Sap1 on November 04, 2016, 10:19:21 AM
Regarding Sweden: Does that mean that every senior has their own personal care person?
One on one only?

jb

I am wondering if this Doctor visited a nursing home/s or private homes. Googling their healthcare system leaves a lot to be desired and it sounds on par with Canada. I had been under the impression that since they have better systems for saving money in other areas such as waste management, that funding may be used for healthcare.
I did private care here, one on one to relieve a regular worker over a weekend. I bathed, gave medications, cooked meals, re-positioned the client every few hours (plus any necessary care) and had a bed in the same room and I would sit and talk with her during her waking hours, watch TV with her, etc. For that I had full wages. Not everyone gets that kind of care here though. She had been in an auto accident which left her mostly paralyzed and her husband divorced her. Her son was a lawyer and a great advocate for her so her finances were such she could afford to stay home with 24 hour care. 

eta:
http://www.swedishhealthcare.com/elderly-care-in-sweden-study-tour/

Interesting.
http://thechronicleherald.ca/careincrisis/1168351-a-better-way-to-care-for-the-aging#.WBy5By0rLos

I doubt this could ever happen in Canada b/c our institutions are really top heavy (extremely high paid executives in administration).

   
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: Sap1 on November 04, 2016, 10:31:01 AM
Quote
“Be there all the time, watch what happens or they will go through the cracks,” said the RPN, who has worked years in hospital and long-term care facilities.


This statement is utterly an oxi-moronic statement .  Loved ones are in the Nursing home because family does not have the time , training and resources needed to provide for their loved one...

I Have a friend living by herself in her own home . She needs home care ..Here is an example of how the system works...One nurse comes to the house to change a bandage on her foot .Then another home care worker comes to put on pressure socks. I do not see the efficiency in having two separate agencies sending two different individuals to her home at two different times each day...

I totally agree but that is the way it happens here in Ab as well. 
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: jellybean on November 08, 2016, 01:39:04 PM
The picture of her in the electric chair.  Too bad it was not plugged in!

Since she is such a pushy, attention demanding person, I am quite certain that an electric chair charged up and ready to go - would definately get the public's attention.

I wonder what her ex-husband Dan, thinks of  this?

jb
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: jellybean on November 08, 2016, 05:30:03 PM
She is "something else"!

I cannot believe how a "loose cannon" could have survived that long, without getting into trouble with the law sooner.

Things like shop lifting for example. Start small and build up from there.

No word of anything like that, no, no - she took the big leap and went for serial murder.... ::)
(Plus, I have a strong feeling she killed two of her own cats)

We Canadians can sure Churn Out some dangerous Weirdos!!

Oh God!! ::)

jb



Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: jellybean on November 08, 2016, 06:17:04 PM
Make what up? That she murdered these people?
Hmm.. if that is your meaning, then she is indeed very sick.
It is only through her confession, that charges were laid..... no autopsies ensued upon the death of these seniors.
Quite possible.....long gone, but I doubt it.


jb
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: jellybean on November 08, 2016, 06:23:30 PM
It has occurred to me that she might not have done any of this...Could be she just made it up to garner some attention . I hope she did make it up..

That would be a good line for her Defense Lawyer to use..... for sure.

jb
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: jellybean on November 08, 2016, 07:00:38 PM
Quote
“She says, ‘Yeah, I got fired from one job for stealing medication, and the other job I got fired for because I was under the...she says, I was high and gave the patient the wrong medication, he almost died,’ and I couldn't believe my ears."

That does it for me.

Why is all of this coming out now?

jb
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: Sap1 on November 09, 2016, 12:13:09 PM
Not all nursing homes are so inadequate as not to notice what staff do to patients. There's really not much they can do either if a staff member seems "off" or "weird" or just "different", but someone should keep an eye out for other behaviors. Problem is, in an earlier article, Wettlaufer stated she did these murders on the night shift and there may only have been herself and a nursing aide for the whole floor. It is usually bare bones staffing at night so it was likely easy for her to do her deeds while the aide was elsewhere.

For awhile I was thinking this may have been an attention thing as well however, the families of the patients noticed a rapid decline to coma in their loved ones. It is not unusual for an elderly patient to be quite ok one day and down the next. Still in my opinion, if the elderly patients had been fairly stable, eating ok and drinking ... that a rapid decline should be investigated. Such as bloodwork drawn, vital signs taken, etc even if they were on a "do not resusitate" order. At any rate, the patients changed condition should have been brought forth to the Doctor who decides what course of action to take ... depending on the patients conditions and specific problems.

Very odd she told a neighbor about her reasons for changing jobs frequently ... makes me think she knew she was out of control and wanted to be caught, since no rehab seemed to work for her. I wonder how long she worked privately in clients homes ... 
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: jellybean on November 09, 2016, 12:20:33 PM
Gives one the impression that nursing homes play fast and loose with  genuine concern for residents. The woman was supposed to be a professional. She should been reported to Le and had her licence to practice revoked long before she uttered her confession.

I have said all along, that staff not up to snuff, are fired, and they just continue on.  These nursing homes are very much to blame as to these deaths. She was fired for stealing drugs for her own use.
They had a responsibility to report her to the RN Association, at the very least.
This would have taken away her credentials, and she would not be able to continue on.

This happens with Dr's in hospitals, dentists, and also in many other fields.

The premise behind this, is some Institutions are ashamed of being exposed as their reputations are at stake.  The possible conclusion of the public being this is not a good place for their loved one, should it be be known, that an RN is stealing drugs and drinking on the job thus it is swept under the rug and the employee is let go.

I agree with SAP, bare bones staff on midnight shift gave her the ample opportunity.
I also wonder about her friends, who did not report it.

There is much blame to go around.  imo

JB

Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: Sap1 on November 09, 2016, 12:40:12 PM
The other thing is that with credentialed staff (licensed) ...one has to have proof when reporting them, other than "she said" and many people just do not want to be involved ... apathy.
I've seen a few investigations going on already and in most cases it was drawn out over a year. It is not a very good feeling to be asked to watch and report on a co-worker. At least in my instance, I was very nervous about it. The person we were asked to keep an eye on was a great nurse whom Admin thought was under some influence at work, whether alcohol, medications or both. So when working together I would watch her routine ... rounds first and patient care ... then she would go to her purse take something out and soon she had a styrofoam cup with a drink. When she answered a patient call bell, I smelled the drink but could not detect alcohol and short of tasting it, could not make a judgement.
Wttlaufer may have been on observation, but the fact that the care homes let it slide when she found other employment were lacking in good judgement.
I agree JB, the care home Admin/staff should shoulder the blame too.
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: lostlinganer on December 08, 2016, 11:58:43 AM
This excuse for a "nurse" imo should be thrown to the lions (the victims' loved ones left behind).  I cannot imagine any other way of her getting just deserves.
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: Have faith on December 14, 2016, 01:22:16 PM

Here is a similar case to Wettlaufer's,of an Australian nursing home "team leader" who used insulin overdoses to kill two residents, and attempt a third. He had also moved from place to place due to complaints and dismissals. The home's record keeping of medicines was lax, and a civil suit against the home claiming negligence is planned.

The killer, who pled not guilty, was sentenced to 40 years. It will interesting to see how Canadian justice measures up to Australian.

Sentencing: Dec. 2016 (40 years)
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-12-13/nsw-nursing-home-killer-garry-davis-jailed-for-40-years-murder/8115392

 Found guilty: Sept. 2016
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-09-28/nursing-home-employee-garry-davis-found-guilty-of-murder/7883704

Denied bail: Dec. 2014
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-12-19/nurse-refused-bail-over-alleged-nursing-home-double-murder-in-n/5979942
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: Have faith on December 14, 2016, 01:36:20 PM

Debbie, is it feasible to have a board which has Elizabeth Wettlaufer's name in the subject title, and a reference to nursing home deaths, or something similar? Now that she has been charged, people may look for her specific case on the forum. 
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: debbiec on December 14, 2016, 01:50:53 PM
That sounds like a good idea Have Faith. Would you like to start it?
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: Have faith on December 14, 2016, 02:06:22 PM
That sounds like a good idea Have Faith. Would you like to start it?

Since Ron started this one, he may like to either change the subject name on this one, or start another one for E.W.  It's up to you Ron.  :)
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: debbiec on December 14, 2016, 06:20:32 PM
Sounds good. I'm sure he'll see this when he logs on.
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: Ron on December 14, 2016, 09:23:11 PM
Hi debbiec. If you would like to change the name is fine with me. I will let you choose the new name. Thanks, Ron.
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: Ron on January 12, 2017, 12:42:37 PM
Maybe more charges?

                              http://www.680news.com/2017/01/12/police-release-new-information-case-nurse-accused-killing-8-seniors/


                         

            Police to release new information in case of nurse accused of killing 8 seniors

   















by The Canadian Press

Posted Jan 12, 2017 11:18 am EST

Ontario Provincial Police say they will be releasing new information this week in the case of a former nurse accused of killing eight seniors in two long-term care homes.

Sgt. David Rektor says an update on Elizabeth Wettlaufer’s case will come on Friday morning.

Wettlaufer is charged with eight counts of first-degree murder in the deaths of residents at nursing homes in Woodstock, Ont., and London, Ont.

Police allege Wettlaufer used drugs to kill the seniors while she worked at the facilities between 2007 and 2014.

Her alleged victims have been identified as James Silcox, 84, Maurice Granat, 84, Gladys Millard, 87, Helen Matheson, 95, Mary Zurawinski, 96, Helen Young, 90, Maureen Pickering, 79, and Arpad Horvath, 75.

Wettlaufer, 49, is set to appear in person in a Woodstock court on Friday.

Police have said their investigation into the alleged murders was launched in September last year. Wettlaufer was arrested in late October.

Records from the College of Nurses of Ontario show Wettlaufer was first registered as a nurse in August 1995 but resigned Sept. 30, 2016, and is no longer a registered nurse.
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: jellybean on January 27, 2017, 01:59:53 PM
Quote
A directive posted on a government website, from Ontario’s ministry of health and long-term care to the regional agency responsible for home and nursing care, orders admissions to Caressant Care Woodstock Nursing Home suspended as of Thursday until further notice because of concerns for residents and future residents.

“The ceasing of admissions has been directed based on my belief that there is a risk of harm to the health or well-being of residents in the home or persons who might be admitted as residents,” says the directive dated Jan. 25 from Karen Simpson, who heads inspections of long-term care homes in Ontario.

This is good news - A little too late.
And how about this one?
Quote
Two of the four charges of attempted murder the 49-year-old former nurses faces also involved residents at the same home, as well as two charges of aggravated assault against two elderly sisters.

Aggravated assault?   Where were the other staff members when these assaults took place??

I think this home should be placed on the chopping block.  Revoke their license, and the head honcho's of this facility should be charged  with negligence, lack of over-sight and absence of due diligence of protection and care.

JB

JB


Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: jellybean on January 28, 2017, 04:17:24 PM
Fire all of them... keep the bldg, and restaff it.

If possible.  Have a weekly inspector go in, over  a 12 month period.
That should clear it up.
Anything is possible, if the Province wants to put it's back to it.
This would send a clear message to other Senior Care Homes.
Sloppy reporting and looking the other way - might be found in other Senior Homes, I suspect.


JB
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: Sap1 on June 01, 2017, 07:38:33 PM
Long article with much repetition, video, and twitter comments, so following is an excerpt.


http://globalnews.ca/news/3494882/elizabeth-wettlaufer-court/

WOODSTOCK, Ont. – A former Ontario nurse angry with her career and personal life believed she was an instrument of God as she used insulin to kill vulnerable seniors in her care over the course of nearly a decade.

About seven months after her arrest last fall, Elizabeth Wettlaufer pleaded guilty Thursday to eight counts of first-degree murder, four counts of attempted murder and two counts of aggravated assault.


The crimes – which took place in three Ontario long-term care facilities and at a private home – make Wettlaufer one of Canada’s most prolific serial killers.

Emotional family and friends of her victims packed a Woodstock, Ont., courtroom as the 49-year-old quietly said the word “guilty” 14 times and admitted to a judge that she used insulin in every case.

“There was always that red surging that I identified with God talking to me,” Wettlaufer told a detective calmly in a confession video played in court. “Then I’d go get the insulin.”

Prosecutors laid out the details of each incident in an agreed statement of facts that included chilling revelations Wettlaufer made to authorities. Then, about 75 family and friends of the victims watched the video of the former nurse confessing to Woodstock police.


Family, friends of Elizabeth Wettlaufer’s victims cope with losing their loved ones twice

In many cases, a growing rage over her job and her life built up until Wettlaufer felt an “urge to kill,” court heard. She said the feeling would only abate after she overdosed her victims.

“Then I’d get that laughing fit, like a cackle,” she said to police.

Court heard that Wettlaufer was not intoxicated on drugs or alcohol when she killed or tried to kill. Many of her victims lived with dementia.

She told police she knew that “if your blood sugar goes low enough, you can die.” She also told police she refrained from logging her use of insulin in order to avoid detection, court heard.
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: Have faith on June 01, 2017, 08:59:46 PM
The following is truly shocking information. These people should be charged as "accessories after the fact"  to murder! She could have been stopped if they had reported her her to police.

"Over the years, she told at least 11 people what she was up to, including her pastor, who prayed with her and told her if she did it again he would report her, and a lawyer who told her to remain silent."

http://www.lfpress.com/2017/06/01/elizabeth-wettlaufer-the-woodstock-woman-entered-guilty-pleas-monday-to-murder-and-attempted-murder-charges-against-seniors-in-her-care

WOODSTOCK - By the end of the interview with the Woodstock police, killer nurse Elizabeth Wettlaufer admitted people would likely think she’s “a monster.”

That’s putting it mildly.

For a harrowing two-and-a-half hours, Wettlaufer, 49, using a tone of voice you might hear if someone was describing a vacation or a shopping trip, nonchalantly described how she murdered eight elderly, vulnerable people in long-term care homes in London and Woodstock by injecting them with oversdoses of insulin she swiped from supply cupboards.

The former long-term care nurse pleaded guilty Thursday to eight counts of first-degree murder, four of attempted murder and counts of aggravated assault, confessing publicly to the biggest health care mass murder in Canadian history.

Already, the guilty pleas are fueling calls for a full-blown public inquiry into the quality of care in Canada’s long-term care homes, especially in Ontario where the province’s own auditor general has had harsh things to say about backlogged complaints in the province’s more than 630 homes with 78,000 residents. So far, the government is sitting back — waiting for the court case to conclude.

Clearly, the people Wettlaufer murdered or tried to kill were vulnerable.

In the prime of their lives, they were average Canadians — immigrants, Second World veterans, tradesmen, loyal church-goers, restaurant workers and housewives.

But in their later years, many of them had dementia, some of them had diabetes and all needed care.

Wettlaufer spoke in a clear, strong voice as she entered her guilty pleas. She stayed focused on the video screen showing her interview, never straying from it, even when one friend of the dead uttered insults when he stormed out of the courtroom.

The difference between living and dying, for the unfortunate souls in Wettlaufer’s care, depended on her mood. If she was feeling frustrated or angry or overwhelmed at her “really hard job” looking after patients, she might decide it was your time to go.

She might like you, but decide you weren’t really enjoying your life anymore, so why not hurry death along? And if you were “miserable” or “a handful,” she knew what to do.

That “red surge” that would bubble up inside her every time, she thought, came from God, — or maybe, she admitted, from the devil. It told her to load up an insulin needle with long- aor short-acting insulin and and inject her victims with massive dosages.

Killing, she said, “relieved the pressure.”

But their deaths weren’t instant. As was outlined by the Crown in the agreed statement of facts, Wettlaufer worked evening shifts at Carresant Care nursing home in Woodstock and would often be gone from work by the time the medication began the painful process to death.

Her victims would have massive drops in blood sugar, causing hypoclycemia. They might become confused, pale, sweaty, shaky, irritable. Their heart rates might go up. They might become weak.

And they might slip into into a coma. Or, as Wettlaufer so matter-of-factly described it, “stroke out.”

Someone, like Helen Matheson, 93, originally from Innerkip, so sweet that Wettlaufer went out to buy the woman her favourite blueberry pie and ice cream the night she injected her in 2011, “might have said “‘Ow’” when the needle was stuck in her arm, she said in the confession.

Or, Mary Zurawinski, 93, who asked she be put in “the death bed” in palliative care in November 2011. “Well, she must be the next one,” Wettlaufer said she thought, before injecting her.

Some had to be rushed to hospital.

Others tried to fight her off, like the stubborn Gladys Millard, 87, an Alzheimer’s patient in Caressant Care in 2011 who “struggled” until Wettlaufer foound a place on her body where Millard wouldn’t grab her.

Or, Helen Young, 90, who often told the nurses, “Help me die.”

“Helen was miserable,” Wettlaufer told the police officer in the interview.

On July 13, 2013, something “snapped inside’ and Wettlaufer thought, “Okay, you will die.”

She injected so much insulin into Young that she later had a seizure. She died the next morning after Wettlaufer was long gone.

But when her niece came to retrieve YOung’s belongings, Wettlaufer hugged her as she cried. Wettlaufer said she felt “guilt, shame” and as if she had “betrayed her.”

She told the officer she felt badly for all the families. Her first murder victim in 2008, James Silcox, who suffered from dementia, had been a nuisance to her while he recovered from hip surgery. She felt it was “his time to go.”

He called out, “I love you” and “I’m sorry” before his death. “His wife and his daughter loved him a lot,” she told the officer.

In the public gallery, filled with family, daughter Andrea Silcox sobbed.

Mo Granat, 84, was so ravaged by cancer, she had to inject him in his leg. “There were people who loved him,” she said. “He had friends who would come who were like family.”

One of those friends, Laura Jackson, looked on in tears.

Same with the Horvath family when they heard Londoner Arpad Horvath Sr., a resident with dementia at Meadow Park nursing home in London, where Wettlaufer was hired after she was fired from Caressant Care, “fought the first needle. The second needle got in.”

She really didn’t want to kill Maureen Pickering, 73, in 2004, but just put her in a coma to make her “less hard to handle.” She suffered a stroke and died.

Six others survived Wettlaufer’s insulin indignites. Her first two victims were lovely sisters-in-law, Clothilde Adriano and Albina DeMedeiros, who were her first test runs.

“I didn’t really want her to die,” she said about Adriano. “I just don’t know, I was angry and had this sense inside me that she might be a person that God wanted back with him.”

Wayne Hedges was schizophrenic. Mike Priddle had Huntington’s disease. Wettlaufer thought they weren’t enjoying life anymore. They survived.

Through all of it, Wettlaufer was drinking heavily — rye and water was her drink of choice — and was addicted to hydromorphone, a drug she would steal from patients. Her marriage had collapsed, she had a year-long, same-sex relationship and was involved in counselling.

She gave up killing for a couple of years and focused on God and the Bible. But that old familiar red surge returned.

Over the years, she told at least 11 people what she was up to, including her pastor, who prayed with her and told her if she did it again he would report her, and a lawyer who told her to remain silent.

It was only after she was told in her last job that she would be working with diabetic kids, and not seniors, that she gave up nursing. She was too frighted she might harm kids.

She entered treatment at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health in Toronto and confessed.

At the end of the police interview, Woodstock Police Const. Nathan Hergott asked Wettlaufer about her tattoo. It reads “Hope and Dreams” and “that somehow, some way I can help somebody.”

That includes people in jail, or maybe, she said, hopefully, someone can study her so this doesn’t happen again. What she knows for sure now is that it wasn’t God at all— it was her and “my mental illness.

She returns to court June 26 and 27 for victim impact statements and sentencing — a mandatory life sentence, with no chance of parole for 25 years.

The day ended with Superior Court Justice Bruce Thomas commending the families who suffered through a day of sadness. He said he couldn’t imagine their grief and emotions.

And “I can’t imagine the betrayal,” he said.




 

Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: jellybean on June 05, 2017, 02:10:27 PM
This woman is very sick - the pastor is delusioned and should be brought before the courts and made to repeat his advice given to her before the public for all to hear.  and the lawyer to whom she confessed should be brought before the courts.
I believe that confidentiality does not apply when it comes to murder. Be it man of the cloth, or lawyer.

Seems to me her confessions were set aside, with the judgement being - oh well, they were elderly and did not have much to live for. It might have been different were it a child or a healthy person.

She was confessing all over the place, thus wanted to be stopped.  Shame on those who heard her out, and did not take any action.

I view these people as enablers and accessories to murder.

jb
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: RubyRose on June 05, 2017, 02:49:12 PM
I agree, jellybean.  I was shaking my head when I first heard that.  Perhaps they didn't take her seriously.  That's no excuse but it's the only feeble explanation I can come up with.

I also agree that she is very sick and I too think she was confessing to these people hoping to be stopped.

Cold comfort, I know, to the survivors of her victims.
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: Sap1 on June 06, 2017, 03:12:49 PM
I was under the impression that when a perp confesses to a minister/priest, that the clergy person has an obligation to report confessions of murder.

A lot of people to blame here.
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: 2soccermom on June 06, 2017, 05:29:45 PM
yes, I think that's right, SAP.  I don't know about "pastor"-individual relations, but for the Catholic church (with which I'm more familiar) the sacrament of confession is considered sacred and unbreakable, and priests can be de-frocked (!) for sharing information gleaned in the confessional, regardless of the import. This, I believe, includes statements on intention to commit harm or disclosures of harm -- which is fundamentally abhorrent to me. I hope someone will correct me on this :)
But my understanding is that Canadian *law*, on the other hand, places the burden of disclosure on clergy, lawyers, clinicians and any others IF there is risk of imminent harm to others. While these relationships carry recognition of their special nature (as in patient or client confidentiality), that special recognition upends if one has knowledge of potentional risk to others. I believe there have been some fraught and contentious interpretations of the law in past, but this is my inexpert understanding of the current state of law here. Which suggests some lapse in the law that Catholic doctrine (if I have it right; and, regardless, Catholic dogma is not specifically relevant to NWs case) has not yet been consitutionally challenged.
Yes, I agree that both the pastor and lawyer here have committed at least moral crimes and quite probably legal ones.
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: jellybean on June 10, 2017, 02:29:01 PM
I don't see how the lawyer and the clergy could sleep peacefully at night, after speaking with this woman, never knowing for certain that she would take their advice and stop future killings.
Did they brush her off as a professional confessor to crimes that were never committed?
A seeker of attention?

How could they take the risk?  Not to mention her confessions of past killings.
If the man of cloth was a priest, then the priest is placed in a tough position.

They must keep secrecy, regardless - or risk excommunication.
see link.

http://canonlawmadeeasy.com/2008/12/04/can-a-priest-ever-reveal-what-is-said-in-confession/

jb


Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: RubyRose on June 12, 2017, 01:01:19 PM
I'm not particularly religious so probably have no right to comment on something so serious but I think i'd take my chances on excommunication rather than think I might have assisted in part to someone's untimely death.

I suppose the lawyer could always claim Lawyer/Client confidentiality but I'm not sure in law how that might apply to crimes which may be committed in the future as opposed to crimes which have already been committed.

Whatever the reasons, both did make serious errors in judgement and should probably not be practicing in their present professions in any case.
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: Sap1 on June 26, 2017, 03:07:43 PM
8 concurrent sentences. No eligibility for parole for 25 years and the judge said likely never. All she could do was mumble a feeble "sorry" but knew it wasn't enough. These family members went through grieving twice. Some came down with mental health issues and lost their jobs. So very many people so harshly affected. So very tragic!

  http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/london/killer-nurse-wettlaufer-sentencing-1.4175164

UPDATED
Ex-nurse who killed 8 seniors in her care sentenced to 8 concurrent life terms
Elizabeth Wettlaufer spoke in court after hearing stories of suffering from victims' families
By Colin Butler, Kate Dubinski, CBC News Posted: Jun 23, 2017 4:42 PM ET Last Updated: Jun 26, 2017 4:42 PM ET

Elizabeth Wettlaufer is escorted by police from the courthouse in Woodstock, Ont, Monday. Wettlaufer, a former Ontario nurse who murdered eight seniors in her care, was sentenced Monday to life in prison with no eligibility for parole for 25 years.
Elizabeth Wettlaufer is escorted by police from the courthouse in Woodstock, Ont, Monday. Wettlaufer, a former Ontario nurse who murdered eight seniors in her care, was sentenced Monday to life in prison with no eligibility for parole for 25 years. (Dave Chidley/Canadian Press)


Province calls public inquiry into long-term care homes
Will we recall Elizabeth Wettlaufer's name the way we do Karla Homolka's?: Opinion
Here's what Elizabeth Wettlaufer confessed to police about killing 8 seniors in her care
'Blind spot in the system': Why health-care workers who kill can be difficult to detect
Who are the victims in the alleged nursing-home killings?
Former nurse Elizabeth Wettlaufer told a court in Woodstock, Ont., on Monday that she was "extremely sorry" for killing eight nursing home patients before being sentenced to eight concurrent life terms in prison with no chance of parole for 25 years.

Elizabeth Wettlaufer's murder victims:

James Silcox, 84
Gladys Millard, 87
Helen Matheson, 95
Mary Zurawinski, 96
Helen Young, 90
Maureen Pickering, 79
Aprad Horvath, 75
Maurice Granat, 84
Superior Court Justice Bruce Thomas called Wettlaufer a predator who was a "shadow of death" that passed over the elderly victims she was supposed to care for and protect.

"She was far from an angel of mercy," he said. "Instead, she was a shadow of death that passed over [her victims]."

Wettlaufer, 50, will also have to provide a DNA sample for the national criminal database.

It was the culmination of an emotional day, which started with the loved ones and friends of the eight victims reading victim impact statements.
Then, it was Wettlaufer's turn to speak.

"I caused tremendous pain and suffering and death.... Sorry is much too small a word. I am extremely sorry."

Thomas could have sentenced Wettlaufer to eight consecutive life terms, meaning 200 years, but chose not to take that option.

He told her she will likely never be paroled.

​Earlier this month, Wettlaufer pleaded guilty to eight counts of first-degree murder, four counts of attempted murder and two counts of aggravated assault. She will also serve 10 years for each attempted murder, and seven years for each aggravated assault.

Shannon Emmerton
Shannon Emmerton told the court she still can't believe her grandmother Gladys Millard was the victim of a serial murderer. (Colin Butler )

She confessed in dramatic videos shown to the court during her trial that she used insulin to kill and injure the nursing home residents between 2007 and 2014.

Read Tweets from court

In total, 28 victim impact statements were received by the court, but only 19 from friends and relatives were read aloud Monday.

"It's like she died twice," said the niece of Gladys Millard about mourning her aunt when the 87-year-old died in 2011, and then again in 2016 when she found out she had been murdered.

'We had no chance to say goodbye'

Thomas told the family members to take their time when reading their victim impact statements.

"This is an important experience for you," Thomas said.

Many of the family members spoke about blaming themselves for not noticing their loved ones were in peril at the hands of Wettlaufer.

PlayPoster of video clip‘I feel now that my nightmare is over’



 JUMP TO BEGINNING OF THE TRACK  WATCH  ADJUST VOLUME
00:00 01:53  SHARE  FULLSCREEN
‘I feel now that my nightmare is over’1:53

"I placed my mother in the care of a facility I researched, never thinking she would be the victim of a despicable crime," the daughter of Helen Matheson, 95, said in her victim impact statement.

Others said they worried about family members in long-term-care homes.

"We worry now and are fearful now that our family members are aging," said a tearful friend of Mary Zurawinski, a 96-year-old who was killed in Woodstock in 2011.

"We had no chance to say goodbye."

Her grandmother was looking forward to her 100th birthday, Zurawinski's granddaughter Debora Rivers told court.

Her grandmother's murder "fills us with hatred and rage," Rivers said.

After the sentencing, she said her family will try to forgive Wettlaufer because they are Christians, but they will find it very difficult. 

"She's getting what she deserves. I was hoping for at least one consecutive [sentence] so there'd be no chance that she'd get out, but I don't think she'll ever get out," Rivers told reporters.

'The whole thing makes me sick and angry'

"I don't really want to hear from her. She did what she did. How do you apologize for that? The whole thing just makes me sick and angry," Laura Jackson, whose friend Maurice (Moe) Granat, 84, was among Wettlaufer's victims, said before Monday's hearing.

"I don't ever want [Wettlaufer] to breathe free air again. I want her to live in a box and contemplate what she's done and know that because of her actions she's put herself into a box," Jackson said.

WATCH: Elizabeth Wettlaufer confession
Ex-nurse Elizabeth Wettlaufer felt 'red surge' before killing elderly patients
Assistant Crown Attorney Fraser Kelly told reporters after the court proceedings that he hoped the guilty pleas give "some measure of closure and comfort" to the families of the victims.

The investigation into Wettlaufer's crimes was very complex and involved five police jurisdictions: Woodstock, London, Brantford, Ingersoll and Paris, Kelly said.

Prosecutors decided to play Wettlaufer's confession in court because "the content of her confession wasn't just peculiar, it was also very detailed. [The public] would never be able to appreciate the nuances of it if we didn't play it," he said.

Sentence is predetermined

Wettlaufer's sentence is predetermined in Canadian law. The question was how she would serve her life terms.

The Crown and defence agreed to ask for the sentences to be served concurrently, but the judge had the final say.

Stephen Harper's Conservative government changed the legal rules, allowing judges the discretion to impose first-degree murder sentences consecutively.

"There's a strange irony because there are some people who say, 'They'll only get out when they're very old and have to be put in nursing care,' but that's the last place where Ms. Wettlaufer should go because that's where she committed her crimes," Ingrid Grant, a criminal lawyer who has been following the case, told CBC News.

She thinks it's unlikely Wettlaufer will ever be granted parole.

"It certainly is an odd case. We don't see very many cases of women committing murder, certainly not in cases like this," Grant said. "She describes feeling a red surge before she killed, she got some kind of thrill out of it. It's a really rare circumstance to have for anyone, but particularly a woman."
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: capeheart on June 26, 2017, 05:52:31 PM
I think she should have gotten 25 years for each life she took, consecutive years, just in case someone else thinks they are playing God. She had a family, a son and all those people were cared for by an evil person who took control of their lives and ended them. She premeditated these murders and it is as cruel as anyone could think of.  I couldn't forgive her if she had done that to someone belonged to me. My mom was in a home for the elderly, she wasn't in bed all the time, she was quite able to tell what was going on around her. She would have had the mind to tell us if anything unusual was going on. She was 92 when she passed away. This woman thankfully was caught, but way too late, too many died at her hands.  :o :o :o :o :o :o
Title: Re: Elizabeth Wettlaufer charged in nursing home deaths - Southwest Ontario
Post by: Sap1 on June 27, 2017, 01:27:52 PM
I thought so too Cape, ... 25 each heinous murder. She stated in police interviews that killing a senior relived her stresses and with so many other factors known now, I really doubt she will even get parole in 25 years if she applies.
She is so very very "off" mentally that I have the gut feeling she can not cope with her demons in a small cell and may eventually take her own life. Just imo.

My thoughts and prayers are for the families of the victims. :(

Here is another insight about her from a prospective love interest. She showed some strong anti social behavior for a long period but I suppose it doesn't always point to murder although she had already murdered two seniors by this time.

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2017/06/01/i-think-i-dated-a-serial-killer-saskatchewan-woman-dated-serial-senior-killer_n_16916110.html

PRINCE ALBERT, Sask. — A Saskatchewan woman who briefly dated Elizabeth Wettlaufer said she figured the woman was a bit off, but "I didn't know she was that far off."
Sheila Andrews said she met the former Ontario nurse — who pleaded guilty Thursday to killing eight seniors in her care — through an online dating site in 2009.
Andrews, 50, said they quickly found common ground because Wettlaufer, 49, worked closely with seniors and often discussed work, and at the time Andrews was caring for her elderly mother.
"She was an awesome person to talk to online," Andrews said. "She wanted to move forward and start a relationship, so I said, 'Well, let's meet.'"
elizabeth wettlaufer


Wettlaufer had already committed at least two murders when she flew to Saskatoon to meet Andrews in June 2009. Her crimes were committed over the course of a decade at four locations.
Andrews said after a night at a motel in Saskatoon, they drove to her home in Prince Albert, Sask.
During the week they went out for meals, toured the city and hung around the house but Wettlaufer was not very social, was concerned about her appearance and didn't meet any of her friends.
Earlier on HuffPost: Former Ontario Nurse Says God Told Her To Kill Seniors In Her Care

Andrews said Wettlaufer seemed to pout and sulk if she did not get her way, and joked one time about not wanting to grow up.
When they went to visit Andrews' mother in a care facility, Wettlaufer sulked quietly in the corner. After the visit, Wettlaufer told Andrews she would not go back to the hospital again, which Andrews thought was strange behaviour from a registered nurse.
Her trial was told the killings were the result of Wettlaufer's anger with her career and personal life, and her belief she was an instrument of God.
'Very frightening'

Andrews said it was "very frightening" when she saw Wettlaufer's face on the news after she was charged in 2016.
"I actually texted my best friend and I said, 'I think I dated a serial killer!'"
Andrews said she has gone over her short time with Wettlaufer many times trying to pinpoint any hints or clues she may have missed.
"I just thank God that she didn't try to do anything to me in my sleep … I wasn't old enough, I guess."
(CKBI)