Unsolved Murders | Missing People Canada

General Category => General Discussion => Topic started by: Sap1 on August 15, 2016, 10:11:00 PM

Title: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on August 15, 2016, 10:11:00 PM

Edited to add: In the beginning of this case stories were fabricated and even now, stories are still being made, as one lawyer pointed out and the witness who had fabricated, agreed. If one wants justice and not revenge, it is in the best interests to speak the truth to media and police, especially the police. What the heck can truth and reconciliation provide when so much is based on fabrication?
I have changed my mind ... this wasn't so much a case of vigilante justice as it was self protection after continued targeting of farmers. Farmers who were hard working and ran their butts off providing their families with livelihood. NO ONE has a RIGHT to steal from them. CRA takes enough.

http://news.nationalpost.com/news/canada/racial-tension-in-sask-after-first-nations-man-shot-dead-while-looking-for-flat-tire-help-on-farm-family-says

BIGGAR, Sask. — Racial tensions are flaring in Saskatchewan after the fatal shooting of a First Nations man who relatives say was just looking for help with a flat tire.

Colten Boushie, 22, was killed Tuesday after the vehicle he was in drove onto a farm in the rural municipality of Glenside, west of Saskatoon.

Boushie’s cousin, Eric Meechance, said he and three other friends were also in the car, heading home to the Red Pheasant First Nation after an afternoon spent swimming at a river.

THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO
THE CANADIAN PRESS/HOColten Boushie is shown in this undated handout photo. Racial tensions are flaring in Saskatchewan after the fatal shooting of a First Nations man who relatives say was just looking for help with a flat tire. Colten Boushie, 22, was killed Tuesday after the vehicle he was in drove onto a farm in the rural municipality of Glenside, west of Saskatoon.
But Meechance said they had a tire blow out and that’s how they ended up at the farm.

“That guy just come out of nowhere and he just smashed our window,” said Meechance.

Meechance said they tried to drive away, but ended up colliding with a parked car. He then ran for safety as gunshots rang out.

“Running is probably what saved all of our lives, you know, because if he’s going to shoot one, he’s probably would have shot us all,” he said.

“He wasn’t shooting to scare us. He was shooting to kill.”

Gerald Stanley, 54, is charged with second-degree murder. He is to make his next court appearance in North Battleford on Aug. 18.

Meechance said Boushie was a hard worker, mowing lawns and cutting wood to earn money.

A GoFundMe page has been set up to raise $10,000 to help Boushie’s family cover funeral expenses.

Another GoFundMe page has been set up to help Stanley’s wife. The hope is to raise $35,000.
Title: Re: Vigilante Justice ... for no reason!
Post by: Sap1 on August 15, 2016, 10:16:26 PM
I wouldn't go to any steak dinner for a murderer either! This is bizarre!

http://news.nationalpost.com/news/canada/relatives-of-aboriginal-victim-want-fundraiser-for-saskatchewan-farmer-charged-with-his-murder-cancelled

The family of shooting victim Colten Boushie is urging supporters of his accused killer to join them in their healing journey.

They hope organizers will cancel a planned steak night fundraiser for Gerald Stanley, who stands charged with second-degree murder after Boushie was shot nearly one week ago in a farm yard 90 kilometres west of Saskatoon.

They hope all residents of the Battlefords and Biggar districts — aboriginal or not — will instead attend a rally for Boushie Thursday at North Battleford provincial court. As of Sunday afternoon, more than 300 people had indicated on Facebook they’d attend.

“They’re all welcome to come support Colten,” said Boushie’s uncle, Alvin Baptiste.


“We all have to live together. We can’t live with hatred, passing it down through the generations.”

THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO
THE CANADIAN PRESS/HOColten Boushie is shown in this undated handout photo. Racial tensions are flaring in Saskatchewan after the fatal shooting of a First Nations man who relatives say was just looking for help with a flat tire. Colten Boushie, 22, was killed Tuesday after the vehicle he was in drove onto a farm in the rural municipality of Glenside, west of Saskatoon.
Several area landowners who declined to give their name say they’ll be attending the steak night, and decried the high property crime rates in the area.

Perdue Mayor Dave Miller said he hasn’t heard any complaints about the steak night and isn’t sure whether he’ll attend. Miller said he won’t be passing judgment on the situation until the verdict is read.

“I wasn’t there. I don’t know what happened,” Miller said. “I don’t really have an opinion.”

Baptiste was disappointed with Miller’s response.

“Have some pity. What if your kid got shot?” Baptiste said. “I guess they just don’t understand.”

Baptiste understands the frustration some farmers must feel when they experience theft or have other negative experiences. He understands that it might cause them to be suspicious. That doesn’t justify supporting someone accused of murder.

“Right now it’s tense, but to support taking the law into your own hands is wrong. If there’s a problem, call the authorities,” he said.

Baptiste said they are grateful for all of the support across Canada from people of all cultures.

“We feel it and know we are not alone,” he said.

Boushie’s funeral Saturday included both Christian and traditional First Nations rituals, speeches from elders and First Nations leaders. On the way to the cemetery, Baptiste said three eagles flew over the procession.

“We believe that’s a sign the Creator sent the eagles to retrieve Colten’s spirit,” he said.

Boushie died last Tuesday afternoon after he and four friends pulled into a farm yard in the Sonningdale district. Stanley was charged with second-degree murder. As of last report, no other charges have been laid against anyone involved in the incident.

Related
‘Racial tension’ in Sask. after First Nations man shot dead while looking for flat tire help on farm, family says
‘Our peoples are not equal’: First Nations say RCMP ‘blamed the victim’ of fatal on-farm shooting
Saskatchewan Association of Rural Municipalities resident Ray Orb called the Boushie case “a really sad story.” He said it’s vital for rural districts to cultivate relationships with First Nations so they can better weather controversies such as this.

“There’s a lot of work to be done on that front. You need to lay the ground work,” he said.

“Some municipalities are better at it than others, and it goes both ways.”
As for landowners’ frustrations over property crime, Orb said there is no ambiguity.

“You can protect yourself, but we have to follow the laws of the land,” he said.

“We all live in the same province — we have to look after each other. As time goes by, that will only become more important.”
Title: Re: Vigilante Justice ... for no reason!
Post by: Sap1 on August 15, 2016, 10:24:04 PM
Conditions between First nations and police in Saskatchewan have been strained at the best of times.

http://thestarphoenix.com/news/local-news/sask-premier-brad-wall-says-racist-and-hate-filled-comments-after-fatal-farmyard-shooting-must-stop

REGINA — Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall is condemning what he calls “racist and hate-filled” comments on social media and other online forums that stem from last week’s fatal shooting of an aboriginal man on a farm.

Wall says in a Facebook post on Sunday afternoon that the comments betray the values and character of Saskatchewan.


Colten Boushie, 22, was shot last Tuesday after a car he was in went onto the rural property near Biggar.

A cousin of Boushie’s says they were headed home to the Red Pheasant First Nation near North Battleford when they got a flat tire and needed help, but says a man on the farm smashed their window and fired shots as they tried to drive away.

Wall says that he has every confidence in the RCMP to investigate the circumstances of Boushie’s death.

“None of us should be jumping to any conclusions about what happened. We should trust the RCMP to do their work,” Wall says in the post.

“I call on Saskatchewan people to rise above intolerance, to be our best and to be the kind of neighbours and fellow citizens we are reputed to be.”


Comments continued over the weekend on numerous online sites. Some were anti First Nation, while others supported vigilante justice against the suspect in the case.


First Nations leaders said last week that a police news release about the shooting was biased, and they called for an RCMP review of communication policies and writing guidelines.

An initial news release said people in the car had been taken into custody as part of a theft investigation.

Superintendent Rob Cameron in Regina responded that officers handled the investigation fairly and competently.

Wall said the hateful comments that have appeared online must stop.

“There are laws that protect citizens from what this kind of hate may foment. They will be enforced,” he said.

The suspect, Gerald Stanley, 54, has been charged with second-degree murder in connection with the case.

Stanley is to make his next court appearance in North Battleford on Aug. 18 to face the allegations.
Title: Re: Vigilante Justice ... for no reason!
Post by: RubyRose on August 16, 2016, 01:32:21 PM
Thank you, Sap1.

I had not heard of this previously.  I'm surprised it hasn't generated more media interest here (Atlantic) but if it has, I guess I missed it.  Perhaps it was the fact that an arrest was made quickly, because the murder of the young First Nations couple in Alberta received much coverage here.

I can understand the frustration involved when individuals experience theft, vandalism, etc and the authorities do not seem to be able to do anything to stop it  but, at least in what has been reported so far, there is no evidence or indication of that being the case here.   In any event, that is no excuse for what happened.

I wasn't overly impressed with the mayor's statements.  To simply say he wasn't there and didn't know what happened so he didn't have an opinion is just a cop-out.  No one should, and I am not suggesting he did, condone this kind of "justice" so-called, whatever the motivation.
Title: Re: Vigilante Justice ... for no reason!
Post by: Sap1 on August 16, 2016, 04:08:12 PM
You're welcome RubyRose. I'm surprised this hasn't made its way across Canada because everyone knows there is a long standing battle/animosity/ or whatever one wants to call it ... in Saskatchewan between members of the general public and FN peoples. There are good and bad in every race and color of people, and just because there are some FN men who may use thefts to gain money (there certainly are a lot of people of various ethnicity that do steal), they aren't all in that basket. Colten was proud of his accomplishments, earning several trade tickets to work.

The shooter's wife had supposedly said to the kids who were still in the car ... "this is what happens when you trespass". It will be interesting to find out and I'm sure it will be broadcast if the Mayor does join the steak dinner. His speech was very lame and like you said total cop-out.

Can you imagine the extreme fright these young people had when their window was smashed and the bullets started to fly?! Then they were arrested by RCMP for possible theft. Relations between RCMP and FN have been very bad in Sask and apparently still are.
Police are known to hang around driveways of FN people down there ... I think they should hang around farmer's driveways and catch the real thieves.
Title: Re: Vigilante Justice ... for no reason! Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on August 23, 2016, 07:43:09 AM
http://www.cbc.ca/news/aboriginal/indigenous-youth-speak-out-about-racism-hope-for-change-1.3725451

For many young Indigenous people in Saskatchewan, the shooting death of Colten Boushie has highlighted racial tensions they are all too familiar with. They are frustrated and worried that the place they call home is an unsafe place to live and raise children — and determined to turn things around before it gets worse.

Andre Bear, a student from Little Pine First Nation Saskatchewan, recalls experiencing racism at an early age.

"I remember having white friends when I was growing up, but their parents didn't like me or they would tell me to go home. People weren't allowed to play with me because I was native," said Bear.

The racist comments on social media in the past week have not been surprising to Bear, who is the youth representative for the Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations and co-chair of the Assembly of First Nations Youth Council.

Racial tensions flare in Sask. following killing of 22-year-old First Nations man
Sask. politicians call for end to racism following Colten Boushie's death
"People can say things are a lot different [after the shooting], but a lot of it is just the same. It's just that more people are paying attention to the racist attitudes that have always been there."

Erica Violet Lee is a student and community organizer who grew up in the inner-city of Saskatoon. She says that she hasn't paid much attention to the comments being made on social media.

'For a lot of the young men that I know, the fear is different ... They're afraid of being seen as a criminal no matter what they do.'
- Erica Violet Lee, student and community organizer
"I know from having lived in the province for so long. I know exactly what settlers think of Indigenous people. I don't need that in my face all the time. I don't need to be reminded 'cause I know."

Lee was always taught to protect herself. She describes the fears of what it's like being an Indigenous woman living in an urban city.

"I don't want to go missing. I don't want to get killed by some guy. I don't want to experience sexual assault, while i'm just trying to walk down the street," said Lee.

She also sees a lot of the concerns that young Indigenous men have to face.

"For a lot of the young men that I know, the fear is different. They're afraid of being looked at as predators. They're afraid of being seen as a criminal no matter what they do."

"As Indigenous people of Saskatchewan, we're immediately looked at as criminals, as people who are trespassers," said Lee.

Janelle Pewapsconias spent the first half of her life in her home community of Little Pine First Nation, Sask. She moved to Saskatoon to attend university and described being pulled over by police for no reason.

Janelle Pewapsconias
Janelle Pewapsconias, a student and entrepreneur is doing her best to raise her son but worries for his future. (Errol Sutherland)

"Being brown on the wrong side of the city will get you carded," said Pewapsconias.

Pewapsconias, a student and entrepreneur is doing her best to raise her son but worries for his future.

"He's growing up in a province and territory that could potentially kill him, for having a bad tire. It's a safety concern for my brothers, my cousins and all of the men in my life," she said.

Moving forward in a place you call home

Despite the experiences they have had with racism in Saskatchewan, it is a place that they call home, that they love and are connected to.

Mylan Tootoosis is a Ph.D candidate who grew up in Poundmaker Cree Nation. Tootoosis is optimistic that things will turn around in the province, but says the work needs to happen on both sides.

Mylan Tootoosis
Mylan Tootoosis believes that conversations about reconciliation need to happen in rural Saskatchewan as well. (Submitted)

"We live in a time where truth and reconciliation is such a big discussion. Indigenous peoples, as educators, as social workers, as community leaders, we're really hitting home with truth and reconciliation. That also needs to happen on the settler side of things. Those discussions also need to happen in rural Saskatchewan," said Tootoosis.

He suggests that the treaties that were signed between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people could be used as a vehicle to bridge the relationship divide in the province.

"The intention of Treaty 6, was to co-exist peacefully on the landscape. So it's going back to … that sense of kinship. That sense of relationship building in very coherent, fundamental humane ways," said Tootoosis.

Pewapsconias is also optimistic that things will get better. She would like to see an overhaul in the education institutions from pre-Kindergarten to university. She recognizes that teaching people about Indigenous culture is a way that people can gain a better understanding of each other.

"I have hope. I always try to work towards creating a better future for my child … where he's not getting a blown out tire or having terrible things happen to him. I have hope, because I need my people to keep moving ahead."

Saskatchewan is "such a beautiful place." said Lee.

"When I travel around the world and I tell people I'm from Saskatchewan, they say ... 'Oh, it's just flat.'  And I think there's so much beauty here. There's also so much that we have to fix in order for people to be safe and free."

   
   
   
   
   
   
Title: Re: Vigilante Justice ... for no reason! Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on August 23, 2016, 07:45:16 AM
http://www.cbc.ca/news/aboriginal/colten-boushie-killed-and-everything-changed-1.3723599


Up until a week ago I was having a pretty good summer.

The inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women was off to a good start, people were talking about reconciliation and the Olympics were sending out good vibes with events like the shared gold medal between Penny Oleksiak and Simone Manuel. Ms Manuel is the first African American to win a medal in swimming.

Then Colten Boushie was killed and everything changed.

Family devastated after Colten Boushie shot and killed on farm near Biggar, Sask
Sask. chiefs accuse RCMP of fuelling racial tensions in wake of deadly shooting
Sask. politicians call for end to racism following Colten Boushie's death
A week ago Tuesday, Boushie's family said he spent the day with friends swimming in the Saskatchewan River east of the Red Pheasant reserve. According to the family, on the way home, they had a flat tire and turned into a farm to get help.

What followed has been told by both sides and in the end, Boushie was dead and Gerald Stanley, the 54-year-old farmer is facing charges of second-degree murder.

Bill Hanson was the head of an organization called the Interprovincial Association for Native Employment. He used to say that 40 per cent of the people support us, 40 per cent can be convinced and 20 per cent won't come around no matter what you do. His advice was to ignore the 20 per cent and work with the rest.

Last week the 20 per cent let their feelings be known and it wasn't good.

This is when social media came alive and people were jumping to conclusions like grasshoppers. The RCMP sent out a press release that didn't clear things up and it in fact added fuel to the bonfire of racism raging on social media.

The RCMP release stated that the three survivors were taken into custody on a theft-related investigation. Later they were all released and no charges were laid. This gave people the opportunity to jump to the conclusion that the Aboriginal youth were thieves.

Also the RCMP made the statement that charges were being contemplated for property damage. This ambiguity led to the belief that the youths had somehow done damage to the farm, in reality the truck's windshield was smashed by one of the people at the farm.

Facebook group fuels hate

A Facebook page with the title Saskatchewan Farmers Group lit up with racist comments. Comments such as "shoot them, breed like rabbits anyways," "He should have shot all five of them given a medal," "his only mistake was leaving three witnesses." And so on.

The page has since disappeared but for a while it was the focus of the province's racist underbelly. But these were not anonymous bigots; they gave their names and were blatant in their condemnation of Aboriginal people. This lack of shame or hiding one's name is an indication that racism is widespread in this province.

The reaction in the Aboriginal community was much different. People were shocked at the callous and racist outpouring of hate before the family even had a chance to mourn their loss, hold the funeral and conduct the appropriate ceremonies.

Colten Boushie remembered as 'good guy' at funeral on a Sask. First Nation
Facebook comments rolled in such as: "This is terrible! Sounds like down south! Murder in front of four witnesses is the crime here!"

'In the past Saskatchewan has had its share of racial violence but this time social media has brought it to the surface.'
- Doug Cuthand
The province's political leaders took a stand against the racist comments but didn't single out the white farm group. Instead condemnation was vaguely spread across the whole population.

Premier Brad Wall naively pointed out that racism has no place in Saskatchewan when in fact, it's a part of this provinces fabric for generations.

However, to his credit, Premier Wall also pointed out that, "There are laws that protect citizens from what this kind of hate may foment. They will be enforced."

In the past, Saskatchewan has had its share of racial violence but this time social media has brought it to the surface.

Today Aboriginal people have laptops and iPads and access to social media. What many white people don't realize is that we have embraced technology and use it as a part of our culture. Stories and commentary are shared on Facebook in the same manner that travellers would tell stories of their exploits.

This was behind the success of the Idle No More movement and it will be behind the ongoing discussion on this case and subsequent demonstrations.

Colten Boushie funeral 2
Family from as far as Alberta and the northwest U.S. gathered on the Red Pheasant First Nation Saturday morning for the funeral of Colten Boushie. (OLIVIER FERAPIE/RADIO-CANADA)

This Thursday, Stanley makes a court appearance and a large rally is planned. Aboriginal people from across the province will be there to show their support to the family and friends who lost a loved one.

This case will no doubt drag on and every court appearance will be met with a demonstration. Saskatchewan race relations will be in the spotlight and the 20 per cent will most likely grow.

But in the end one person has lost his life, a family is in mourning and another has the potential to spend the rest of his life in jail and his family will suffer also. All for an incident that didn't need to happen.

   
   
   
   
   
   
Title: Re: Vigilante Justice ... for no reason! Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on August 23, 2016, 07:51:33 AM
Excerpt:

Quote
But in the end one person has lost his life, a family is in mourning and another has the potential to spend the rest of his life in jail and his family will suffer also. All for an incident that didn't need to happen.

That leaves to be seen. I doubt the killer will spend much time in jail. If there are children involved, this is a tragedy for them as well. As far as the shooter's wife, she made a comment that put her in step with her husband, the shooter. IMHO
Title: Re: Vigilante Justice ... for no reason! Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on February 05, 2018, 12:31:18 PM
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatoon/jurors-indigenous-representation-1.4517610

The trial of Gerald Stanley, who is charged with second-degree murder in the death of Saskatchewan First Nations man Colten Boushie, is exposing a fundamental flaw in Canada's justice system, say some legal experts.

Jury selection took place last week at a community centre gymnasium in the town of Battleford, located approximately 140 kilometres northwest of Saskatoon.

Potential jurors were called to stand before the lawyers and judge, and any of them could be "challenged" by the lawyers and excluded from the jury.

Under the current system, lawyers are not required to give reasons for these so-called peremptory challenges.

Boushie
Colten Boushie was killed on a farm near Biggar, Sask., in August. (Facebook)

The Boushie family say they were angered that all the Indigenous-looking jury candidates were challenged and excluded by  Stanely's defence team.

"The deck is stacked against us ... Where is the First Nations' say in this? We don't have a voice," said Boushie's uncle, Alvin Baptiste.

'It invites bias on the basis of race'
A jury selection process that allows peremptory challenges is vulnerable to allegations of racism against Indigenous people, say some who study the justice system.

penney
Being able to reject jurors without giving reason 'invites bias on the basis of race,' says Steven Penney, co-author of Criminal Procedure in Canada. (submitted)

"It invites bias on the basis of race, but also gender and other factors," said Steven Penney, a University of Alberta law professor and co-author of Criminal Procedure in Canada. "It's not a value we should allow in our system. This case is highlighting those flaws. It may help to spur change."


Gerald Stanley murder trial judge advises jury on contradictory testimony
'Deck is stacked against us,' says family of Colten Boushie after jury chosen for Gerald Stanley trial
Federal Minister of Justice Minister Jody Wilson-Raybould said she shares the concerns about the lack of Indigenous people on juries.

In an emailed statement last Friday, she said peremptory challenges have always been part of the common law and the Canadian justice system. She said any changes would require careful study and consideration.

Gerald Stanley arrives in court JAnuary 31, 2018
Gerald Stanley arrives in court with his defence team. (Guy Quenneville/CBC)

"Nonetheless, the underrepresentation of Indigenous jurors is an issue in several provinces and it is a reality I find concerning," Wilson-Raybould said.

She said the National Judicial Institute is looking at ways to increase the complement of Indigenous jurors, and she supports its work.

Boushie's cousin, Jade Tootoosis, said she was not surprised by the exclusion of Indigenous-looking jury candidates but found it "extremely frustrating."

Eleanore
Eleanore Sunchild is advising the Boushie family. (Jason Warick)

Eleanore Sunchild, a local lawyer advising the Boushie family, noted multiple commissions and inquiries have emphasized the need to be more inclusive of Indigenous people in the justice system. Several have recommended scrapping peremptory challenges.

"It shouldn't be allowed. It seems archaic," Sunchild said.

Anger justified, says law professor
University of Toronto professor Kent Roach is following the case in his criminal law class. He said the Boushie family is correct to be angry.

Roach, the longtime editor of Criminal Law Quarterly, also wants peremptory challenges abolished. He said the federal government could eliminate it in a package of Criminal Code of Canada changes being contemplated.

"I think it's a very simple amendment. It could be done very quickly," he said.


'Huge' pool of 750 people summoned as potential jurors for Colten Boushie case
Sunchild, Roach and others said the Stanley trial jurors are likely competent, fair people, but First Nations and M?tis people have different life experiences and see the world through a different lens than non-Indigenous people.

Other ways to challenge jurors
Penney and Roach said lawyers could still challenge jurors in other ways.

A "for cause" challenge allows jurors to be asked about their biases, likely through a series of agreed-to questions. If jurors are revealed as unsuitable, they are rejected.

Sunchild said it's too late to help the Boushie family, but she hopes changes will help others.

"I hope this case illustrates to Canadians some issues Aboriginal people face."

The trial continues Monday with defence arguments. The Crown wrapped up its case last week.
Title: Re: Vigilante Justice ... for no reason! Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on February 05, 2018, 12:39:33 PM
Drinking, driving, breaking into neighbors trucks ... what would you think and do if the group then entered your yard?


https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/shooting-death-of-colten-boushie-a-freak-accident-defence-argues/article37853099/

An Indigenous man who died in a shooting on a Saskatchewan farm was the victim of "a freak accident that occurred in the course of an unimaginably scary situation," court was told Monday.

Gerald Stanley's lawyer was making his opening arguments before a jury at the man's second-degree murder trial. Scott Spencer told jurors that 22-year-old Colten Boushie's death wasn't justified, but they must put themselves in Stanley's shoes.

He said the Stanley family faced intruders on their farm near Biggar, Sask., in August 2016, which created a panic situation.

"So is it unreasonable to fire warning shots when the intruders have tried to steal, taken a run at you with their vehicle, crashed into your vehicle ? from Gerry's perspective intentionally ? almost run over your wife?" Spencer told court in Battleford, Sask..

"Is it reasonable to fire warning shots to get them to just leave? That's what it comes down to in many ways."

Boushie was sitting in the driver's seat of a grey Ford Escape when he was shot in the back of the head.

"This was not a justified death. This death is not justified legally or morally. It is never, never right to take somebody's life with a gun. But that's not what this case is about," Spencer said.

"This is really not a murder case at all. This is a case about what can go terribly wrong when you create a situation which is really of the nature of a home invasion. For farm people, your yard is your castle and that's part of the story here."

Court has heard an SUV carrying five people had a flat tire and drove onto the Stanley farm. The driver testified the group had been drinking during the day and tried to break into a truck on a neighbouring farm, but went to the Stanley property in search of help with the tire.

Stanley's son has testified that on the day of the shooting, he and his father heard an ATV start and thought it was being stolen. The pair ran toward the SUV and threw a hammer at the windshield as the driver tried to leave the farm.

Sheldon Stanley said he went into the house to get his truck keys and heard two gunshots. He said he heard a third when he came back out. He told court he saw his father, looking sick, with a gun in his hand saying, "It just went off."

"You have to view it from Gerry's perspective and what he faced. The fear, the unknown. When you're in a situation where you have intruders and you don't have the luxury of being able to wait for police assistance. This case comes down to what's reasonable," Spencer said.

"It's not a self defence. What can you do to protect yourself in those circumstances? You can't use lethal force but is it reasonable to deal with the circumstance to protect you and your family?"

Spencer suggested Stanley's gun misfired.

"The tragedy is the gun just went off," he said, adding Stanley will take the stand to explain what happened from his perspective. "The young people aren't on trial but they created this panic situation.

"If they would have just stopped ? stopped drinking, stopped drinking and driving, stopped breaking into people's places, stop vandalizing stuff, stop crashing into things. Just walk away."

The Crown wrapped up its case last week.
Title: Re: Vigilante Justice ... for no reason! Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on February 05, 2018, 01:48:44 PM
This is such a bothersome case. I'm certain both the victim and the shooter were likely very good people and that circumstances led to this horror. I can understand the fears a farmer faces when they are distant from a policing unit and are facing frequent threats of either thefts or damage or injury to a loved one. I also know that imbibing in a lot of alcohol will render a person incapable of making sound judgements. So when a person is associated with a group of young people that frequently drink alcohol and frequently loot from areas not close to a policing unit, what in their alcohol fueled minds make them think anyone of the farmers targeted will trust them? These are not one time incidents, rather frequent occurrences. There are more victims here than just the deceased. Don't push buttons that can turn out to be volatile and for heaven's sake, find a better hobby than getting tanked (drunk) all the time!
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: capeheart on February 05, 2018, 05:21:43 PM
Sap1, I am like you, I never heard about this case too much down in Atlantic area. I feel that the situation was created by others invading a person's private property. I do not believe it had anything to do with race, creed or color.  This is not the first time this has happened, when people have a fear of being robbed and are a long distance from getting help from anyone.  Sometimes the fear causes them to act differently then if it was a one on one situation. The farmer possibly felt threatened and if there was more then one individual, he could have been the person that ended up deceased and not the other way around.  I think in this case, if I was in that situation, I might shoot and ask questions later. I may not aim at the person, but I'd sure as hell have my hand on the phone and the gun at the same time.  And he may have had the impression those people were armed and he may have fired in excitement, may have been going to scare them into leaving.  It is hard to say, but I do not believe this was racially motivated. I don't think race is a factor here, I think it was invading the land of someone who had no immediate protection and decided to protect himself. I do hope there will be a peaceful outcome for the people of that community. They should weigh all sides of the confrontation before coming to the conclusion that it was racially motivated. Peace to everyone in the area and hope this will be dealt with to everyone's favor.
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on February 08, 2018, 03:32:29 PM
http://thestarphoenix.com/news/local-news/gerald-stanley-trial-witness-admits-lying-to-police-about-rifle-groups-alcohol-consumption

Excerpt:

Quote
Jackson, 24, told court Thursday that Cross-Whitstone was the driver on Aug. 9, 2016. She said Cross-Whitstone had been drinking, was driving ?recklessly? when they were heading home from the river and swerved off the road at one point, causing one of the vehicle?s tires to pop. She said she was feeling drunk and tired and fell asleep in the back of the SUV shortly after that.

Cross-Whitstone, 18, told the jury he?d been driving drunk and had a .22-calibre rifle in the back of the SUV.

He said when police interviewed him 24 hours after Boushie died he was ?half cut? because he?d had so much to drink and didn?t tell the truth about drinking or having a gun. He said he also lied about those things while under oath at Stanley?s preliminary hearing in April 2017.

?It?s not normal for someone to see something like that. I was terrified. I didn?t know what to say. I was young, I was stupid, I?ve changed a lot since that happened and I?m willing to face the consequences,? Cross-Whitstone told court.

?I was scared for myself and I was scared for the people there, that they might get in trouble, and I knew I was wrong, but that?s just how I was feeling over there because I was scared out of my mind, I didn?t know what to say.?


Cassidy Cross-Whitstone outside Battleford Court of Queen?s Bench on Feb. 1, 2018. MICHELLE BERG / SASKATOON STARPHOENIX

Cross-Whitstone told the jury that, after leaving the river, he drove the SUV onto three farms. At the first farm, no one left the vehicle, he said. At the second farm, he said he and Meechance attempted to steal a truck and he used his rifle to try to break the window, but the rifle broke.

Cross-Whitstone said he lied to police and at the preliminary hearing about attempting to steal that day.

After the rifle broke, Cross-Whitstone said he snapped out of a blackout, realized what he was doing was wrong, and decided to go to another farm to ask for help. He said he drove onto Stanley?s farm, but before he could ask for help Meechance jumped out of the SUV and got onto one of Stanley?s quads.
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: debbiec on February 08, 2018, 03:44:37 PM
Taken from the first post:
Quote
Edited to add: In the beginning of this case stories were fabricated and even now, stories are still being made, as one lawyer pointed out and the witness who had fabricated, agreed. If one wants justice and not revenge, it is in the best interests to speak the truth to media and police, especially the police. What the heck can truth and reconciliation provide when so much is based on fabrication?
I have changed my mind ... this wasn't so much a case of vigilante justice as it was self protection after continued targeting of farmers. Farmers who were hard working and ran their butts off providing their families with livelihood. NO ONE has a RIGHT to steal from them. CRA takes enough.

Well said sap. After reading all the posts, I totally agree.
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: jellybean on February 08, 2018, 06:31:09 PM
I recall seeing on the news, months ago,   these farmers being interviewed on camera.

They were being targeted and feared for their lives and their livestock.
They felt that they did not have any protection from the law.
They were warned by RCMP that they could be charged if they killed someone on their land.

That news was very unsettling to me.  What could these farmers do.... As they said, by the time the RCMP are able to arrive, it might be too late to save the farmer, and his land.

Very sad that a young native lost his life, and this farmer has been put through hell and back.
While Idle no More should give these young people something to do with their time. And it should not cost billions of dollars to keep them busy.

Both sides the whites and aboriginals need to sit down and have a frank discussion.  Discuss the fears that they have about one another, and where they would like to end up within their relationships in society.

Truth and reconciliation works both ways, in my opinion.  It is not strictly a native issue - non aboriginals have their concerns and issues as well, where natives are concerned.

It is a complex problem, only because we allow it to be.Troubled youth?  Natives don't own it - we have our own as well.  Poverty?  We have that too! Drugs, alcohol issues in the family?  We share that too. 

We share more common social issues than we do differences. And we need to talk.
A community that needs to heal must start somewhere.

Perhaps  meetings are a good beginning.  A neutral place to share common things, common concerns,  would be a very good start.  And that does not cost money.  Giving and sharing and learning from one another  is free.

My very sincere condolenses to the Bushie family in the loss of their son. A son Gone too Soon, brings so much pain.  And my thoughts go out to  the Stanley family as they go through their terrible ordeal.
A tragedy that might have been averted, if only things had been different.

PEACE
jb




 






Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on February 08, 2018, 11:41:43 PM
I agree with you JB, we share the same problems. However it is the way problems are handled, or not, that makes a difference in a child's/teens life. Parents need to be aware of what kids are doing and set them straight. Is it happening?

How many communities are now working together with first nations to understand? I do know that the St. Albert community has begun to come together in truth and reconciliation. 
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: jellybean on February 09, 2018, 01:51:10 PM
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatoon/gerald-stanley-trial-jury-deliberations-continue-1.4527807

Jury deliberations in Gerald Stanley's murder trial focus on moment Colten Boushie shot
Jurors can find Sask. farmer guilty of 2nd-degree murder or manslaughter, or not guilty
By Jason Warick, CBC News Posted: Feb 09, 2018 7:06 AM CT Last Updated: Feb 09, 2018 1:00 PM CT

Jurors are expected to listen to several hours of audiotaped testimony today as they continue deliberations to determine the fate of Gerald Stanley, the Saskatchewan farmer charged in the death of Colten Boushie.

The 56-year-old farmer has pleaded not guilty to second-degree murder. Boushie, 22, was shot in August 2016.

The trial at Battleford Court of Queen's Bench, approximately 130 kilometres northwest of Saskatoon, is nearing the end of its second week. Following jury selection, witness testimony and closing arguments from Crown and defence lawyers, the seven-woman, five-man jury was sequestered and began deliberating Thursday afternoon.

Listen to episode 4 of CBC Saskatchewan's original podcast 'Boushie'
'Hearsay' from Reddit and other things the Gerald Stanley trial jury didn't hear

Just before 8:30 p.m. CST, the jury submitted a written request to Chief Justice Martel Popescul to listen again to certain portions of the testimony by Stanley and his son, Sheldon Stanley.

Much of the testimony covered details in the hours and minutes before the vehicle containing Boushie entered the Stanley farm's yard.
'I just wasn't thinking straight': Gerald Stanley cross-examined at his 2nd-degree murder trial

'Use your collective common sense': Jury now deliberating verdict at Gerald Stanley trial
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on February 09, 2018, 06:42:56 PM
OMG! According to Reddit Heresay, he confessed to police! I have no idea about Reddit or how they get their information ... whether it was straight from police or ??

How far can people be pushed before they explode and do the unthinkable? There are many articles on the Web regarding break and enters and high end thefts from farmers in that particular area in Sask. It must be bad if farmers have a gun at ready. I don't condone such retributive violence at all but the farmers are also between a rock and a hard place. Farmers don't have a steady cash flow monthly and replacing costly quads and other such necessary equipment can be costly ... especially if insurance refuses to cover them because they live in a high risk area. That happened to me when I lived in the north ... slashed tires ... I was told insurance won't cover because of that very reason. There are many thefts of cattle in Sask as well ... that is thousands of dollars that cannot be put back in the farm.

My husband and I farmed near (15 miles) a metis settlement and never had any problems here in northwestern Ab. (different area from above) When skilled laboring jobs were at a minimum here, some of the young lads took to fishing and selling fish fresh caught ... and I was thankful for that because we loved the fresh fried fish. Some youths worked for a land speculator clearing land and they would drop in for fresh water occasionally and I made sure they also had enough food. Never any problems. So what is the difference? I have not a clue.

So in Sask this has been going on for years. Where are the elders who teach these young people? Do they not teach them to respect everyone else's property?

I am sorry for the family and relatives of Colten that this tragedy happened, I really am! But anger and retribution will not fix a long brewing feud.

eta: Then there is this type of thing ... I wonder if initially the thefts were blamed on aboriginals in the area?
   https://www.realagriculture.com/2016/02/sask-farmer-charged-with-1-2-million-in-equipment-thefts/
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: capeheart on February 10, 2018, 11:06:26 AM
SAP1, I totally agree with what you are saying on this case. I do believe the elders should be telling youth to respect property and to find some kind of entertainment for themselves and sports, such as fishing and hockey. I think the elders are not putting themselves in the farmer's place, what they would do if four youths came on their property when they were not invited. I also believe that the three other youths that were with Colten, should come clean and tell the real reason they went on Mr. Stanley's property. If they would tell the truth of the reasons they went there, they could stop a lot of disruption and make things quiet down, so to say. It is a horrible thing to happen, a young man died while out with his friends, whatever they had in mind that particular day. Let us just forget that he was a native young man, he could have been a young white man, accompanied by other friends. I believe the outcome would have been the same, the farmer would be suspect of them being on his property for a negative reason and would have acted in the same manner. I do not believe there was any target of his ethnic background at all. I think it was a situation that all went very bad for everyone.  We wish them all peace. Thoughts and prayers to everyone involved in this matter. 8) 8) 8) 8)
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on February 10, 2018, 12:41:09 PM
Agreed Cape. When the farmer saw one person jump out and head for his quad, I really doubt race was on his mind. He was worried about his wife whom he could not see and the loss of a farm necessity. I think of all the provinces, Sask has been embroiled in race problems for a very long time. Whether the thoughts are justified, I have no clue.
What happened to summer ball games that keep youth entertained, rather than sitting by the river and getting high. Southern Sask always had ball games on weekends years ago.
I joined a Royal Purple group when I lived in the country and we catered with fast food shacks to many a ball game. The best teams were always aboriginals. They practiced hard and played hard. No time for drinking by the river. 
 
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: jellybean on February 10, 2018, 12:51:32 PM
There is so much hatred and anger within that community.  The verdict has the Aboriginals and Metis focused on the unfair bias systematically given to the native people within the court system.
The death of this young man has politicized,,,,, further raising the tensions within the white and aboriginal/metis communities.

In fact, when I first saw it on tv, (the farmers concerns], there was no mentioning of natives being the culprits whatsoever.  It is only recently did I learn that this young man was native.

If one looks at the matter and leaves the colour of his skin out of the equation, it can lead one to simple facts.

The trial was about a man who  shot a youth on his property.  He was found not
guilty, The youth had no business being there in the first place.

I  thought that Mr. Stanley should receive something, but he did not.

I was surprised to learn that there were no Aboriginals on the jury.

Whos is to say what the outcome would have been.  It might have been a hung one.

The Bouchies will appeal.  Honestly, I had tears in my eyes when I watched the Bouchie family on tv when the verdict of Not Guilty was given, and the passionate words of their defence lawyer in response to the verdict gave me food for thought.

This trial aside, we really need to think about our jury system, to make sure that there is a cross section of cultures within it, especially where serious charges are involved.

jb

Everyone loses.
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on February 10, 2018, 12:57:47 PM
Stanley acquitted. Long article with videos, twitter, etc. I really thought it would be at least manslaughter. I`m happy to read that Justice Minister Jody Wilson-Raybould will meet with the Boushie family. I find her a refreshingly intelligent, knowledgeable, fair minded and calm person ... exactly what a grieving family requires.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatoon/gerald-stanley-colten-boushie-verdict-1.4526313

Some excerpts:

Several people in the courtroom yelled "Murderer!" seconds after a Saskatchewan jury found Gerald Stanley not guilty of killing Colten Boushie early Friday evening.

The Battleford Court of Queen's Bench jury began deliberating Thursday afternoon and returned its verdict Friday evening.

Bobby Cameron, the chief of the Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations, spoke at FSIN's North Battleford office at a hastily-called press conference two hours after the trial's conclusion.

Cameron expressed deep skepticism about Stanley's assertion that the gun he was holding accidentally went off, killing Boushie.

"In this day and age, when someone can get away with killing somebody, when someone can get away with saying, 'I accidentally walked to the storage shed, I accidentally grabbed a gun out of the storage box and I accidentally walked back to the car and then I accidentally raised my arm in level with the late Colten Boushie's head, then my finger accidentally pushed the trigger' ? what a bunch of garbage," said Cameron before tightly-packed crowd.

Trudeau 'can't imagine' family's grief
Cameron said Justice Minister Jody Wilson-Raybould has promised to meet with the Boushie family in the near future.

The high-profile trial has drawn attention across Canada, and both Wilson-Raybould and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau acknowledged the verdict on social media on Friday night.

Thank you PM @JustinTrudeau. My thoughts are with the family of Colton Boushie tonight. I truly feel your pain and I hear all of your voices. As a country we can and must do better - I am committed to working everyday to ensure justice for all Canadians.

After the verdict was read out and people left the courtroom in shock, many members of the Boushie family went into a private room on the second floor of the courthouse. Loud sobbing and screams ? including "Colten! Colten! Colten!" ? could be heard through the door.

"This is not right. Something has to be done about this!" said Alvin Baptiste, Boushie's uncle, after the verdict was read aloud.


Alvin Baptiste, Colten Boushie's uncle, says there is no justice for his nephew1:37

Outside the courthouse, Baptiste said to reporters the justice system has to change to serve First Nations people.

"We will not give up our fight for justice," Boushie's cousin Jade Tootoosis said on the courthouse steps, adding that her family has felt uncomfortable and victimized throughout the process.

'There was no justice served here': Colten Boushie's cousin Jade Tootoosis reacts to Gerald Stanley's not guilty verdict1:12

"I ask you to try and understand the nearly bottomless disappointment" of the family, said Chris Murphy, the Boushie family lawyer, referring to the apparent lack of any Indigenous people from the 12-person jury. (CBC News has no way to independently determine at this time whether any of the jurors have Indigenous backgrounds.)

Chris Murphy outside Battleford courthouse after Gerald Stanley verdict
'I ask you to try and understand [their] nearly bottomless disappointment,' said Boushie family lawyer Chris Murphy. (Jason Warick/CBC)

"There is a darkness that exists in this country," said Murphy. "I believe we are going to have feel our way out of it."

'We are all hurting'
Kimberly Jonathan, vice-chief of the Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations, said the verdict is a continuation of the atrocities Indigenous people have faced in Canada, citing the residential school system and the Sixties Scoop.

Jonathan also urged all First Nations people to be peaceful in the aftermath.

FSIN Vice Chief Kim Jonathan after verdict
Kim Jonathan, vice -chief of the Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations, reacts to the verdict outside the courthouse. (Jason Warick/CBC)

"The family called for calm. The family prayed for peace," she said.

"We're are all hurting. We all face racism. Everyone sees it. I see it as a mother."

Senior Crown Prosecutor Bill Burge did not rule out an appeal. He said they would evaluate their options.

Bill Burge Crown prosecutor after Colten Boushie verdict
Crown prosecutor Bill Burge did not comment when asked if he was surprised by the verdict. (Jason Warick/CBC)

"There's never any winner in a case like this," he told reporters outside the courthouse.


'We didn't leave anything out': Senior Crown Prosecutor Bill Burge says his team will examine its position in near future3:05

When asked if he was surprised by the verdict, Burge declined to reply.

Boushie and four other young people from the Red Pheasant Cree Nation reserve drove onto Stanley's rural property in an SUV on Aug. 9, 2016.

An altercation occurred between them, Stanley, his son and his wife.

Supporters of the Boushie family rally outside the courthouse after the verdict. (Jason Warick/CBC)

What the verdict options were
The jury could have found Stanley guilty of second-degree murder or manslaughter, or not guilty, according to Chief Justice Martel Popescul, who oversaw the trial.

"What this trial comes down to is whether Gerry acted reasonably," Stanley's lawyer, Scott Spencer, told the jury.

"It's a tragedy, but it's not criminal. You must acquit."​

Gerald Stanley testified in his own defence during the trial
The judge advised jurors on how to navigate the contradictions in testimony
Senior Crown prosecutor Bill Burge told the jury that Stanley lied about some of the events leading up to the shooting, including that the gun went off accidentally.

"[The trigger] was pulled intentionally. I'm suggesting that's murder," Burge said.

Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: jellybean on February 10, 2018, 01:28:50 PM
People are people, regardless of culture.  I bet today, that there are independent thinkers within both the native and the white communities.

There could well be some natives and metis who shake their heads and wonder why these young people were drinking, driving, and being on private property.  The flat tire reason, did not hold up.

And hopefully warn their own youth to stay away from the farmers land.

Meanwhile, there will be townsfolk, who will wonder if Mr. Stanley pulled the trigger intentionally, or is it possible that it went off accidentally?  This will be talked and debated by townsfolk and natives for years to come.   Mr. Stanley will have to carry that with him.

jb
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on February 10, 2018, 02:24:34 PM
I'm sure there are many independent thinkers, JB. How Colten died is very tragic and violent and that is a picture that is extremely difficult for family and friends, and emotions running high is understandable.
One of the young people who was in the car stated how terrified he was and how that all changed him to be a better person ... the name is Cassidy Cross. 
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: jellybean on February 10, 2018, 02:26:21 PM
why did Stanley use a pistol?

jb
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: capeheart on February 10, 2018, 03:51:48 PM
I would say that Mr. Stanley had a weapon close at hand for his own protection at any time. If things are like you say they are in that area, I guess the weapon was in an area he could get it quickly.  I absolutely do not believe that Mr. Stanley meant to kill Colten Boushie. I just cannot imagine him as a family man, pointing the gun and pulling the trigger as to premeditate the death. I believe things happened very quickly and that the jury got the verdict right. I believe people should take a big step back and realize what can happen when you go to another person's property and plan on committing an offence. The fact is, nobody really has told the truth of why they were there. But I still do not believe Mr. Stanley had plans to kill anybody. I think he was in fear of the family's safety and it happened exactly as he said. Trudeau is speaking for all Canadians and say they are all angry at the outcome of the trial. Well he is not right in his comments, he should not make a statement like that.  A jury sat in on the trial and made the decision and Trudeau should have explained his comments. In this case it is all a very gray area.  I am so sorry for the Boushie family and I am also very sorry for the Stanley family. Again, praying for peace in the community in the future days ahead. I also believe that Mr. Stanley is as upset and torn by what happened as any other person.  :o :o :o :o :o








Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on February 10, 2018, 04:45:00 PM
I also do not want Trudeau speaking for me especially because of the repercussions and fall out those very words can have. What does that do for the jury people? I would not want to be a jury member in that trial mainly because there is a possibility they could be targeted with harm because it may seem to some people the jury are prejudiced. Trudeau has no damn right to speak for all of us and I do not want to feel we are to blame for their injuries in case that would happen.

I was thinking about jury selection and we all know that usually a large number of people are selected from which a small number are chosen according to how they answer certain questions. If there is any indication they are already well informed and have made a choice as to guilt or not, they may not be chosen as a juror. Possibly that is why no aboriginal jurors were chosen?
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on February 10, 2018, 05:00:40 PM
First article on this page link is for everyone who is hurting in some way over this tragedy in Saskatchewan. The author is a very strong person and has managed to transcend tragedy.

 http://www.unsolvedcanada.ca/index.php?topic=5473.0
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: capeheart on February 10, 2018, 05:31:11 PM
SAP1, there was an actual discussion on TV today related to native persons being selected for jury duty... We will possibly see this discussed at a later date.   I also do not want Trudeau mentioning anything such as speaking for all Canadians.  The jury has spoken in this case and they should not be spoken about negatively in any way.  We were not at the trial. We did not hear the evidence. I am sure that the evidence was presented in such a way that the jury made their decision based on the presentation of the solicitors and the Crown. :o :o :o :o :o 
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: jellybean on February 10, 2018, 07:07:09 PM
Quote
sap1.
I was thinking about jury selection and we all know that usually a large number of people are selected from which a small number are chosen according to how they answer certain questions. If there is any indication they are already well informed and have made a choice as to guilt or not, they may not be chosen as a juror. Possibly that is why no aboriginal jurors were chosen?

I wondered about that as well.  I wonder how many were turned away and the reasons.
I wonder how many whites were turned away, and the reasons.

I do know that the defendant has a say in the jury selection, and I do know that a reason is not necessary.... one can go by the looks of a potential juror.   A gut feeling that the defendant would have about a potential juror.

I do believe the jury studied all of the evidence in a very somber manner and I hope there is no backlash to the jurors.  I do wonder why Mr. Stanley was not found guilty of careless use of a firearm, or some such thing. No doubt the jury had to tackle the basic question foremost, and anything else was secondary?  Not sure if the jury were given that option when a decision was made.

\
Quote
The young people had been drinking during the day and some of them said they were drunk, according to the statements they gave police. They were riding in Ms. Wuttunee's grey 2003 Ford Escape. At about 5:30 pm they arrived at the Stanley farm, after, according to the document, visiting a neighbouring farm belonging to the Fouhy family, where they "attempted to steal vehicles and items," the ITO says.

I agree with you about Trudeau. He disappointed me.  He was going on the side of numbers who were displeased with the verdict. Versus one family and 12 jurors.  He should not have taken sides.
Smooth talk to smooth things over is next on the government's agenda

jb


Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: capeheart on February 10, 2018, 09:18:44 PM
It is the crown and defence that go through the lawyers, there are many people who are called to pick out 12 jurors. I've been in the courtroom when they made jury selection, it is quite a process.  It takes quite a while, there are many people called and you have no idea why some are denied. Some don't want to sit and give an excuse, health reasons or whatever. They ask them questions and so on and you have no idea why they picked them. It is a fair process that they do.
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on February 11, 2018, 02:29:47 AM
I just remembered hearing this before, that a jury is usually chosen as peers of the defendant. Is that correct? Young white males were also discluded from being jurors in this case.

Also when one gets the letter (3 full legal pages) there is not much wiggle room to not show up. One must show up and if one fails to do so, it is considered contempt of court. I was called when there was a spat of cases, one of which was Punky Gustafson, and I could not take all that time off work in case it was long and sequestered and I found one tiny little phrase in those three pages that covered me. A co-worker was also called and he said there were more than a hundred people interviewed before cuts.

I hope there is no more violence around this case.

 
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on February 11, 2018, 04:50:05 PM
I just saw this article. So many police officers descended onto Baptiste's residence the night Colten died elsewhere. No comfort given to the mother of Colten ... along with the words, "Colten is dead". Instead the residence was searched like a criminal's. There were 6 officers there at one time. If there were that many officers on one shift, they have enough officers to man the farm country, imo.
If this kind of behavior doesn't stop there is no hope of bringing peace and get both sides together and talking.
More info at link below.

  https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/colten-boushie/article32451940/

Excerpt:
The flash of headlights in the darkness drew Debbie Baptiste to the window. Outside she could see a convoy of vehicles barreling down a quiet dirt road that runs through Saskatchewan's Red Pheasant reserve. The cars pulled in to her yard at speed and cut across the rain-soaked grass to surround the trailer.

"I think they're here for us," Ms. Baptiste said to her son William, who was watching TV on the couch.

The two of them went to the door. Thoughts of her son Colten, who was late getting home that night, ran through Ms. Baptiste's mind. He was the baby of the family, the one who normally stayed close to her. So many police descending at once couldn't be good news.

Four uniformed RCMP officers approached their trailer, while several others stood watch outside, Ms. Baptiste said. Some officers had their weapons out and were scanning the property as though they were prepared for trouble, according to several witnesses.

"Is Colten Boushie your son?" the officers asked.

"Yes, he is," Ms. Baptiste replied.

"He's deceased," one of the officers told her.


Ms. Baptiste couldn't comprehend what she was hearing. Colten was the gentle one, the optimist, the one who persevered when his crippled arm briefly prevented him from working. He was a ceremonial fire keeper whose certificates of good citizenship she'd kept in a folder since he was five.

She let out a scream so urgent and anguished that those who heard it recall it with a shudder. She fell to her knees right there on the porch.

One of the officers said, "Somebody take her inside."

Ms. Baptiste lay on the floor of the trailer with her hands pressed to her head, rocking back and forth. The officers entered without asking permission and without offering much comfort, Ms. Baptiste said, an account confirmed by William.

"They were all in the living room. It was standing room only, all cops," Ms. Baptiste said.

The officers walked through each room with flashlights, waking William's two young sons.

"They searched everything, like they were looking for somebody, or something," Ms. Baptiste said.

The way they were treated struck them as callous, Ms. Baptiste and her sons later said. They want to know why, at a time of such distress, police rummaged through the family home, as though they'd done something wrong.

The RCMP have not provided a detailed response to the complaints raised by Colten's family, saying the matter is before the courts.

"These reports are concerning to us," Saskatchewan RCMP said in a written statement. "Full details will be released through court proceedings and we encourage the public and media agencies who wish to learn the circumstances to follow the court process."

Ms. Baptiste's son William said he knows they were searching the home because he had shut Colten's pet Chihuahua, Chico, in the closet, planning to jokingly tell Colten that his dog had run off because he'd been gone too long. When the officers entered the back room Chico, now free, ran into the living room.

After a few minutes an officer tried to force a weeping Ms. Baptiste to her feet.

"He grabbed my wrist right here and he said 'Ma'am, get yourself together.' And I told him, 'No,'" Ms. Baptiste recalled.


She was in denial, begging the officer to take her to the body so she could prove it wasn't her son: "You've got the wrong person. That's not my son lying out there. He's not dead. That's not Colten. It's somebody else," she told him.

He responded by asking if she was drunk.

"He said, 'Ma'am, was you drinking?' And I said 'No.' And then he smelled my breath," she said.

At her most desperate hour she recoiled. She felt insulted, hurt, confused. She hadn't been drinking. Why would they ask that?

William and his brother Jace Baptiste said the officers also asked if they'd been drinking. They hadn't. They were waiting for Colten to return home. They even had his dinner ready in the microwave, they told the police. An officer walked over and opened the microwave to check if this was true, an act so presumptuous Ms. Baptiste and her sons dwell on it every time they tell the story of that night. Would the officer have acted the same way in the home of a white family that had just been notified of their son's murder? Ms. Baptiste doesn't think so.

Tash and Marie Baptiste, relatives who had watched in alarm as the convoy of police vehicles swept in, were initially blocked from joining their family inside. They were eventually allowed in, and their accounts match those of Ms. Baptiste and her sons. They counted roughly a dozen officers inside and outside and at least six police vehicles surrounding the trailer. Police were searching the home and surrounding area and some had guns drawn. Tash and Marie said they gathered the two young children to shield them from the chaos.

"They were going in and out of those bedrooms," Tash Baptiste said. She remembers vividly that William's three-year-old son J.J. was wide-eyed with fear.

"That kid wouldn't let me go," she said. "He was shaking like he was traumatized. He didn't know what was going on."

Jace said the officers were inside the house for about 20 minutes. When Jace asked why they were searching, the officers told him they were looking for Cassidy Whitstone, who had been with Colten earlier that day.

"The first thought that came into my mind was "What did we do? Why are all these officers on us?," Ms. Baptiste said. "My son was the victim. But I thought that we did something wrong."
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: jellybean on February 11, 2018, 06:28:58 PM
I read that too, and I thought "how cruel and insensitive".  There is no excuse for treating Colten's mother that way.  It should have been handled with some sense of dignity. No one was drinking in the home and that shows what the RCMP believes about Aboriginals in general.... Smelling their breath was so ignorant.... Oh I am sure they would say, that it is dangerous being in a home when drinking is involved, blah, blah..... however......and what could we say about that?  They would have us over a barrel, saying, well you would be surprised how they can turn on you and be dangerous when they are drinking, so we asked them "Have you been drinking" 
What could we say to that?

RCMP become "Reserve Weary"  Perhaps they spend a lot of time out there, looking for someone.
 If only they had placed Ms. Bouchie in the squad car, or taken her to the back room and gently give her the terrible news there,  and to have the Chief of the Reserve come to the Boushie home, after the police had checked the Boushie place  for persons with firearms, to take her and the kids to his home to care for her, it might have been different.

They can check that darn microwave for Colton's supper, and look for further firearms after Ms. Boushie was removed.

As to the cop cars and police with handguns drawn........ The incidents [there were two] involved firearms, and two of the perps escaped, so they had to go to CB's home to look for them. Might well have been that the two were known to the RCMP.

Of course,  they would not take any chances in case there was a shoot out.  I told myself, that is how they are trained, and that is how they work. They cannot take chances.

That 20 minutes in the trailer could have been better spent by removing the kids and Ms. Bouschie from the home - first!!

I am not white washing their behaviour..... some sensitivity was warranted here.  They were ignorant and cruel.   No excuses, but I do understand the cars, officers and guns drawn......sadly.
How Ms. Bouschie was told and the manner in which they treated her is sickening, and they owe this grieving mother  a public apology.

jb

Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: jellybean on February 11, 2018, 11:21:45 PM
I found this -  I cannot snip it for obvious reasons /jb

https://saskatoon.ctvnews.ca/from-day-one-a-timeline-of-gerald-stanley-s-trial-1.3798399

From day one: A timeline of Gerald Stanley?s trial

Jan. 29
About 200 people show up in Battleford for jury duty.
Seven women and five men ? plus two alternates ? are selected to serve.
None are visibly Indigenous, prompting comments of frustration from Boushie?s family.
?It was really difficult to sit there today and watch every single visible Indigenous person be challenged by the defence,? his cousin, Jade Tootoosis, tells media.

Jan. 30
Chief Justice Martel Popescul, who presided over the trial, starts the day by notifying court the two alternates selected the previous day will be filling for two jurors he says he excused.
Prosecutor Bill Burge then opens the Crown?s case.
He outlines details of Boushie?s death, stating the 22-year-old was shot once in an SUV on the Stanley farm Aug. 9, 2016.
The bullet entered behind his left ear and exited through the side of his neck.
Three spent casings found at the scene match a Tokarev handgun from Stanley?s home, Burge says. Eleven guns ? two of which were pellet guns ? were found on the property.
Boushie?s DNA was on the Tokarev, Burge says. Gunshot residue was on Stanley?s hands.
Burge promises testimony from Stanley?s son and calls two RCMP officers.
The first officer, Cpl. Terry Heroux, shows photos from the scene and outlines the investigative process.
Court hears the SUV, with its door open, was left at the scene for two days. Forty-four millimetres of rain came down in the area within that time and much of Boushie?s blood in the SUV washed away.
The second officer, a blood-stain-pattern analyst, is Sgt. Jennifer Barnes.
Stanley?s defence lawyer, Scott Spencer, questions the police investigation, stating the defence was not able to see the SUV before the vehicle was towed from the scene.

Jan. 31
Const. Andrew Park tells court he believes a rifle stock found at a farm northeast of the Stanley property matches a stock missing from a rifle found at the scene.
He says he received a report, while on the Stanley farm, of an attempted break-in to a truck on the other property.
Stanley?s son, Sheldon, then takes the stand.
Sheldon testifies hearing someone start a quad in their yard, after an SUV drove onto the farm.
He says he believes someone from the SUV was trying to steal from the property.
He hit the SUV?s windshield with a hammer as the vehicle tried to drive away, and then went to the house to grab truck keys, he says.
He tells court he heard three shots before seeing his dad, standing close to the SUV, holding a gun and a clip.
?I don?t know what happened. It just went off. I just wanted to scare them,? Stanley said, according to his son.
A rifle, missing a stock, fell out of the SUV when two women who were in the vehicle pull Boushie?s body out, Sheldon says.
He testifies he then called 911.
Eric Meechance, who was with Boushie and three others the day of the shooting, tells court the group had spent the day target shooting, drinking Crown Royal and swimming in a river in the area.
The five were on a nearby farm before they drove onto the Stanley property, he testifies.
He says one of the five tried to break into a red truck on the other farm using a rifle, but is adamant the group did not enter the Stanley yard to steal.
He takes issue with Stanley?s lawyer describing the group as armed.
?I wouldn?t say armed,? Meechance says. ?That gun wasn?t whipped out anytime on that farm.?
The 23-year-old says he and another person flee after the SUV hits a parked vehicle.
He heard two gunshots while running away, he says.

Feb. 1
Cassidy Cross, who was also with Boushie, admits in court to lying in previous statements.
He testifies he broke a rifle trying to break into a truck on a different farm the same day, but says he drove the SUV onto the Stanley property only to seek help with a flat tire.
He recalls someone hitting the SUV?s windshield with a hammer and the vehicle striking another vehicle on the Stanley farm, before he and Meechance fled.
?We didn't think about it. We just ran. I was scared out of my mind," Cross says.
Belinda Jackson, who was in the SUV?s backseat when Boushie was killed, also admits to telling RCMP a different story but testifies she saw Stanley shoot Boushie in the head.
She tells court she heard someone say, ?Go get a gun,? about a minute before the fatal shooting.
She also says she saw a ?younger man? on the property go into the house prior to the shooting, while another man walked into a garage and grabbed a handgun.
The man who grabbed the handgun, who she later identified as Stanley, shot Boushie, she testifies.
The other man was holding what she believed was a shotgun when he exited the home, she says.
Forensic firearms expert Greg Williams begins his testimony, stating he found ?an unusual bulge? in a cartridge found on the SUV?s dash.
The cartridge is one of the three spent casings matched to Stanley?s Tokarev handgun.
He?s ultimately unsure what created the bulge, but notes a hang fire ? a delay between when the trigger is pulled and when the bullet fires ? alone wouldn?t cause the abnormal casing.
Hang fires are rare, he says.
The Tokarev handgun fired normally when tested, he also states.

Feb. 2
Williams? testimony continues.
He tells court he tested 36 cartridges from 80 seized from the Stanley farm. One of the tested cartridges failed to fire, he says.
The Crown?s case closes.
John Ervin, a gun and ammunition expert, is called to the stand as the defence?s first witness.
He also testifies the Tokarev fired fine when tested, but he blames the bulged cartridge on a misaligned gun.
He says he couldn?t determine if the handgun hang fired or not.

Feb. 5
Spencer, Stanley?s defence lawyer, delivers his opening statement.
He calls the shooting a ?freak accident? and blames a hang fire.
His first witness of the day, Kim Worthington, the executive director of Saskatoon Youth for Christ, tells court he saw an SUV that was in bad shape the day of the shooting.
The next witness, Wayne Popowich, who contacted Spencer after seeing media coverage of the trial, tells court he?s experienced hang fires with delays between seven and 12 seconds.
He also testifies he?s experienced a hang fire that created a bulge, but says during cross-examination, that specific incident happened 40 years ago.
Another witness, Nathan Voinorosky, testifies he?s experienced a seven-second hang fire while target shooting.
Glennis Fouhy, from the farm the Boushie group was on before they drove to the Stanley property, also testifies.
Stanley is then called to the stand in his own defence. He?s the last witness to testify in the trial.
He outlines seeing the SUV drive onto the property and hearing someone start an ATV.
He describes his son hitting the windshield with a hammer and himself kicking the taillight.
He tells court he thought the SUV was leaving until it hit his wife?s parked vehicle.
He says he grabs the Tokarev handgun from his shop with the intent to scare the group away.
He recalls two men running from the scene after he fired what he says were warning shots straight into the air, but says he was in ?pure terror? because he thought his wife had been hit by the SUV.
He tells court he removed the gun?s magazine after firing the warning shots. The gun, in his right hand, fired when he reached into the SUV to turn off the vehicle with his left hand, he says.
?It just went off,? court hears.
He claims his finger wasn?t on the trigger.
Crown prosecutor Bill Burge then cross-examines Stanley, asking how many guns were in the home and about Stanley?s knowledge of gun handling.
?Did you learn not to point a gun at somebody?? Burge asks.
?Did you learn that if you pull a trigger that doesn?t go off you better treat this gun as something dangerous that might go off??
He also asks Stanley if he normally knows how many shells he loads into a clip.
Stanley replies he does on most days but now knows he was mistaken when he thought he loaded two bullets the day Boushie was shot.
The defence?s case closes.

Feb. 8
Both lawyers share their closing arguments.
Defence lawyer Scott Spencer begins, reiterating his argument the fatal shot was the result of a hang fire.
He describes the situation Stanley was in as a ?nightmare? and argues no evidence exists showing Stanley pulled the trigger.
?It?s a tragedy, but not criminal,? he tells court. "Some people aren't going to be happy. You have to do what is right based on the evidence you heard in this courtroom. You must acquit."

Crown prosecutor Bill Burge then delivers his closing statement.
Burge disputes the gun hang fired, pointing to the evidence presented by both gun experts, and disputes Stanley?s claim he thought the gun was empty.
?He's told you something that is demonstrably not true because there was another round in that clip,? Burge says.
He also argues Stanley handled the Tokarev carelessly, and points to parts of Stanley?s and Sheldon?s testimonies he says didn?t match.
Stanley said he ran to the SUV, while Sheldon testified he saw his father walk by the SUV, Burge says.

Jurors begin deliberations, after instructions from the judge.
The jury is given three options, according to Popescul: that Stanley is guilty of second-degree murder, that Stanley is guilty of manslaughter or that Stanley be acquitted.

Feb. 9
Jurors re-hear the full testimonies of Stanley and his son, during the morning and afternoon, before continuing deliberations.

A verdict is delivered at 7:30 p.m.
The courtroom is filled with members of Boushie?s family, the public and the media anxiously awaiting the reading.

Stanley is found not guilty.

Cries, shouts, gasps and swears are heard in court.
Some people yell, ?Murderer!? Others appear to be in disbelief.
Stanley is rushed out a side door by RCMP officers.

Boushie?s family members, their lawyer and several others comment outside court.
The family?s lawyer, Chris Murphy, asks people to imagine being ?in the skin? of Boushie?s mother, brothers and cousin following the death and during the investigative and legal processes.
Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations Vice-Chief Kimberly Jonathan points to residential schools and the ?60s Scoop in her comments on the verdict.
?We felt unsafe then, and we?re still unsafe. Someone can say it?s an accident to shoot any one of us, and they?re found not guilty,? she says.
Boushie?s cousin, Tootoosis, promises the family will fight for an appeal.
?We will not stop our pursuit for justice,? she says.
--- Video by Ed Sedgwick. Writing by Kevin Menz, with files from Angelina Irinici and The Canadian Press





 




Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on February 12, 2018, 12:19:57 AM
Quoting a snip from JB:

Quote
As to the cop cars and police with handguns drawn........ The incidents [there were two] involved firearms, and two of the perps escaped, so they had to go to CB's home to look for them. Might well have been that the two were known to the RCMP.

Ok, I had forgotten that part. I knew that some took off running when the gunfire began but didn't think they got too far and police detained them near the farm.
Still ... Ms. Bouchie was treated badly. She was not a villain. Now I understand why her brother shook the eagle feather in court.
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on February 12, 2018, 04:26:43 AM
Quote
Seven women and five men ? plus two alternates ? are selected to serve.
None are visibly Indigenous, prompting comments of frustration from Boushie?s family.
?It was really difficult to sit there today and watch every single visible Indigenous person be challenged by the defence,? his cousin, Jade Tootoosis, tells media.

I would think that relatives and anyone from the reserve would not be chosen as jurors because they had already made up their minds on guilt before the trial began. That is one of the questions prospective jurors have to answer iirc.


Quote
The first officer, Cpl. Terry Heroux, shows photos from the scene and outlines the investigative process.
Court hears the SUV, with its door open, was left at the scene for two days. Forty-four millimetres of rain came down in the area within that time and much of Boushie?s blood in the SUV washed away.
The second officer, a blood-stain-pattern analyst, is Sgt. Jennifer Barnes.
Stanley?s defence lawyer, Scott Spencer, questions the police investigation, stating the defence was not able to see the SUV before the vehicle was towed from the scene.

Crime scene investigation was really shoddy.
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: capeheart on February 12, 2018, 01:52:33 PM
Jellybean, thanks for the description of what happened on that particular day of the tragic event that brings us all to this discussion. I wasn't aware there were females involved in this, I just thought it was all male persons that were involved. I have a clearer picture of what happened and the more I hear, the more I think it was a bad day for everyone involved, no good ending for anybody. Also there was a gun involved with the parties earlier on, that had been broken. So there was a lot of things going on there, more people could have been harmed then were, actually. The Boushie family is having a meeting in Ottawa, so I am sure they will get some things resolved that they have issues with. Peace to everyone involved. We do not know what the RCMP had in mind when they went to the home. If they were searching for someone or they may have had issues there before. Day after day we see officers killed in the line of duty, ambushed and trying to carry out their duties.  The officers could have had a priest or someone come with them to tell the mom that her son was deceased.  They actually as you say, could have taken her outside to the vehicle to tell her what happened. Sensitivity surely could have been used in this situation.  :o :o :o :o
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on February 12, 2018, 05:48:37 PM
My heart is truly with those grieving but all this suffering could have been prevented long ago.

Young people need to find another pastime on weekends or days off. Swimming is great, but not also polishing off a bottle of crown royal and then driving through farm country with a shotgun in the car, and not stopping in at farms breaking into trucks etc. 
I hope this tragedy has been a lesson to those who were involved and they don't just rely on Ottawa to change rules for justice, thinking they did nothing wrong. They were all in the wrong and their friend died because of it.   
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: jellybean on February 12, 2018, 05:52:18 PM
http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/boushie-verdict-ottawa-parliament-meeting-1.4530880

'We feel a bit more hopeful': Boushie family in Ottawa to meet with ministers
Relatives of Colten Boushie want changes to justice system after Gerald Stanley found not guilty in his death
By Catharine Tunney, Marc-Andr? Cossette, CBC News Posted: Feb 11, 2018 4:14 PM ET Last Updated: Feb 12, 2018 4:24 PM ET

Colten Boushie's family members say they feel more hopeful following meetings with federal ministers Monday, after a not-guilty verdict in his shooting death sent shock waves throughout Canada.

"This is only the beginning of the conversation and calls to action," said Boushie's cousin, Jade Tootoosis.
"We have little to no faith in the justice system and we're here to talk about that."
Tootoosis flew to Ottawa late Sunday night with Boushie's mother, Debbie Baptiste, and his uncle Alvin Baptiste, two days after Saskatchewan farmer Gerald Stanley was found not guilty of second-degree murder.

Family lawyer Chris Murphy said a meeting with Carolyn Bennett, minister of Indigenous-Crown Affairs, lasted for more than two hours Monday morning. A subsequent meeting with Indigenous Services Minister Jane Philpott lasted 45 minutes.

Ministers say Canada must 'do better' after Boushie verdict
Video showing jury delivering Gerald Stanley verdict taken down from Facebook

The two ministers said their meetings were about listening and expressing condolences.
"They are standing strong," said Philpott. "Our goal was to listen to them, to hear their perspective. They've been through incredibly troubling times in the 18 months since this young man was killed and we wanted to hear their concerns."

Murphy said the trip has been about building relationships with politicians and officials on Parliament Hill ? not asking for an appeal.
"There's no way that relationships across this country are going to change unless there's empathy on both sides," he said.

and ----

Speaking to reporters Monday, Boushie's mother wore a #justiceforcolten T-shirt. She said that, for her, those words demand a change in the way Canada, and its justice system, treat Indigenous people.
"Somehow, Canada could come together, all its people could come together, and realize we're all human beings," she said.
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: jellybean on February 12, 2018, 06:02:37 PM
My heart is truly with those grieving but all this suffering could have been prevented long ago.

Young people need to find another pastime on weekends or days off. Swimming is great, but not also polishing off a bottle of crown royal and then driving through farm country with a shotgun in the car, and not stopping in at farms breaking into trucks etc. 
I hope this tragedy has been a lesson to those who were involved and they don't just rely on Ottawa to change rules for justice, thinking they did nothing wrong. They were all in the wrong and their friend died because of it.   

I agree with you very much sap1.

I am undecided as to whether to believe Mr. Stanley, I was not there for the trial, so it is left "hanging in the air" with me as to  guilt or innocent. or whether the trial was fair. I stand behind changes to the system to include aboriginals in juries, and to have aboriginal judges.

The farmers had been terrorized in that area for months.  Something terrible was going to happen that day ..... alcohol, drunk driving, attempting theft.

What and the heck were these young people thinking?  They had no respect for other people's land nor their belongings.  The brazen attempt to go onto 2 farms and to steal.
And in broad daylight... non the less.

I ask myself this question.  If they had been successful would they have stopped? Another farm, another day?

Asian, white, black or native - should not make a difference.

Coulton did not deserve to die, that is for certain. What a horrible price he paid.
Sadly, everyone lost that day and both sides' indigenous, and whites  are entrenched in the belief that their side is right. The problem lies with "the other guy" not them. 

jb
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on February 12, 2018, 06:38:48 PM
ITA JB. You said it better than I could have. No matter the color, creed or race ... one very just justice for all. All treated equally.
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: jellybean on February 12, 2018, 09:22:42 PM
https://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/canada/gofundme-page-for-gerald-stanley-draws-fury-amid-protests-calls-for-appeal/ar-BBJ2YF0?li=AAggFp5&item=personalization_enabled:false&OCID=ans

GoFundMe page for Gerald Stanley draws fury amid protests, calls for appeal

snipped

A fundraiser created to help Gerald Stanley recover his legal fees has prompted fury online, with many calling for GoFundMe to remove the page entirely.

The page reads that money raised will go to renovating Stanley's farm, repairing vehicles and paying off legal fees.
Twitter users spoke out saying they were "disgusted" and "deeply disappointed" by the website's decision to host the fundraiser.

"This organization does so much good, but I'll never see it the same way again," one Twitter user named Jean Knowles said of GoFundMe.

Others warned that several donations were made using racist pseudonyms, as well as under the names "Justin Trudeau" and "Sophie Gregoire Trudeau."

Not only are people donating to Gerald Stanley's gofundme, they are donating under the names of people who support Colten Boushie and under racist names like "chief red". @gofundme and @robsolomon1 still won't take it down though. Vile, racist, evil and so very Canadian.
? Sentient garbage bag/Law student (@sweatpantsrani) February 12, 2018

The online fundraiser was created by Sam Olsen of Maple Creek, Sask., on behalf of the Stanley family on Feb. 9.

While it's unclear how Olsen is acquainted with the family, GoFundMe confirmed to Global News in an email that the page is verified.

The statement explained that GoFundMe will not remove the page, which had collected $84,000 of its $100,000 goal by Monday afternoon.

"Given the jury verdict, this campaign does not violate our terms of service," spokeswoman Rachel Hollis said.

While GoFundMe said the page does not violate its policy, a petition on change.org is calling for the website to remove it.
The petition, created by Cassandra Miles of Issaquah, Wash., had received about 400 signatures by Monday afternoon.

"This is a slap in the face to The Boushie/Baptiste Family, First Nations People," the petition said of the fundraiser.

"Go Fund Me should take the platform down, refund every bit of that money or divert it to anti-hate crime causes, and issue a public apology IMMEDIATELY."


Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on February 13, 2018, 02:25:52 PM
https://www.gofundme.com/justice4colten

Excerpt:

We believe that Indigenous youth deserve safety and the ability to travel freely on these lands without fear of racism or persecution. We are not trespassers.
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: jellybean on February 13, 2018, 03:06:02 PM
Quote
In August 2016, Colten was shot and killed on a farm while out for a drive with his friends.

Wow, out for a drive with his friends? Totally laughable! 
People reading this fake news will believe it, if they have not followed the events in the paper, tv or radio.  Seems to be a few of them around who have not.

jb
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on February 13, 2018, 03:14:06 PM
Well that is what we have to get used to hearing because this is only the beginning. Downplay in one area and Up play in other areas. Prejudicial comments. There are many prejudices on both sides.
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: jellybean on February 13, 2018, 03:50:45 PM
So soon - and already it is getting out of hand - out there!

jb
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on February 13, 2018, 04:13:19 PM
And PM Trudeau is under fire by all other political parties regarding comments he made from California ... they and legal experts are saying that what Trudeau said via Twitter, could jeopardize an appeal for Colten. That is what happens when problems are not discussed/approached properly and reasonably ... everything began with a huge knee jerk and wham bam, off to Ottawa demanding to be heard. Political leaders then also had knee jerk reactions. Answers are demanded yesterday.
Colten Boushie is being used over a long smoldering hot pot of problems.

 https://globalnews.ca/news/4022425/colten-boushie-justin-trudeau-appeal/
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: jellybean on February 13, 2018, 05:05:37 PM
Quote
Colten Boushie is being used over a long smoldering hot pot of problems.

Yes, it feels like his death is being exploited. "

Some FN people are already whitewashing the incident where the kids were involved.  The kids did nothing wrong?

Perhaps they still believe the original story given to the Battleford Now news by one of the youths.  This story has since been dispelled in the trial.
Here is the link

http://battlefordsnow.com/article/528674/he-just-came-out-nowhere-biggar-shooting-witness-speaks

I am all for the Boushie family raising money - by GoFundMe. No doubt they can use it.  There will be lawyer fees, travel expenses, etc. 

But, the person who initiated the GFM  should not whitewash the kids behaviour. They were not out for a "Sunday drive". as is claimed.

In fairness, some  FN people should have been on that jury. That is a major complaint, and it is a reasonable one. in my opinion.

 If the FN people want our empathy (note, I did not say sympathy) and understanding of their general plight, and an agreement to see a balanced justice system, using Coltan's tragic death is not the way to go about it.  The general population have read the trial versions, as to what actually happened that day, and minimizing the behaviour of these young adults that day is anything but helpful to their cause.  It can undo all of the inroads that they have made for their causes.

Trust works both ways you know.
Sadly the first version of the youth as to events given in the newspaper was a lie.  The version changed during trial. Their stories of the event was  remarkably different.

People will believe whatever version they feel comfortable with I suppose.
I have a feeling that not everything came out at that trial - on both sides.

Is a retrial  warranted?.. Both sides were wrong that tragic day.
Two wrongs do not  make it right.

Unfortunately, I am now under the impression  the FN will only  settle for a guilty verdict, and should the verdict be the same - [not guilty] would they accept it?

There are too many things to be done..... lots of improvements on their lists are sorely needed. They will need the cooperation of the Provincial & Federal governments and it's people  to make any headway in progress for better living conditions, and the list goes on - and rightly so.
But dragging this trial into the mix may not be helpful in the long run.

[modified to include link to Battleford Now news)

jb


Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on February 13, 2018, 10:22:37 PM
Well that Sunday drive was to a river, lots of drinking, some swimming and then leaving there with a drunk person behind the wheel ... he swerved into a ditch which caused a tire to pop. Before going into Stanley`s driveway, they had been to two other farmers. They claimed they just drove away because no one was home and at the second farm they tried to smash into a truck leaving the stock of a gun there before heading to Stanley`s.
These farmers are all armed so they must be having problems with thefts. According to FB comments, there were alerts sent out when someone saw police in the area; comments made about scoring gas at times. All farmers have large gas tanks in their yards.
All their choices  that Sunday were very bad. They are all culpable.
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: jellybean on February 15, 2018, 01:14:55 AM
This article is snipped. 
https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/boushie-family-vows-to-seek-justice-system-changes/article37988696/

The family of slain Cree man Colten Boushie left Ottawa on Wednesday vowing to continue their fight for justice after securing from the federal government a commitment to change the jury-selection process.

and =

Justin Trudeau said that, as a country, Canada must commit to ensuring no family has to face what they've endured. He committed his government to making changes to the justice system that will include the way juries are selected.
and =

Eleanore Sunchild, a lawyer for the family, said that the work will also continue back in Saskatchewan. She mentioned pushing for reforms to legal aid, to ensure proper representation for Indigenous accused, as well as more sensitive treatment for the families of Indigenous victims of crime. "We hope that changes will be made to ensure the inclusion and fair treatment of Indigenous peoples in the Canadian justice system. The changes to jury selection is only one issue that needs to be addressed. There are other issues that were problematic in this case such as the RCMP's conduct," Ms. Sunchild said.

"The family chose to speak so that no more Indigenous people are forced to go through such a terrible ordeal. Justice for Colten is larger than the Gerald Stanley trial."
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: debbiec on February 15, 2018, 11:25:44 AM
I wonder how many of the public are actually aware of what proceeded this shooting, and what had been going on in that area for some time. As was stated in an earlier post, these 'boys' weren't out for a Sunday drive.
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on February 15, 2018, 11:39:17 AM
According to FB posts of some people ... they actually believe Colten was the one sleeping in the car when it entered Stanley's drive.
Some articles make it look as though Colten was the actual driver, while another report claims another man was at the wheel and when he jumped out of the car to check out the ATV, Colten shifted to the driver's side.
It is apparent to me that none of the media do any real fact checking.
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on February 15, 2018, 12:01:05 PM
Really people!! FN peoples are complaining that only their young men are thrown in jail. Do you think police do that for shits and giggles?!
The following link has links of what consequences followed some criminal behavior. When committing criminal offences and being armed while doing so, Police will do whatever force is necessary to keep themselves and the public secure.
You don't want to get shot and pursued? Don't live a life of crime! Simple!! How do you downplay reckless use of a firearm in public, and at officers of the law?
One media source claimed the victim of the police shooting was falsely accused and pointed out! Then there are reports he was into gang behavior.
Be honest! Hiding and whitewashing criminal behavior doesn't solve problems.

 https://www.google.ca/search?source=hp&ei=zcWFWuecEsek8QXog564BQ&q=RCMP+shoot+22+year+old+near+Onion+Lake&oq=RCMP+shoot+22+year+old+near+Onion+Lake&gs_l=psy-ab.3...1424.16182.0.17019.38.37.0.1.1.0.279.6939.2-28.28.0....0...1c.1.64.psy-ab..9.26.6205...0j0i131k1j0i10k1j33i22i29i30k1j33i21k1j33i160k1.0.JDqu3YYF5-Q
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: jellybean on February 15, 2018, 12:57:23 PM
 
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatoon/stanley-verdict-again-raising-concerns-over-rural-crime-1.4535146

'Frustrated and helpless': Rural residents say Stanley trial highlights crime, police response time concerns
RCMP says too many variables affect response times to be able to give accurate picture
By Charles Hamilton, CBC News Posted: Feb 14, 2018 4:15 PM CT Last Updated: Feb 15, 2018 11:19 AM CT

 Snipped.....
Feelings of frustration and helplessness are simmering in rural parts of Saskatchewan in the wake of the Gerald Stanley trial, which reignited long-standing concerns over crime and law enforcement's ability to adequately respond to it.
"I want the country to know it's a problem we have here," said Lee de Coninck Smith, the founder of a Facebook page called Farmers with Firearms.
Smith said the page was created to help people living in rural parts of the province cope with what he says is a growing problem of crime and slow RCMP response times. He says the idea is to have a place where neighbours can look out for each other.
The page has a prominent message warning that posts or comments containing racist remarks or promoting illegal activity will not be tolerated and that any such posts will be deleted, as will ones having to do with the Stanley trial.

Full coverage of Gerald Stanley trial
What happened on Gerald Stanley's farm the day Colten Boushie was shot, as told by witnesses

In recent months, the popularity of the page has exploded, and with close to 8,500 followers and more than 8,000 likes as of early Thursday.
Ryan, whose last name CBC agreed to withhold because of concerns he says he has for his safety, farms in southwestern Saskatchewan and is a member of the group. He says he knows neighbours and friends who've experienced theft.

"Frustrated and helpless would be the two things I would say [farmers feel]," he said in an interview with CBC News at his family farm Wednesday. "There's all walks of life that are committing these crimes.
"Snowmobiles, ATVs ? these are big-ticket items that are easy to grab and easy to get rid of. Anything that's not bolted down, it can be taken."
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on February 15, 2018, 01:28:03 PM
Police jurisdictions on the southern ends of provinces need to pull together and share info if they still are not doing so.
On FB and general comments, people blame FN people for ALL the crimes, especially now in light of the Boushie tragedy, however, there are reports of Americans crossing the border and committing crimes as well, especially thefts.
The following link shows somewhat high end vehicles ...  one with Idaho license plates. I can't get the video to load but as much as I can see, these are Caucasians. AND they are armed and will shoot to keep their stolen wares.
Back in the 70's there was a lot of cattle rustling going on down south as well and very organized big time liners used. It probably never stopped.

https://globalnews.ca/news/3630217/rcmp-search-for-suspects-who-shot-at-farm-shop-owner-in-southern-alberta/

A ranch hand who was shot at following a robbery in Springbank, Alta., told Global News the situation could have ?gone south in a hurry? if the thieves had ?turned their gun a separate way or misfired.?

RCMP said that on July 27, at around 7 a.m., employees interrupted the suspects as they were loading the stolen property onto a vehicle.

WATCH: Crimes on rural properties outside of Calgary seem to be on the rise. Several have recently been hit by thieves, and authorities worry they?re getting more brazen. Jill Croteau reports.

Dawson Northcott said he heard one of the ATVs leaving the ranch. He then pulled up the security camera feed on his phone to find the suspects in a Ford truck ?loading stuff onto the back of it.?

Northcott said that, as he was trying to get the license plate on the truck, it sped away.  He followed the truck only to be intercepted by a red SUV that pulled in front of him.

?It pulls off into a no exit road and the red SUV pulls up on my passenger side and shoots across my truck with a shotgun. So, when I pulled ahead, I let everyone go, because I wasn?t sticking around for that,? he said.

RCMP 5
RCMP are looking for this black Ford F150 and a red SUV with an Idaho license plate after a robbery in Springbank, Alta., on July 27, 2017.


He said he hadn?t expected the red SUV, which he had passed earlier as he was following the Ford truck, would be involved.

?My heart was racing,? he said.

Police are looking for a black Ford F-150 Fx4 with a red stripe down the side, with an Alberta licence plate, as well as a red SUV with an Idaho licence plate.

Anyone with information about this incident or any of the people involved is asked to call RCMP at (403) 851-8000 or contact Crime Stoppers.


? 2017 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: jellybean on February 15, 2018, 02:08:33 PM
I am beginning to think that getting out of the city and moving to a rural and peaceful area in the country is a myth. RCMP response times are often very late, due to the distance they must cover in patrolling their district, as an example. Not to mention slow response times for ambulances to arrive.

Country folk are sitting ducks for crime.

A good example is Trevor Vader, in Alberta who made his living stealing vehicles, and anything that wasn't nailed down, along with his buddies in a rural area of Alberta.   He ended up murdering an elderly couple who were on their way to BC and was found guilty.




jb


Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: jellybean on February 15, 2018, 02:44:08 PM
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatchewan/gerald-stanley-colten-boushie-jury-verdict-1.4532064

I cannot shorten this article without losing its reasonings

What the Stanley jury likely considered in rendering its not guilty verdict
Jury's decision has sparked accusations of racism and calls to change the system

By Mark Gollom, CBC News Posted: Feb 13, 2018 3:00 AM CT Last Updated: Feb 13, 2018 7:57 AM CT

Unlike in the U.S., where jurors are permitted to speak freely to the media after they've rendered a verdict, Canadian jurors are legally barred from discussing the proceedings.

This means it's unlikely the public will ever know the reasoning behind a Saskatchewan jury's decision to acquit Gerald Stanley, 56, of second-degree murder in the death of Colten Boushie.

The verdict has sparked accusations of racism and outrage that Stanley's defence team was able to exclude members of the Indigenous community as potential jurors.

It has also prompted legal questions about the case and the basis on which the jury of five men and seven women may have reached its verdict.
CBC News spoke to legal experts to explain some of the issues the jury may have taken into consideration.

Boushie, 22, was killed by a single gunshot to the back of his head after an altercation between Stanley, Boushie and four other young adults from the Red Pheasant Cree Nation on Aug. 9, 2016. They had driven an SUV onto Stanley's rural property near Biggar, an hour's drive west of Saskatoon.
Stanley testified he had fired warning shots and, as he approached the SUV, believed his gun was empty.

He said when he reached inside Boushie's SUV to turn it off, the gun went off accidentally, but that he never pulled the trigger.
Instead, his defence team argued the gun went off because of "hang fire" ? a delayed discharge that resulted from having pulled the trigger earlier.

The prosecution dismissed that theory as nonsense, arguing there was nothing wrong with the gun, and that Stanley had pulled the trigger to kill Boushie.
 
At the end of the trial, the jury was left with three choices: convict Stanley of second-degree murder, convict him of the lesser charge of manslaughter, or acquit.
"Any one of those three could be said to be reasonably supported by the evidence,
said Toronto-based criminal defence lawyer David Butt.

Credibility of Crown witnesses
Given that Boushie was shot in the head, as well as the fact Stanley arguably had a motive to use force, it wasn't unreasonable to suggest the killing was intentional, meaning second-degree murder was a viable charge, said Michael Plaxton, an associate professor at the University of Saskatchewan's College of Law.
However, he said some credibility issues with Crown witnesses likely made it harder to conclude beyond a reasonable doubt that the killing was intentional.

Cassidy Cross-Whitstone, 18, one of the SUV passengers, testified that he lied about trying to break into a truck on another property near the Stanley farm and about how much he'd had to drink that day.

Another SUV passenger, Belinda Jackson, 24, also changed her story, making no mention in a previous statement to police that Stanley had shot Boushie. But she later told jurors she saw the defendant shoot him twice in the head while he was sitting in the SUV.
"Speaking generally, if the people who are telling the story are not believable, or aspects of their version of events are not credible or inconsistent, then it becomes more difficult to convince the jury that's really what happened," said Steven Penney, a University of Alberta law professor.

What about manslaughter?
If the jury did not believe Stanley intended to kill Boushie, the option of convicting him of manslaughter was available. Put simply, manslaughter is a dangerous act that causes death, but without intent to kill.
Canada has an extremely broad manslaughter law, in particular when a person is using a firearm in a careless manner, said Kent Roach, a University of Toronto law professor. A manslaughter conviction follows, then, whenever a person who is using a firearm in a careless manner ought to have known that someone could be seriously injured from the way he or she was was using the firearm, Roach said.
"For me, one of the enduring mysteries ... is why did [the jury] reject manslaughter," he said.

Penney agreed that an argument could certainly be made for a manslaughter conviction based on the evidence that Stanley was grossly negligent by brandishing a weapon in a way that was very dangerous and resulted in the death of Boushie.

But he said there's also an argument to be made that Stanley did take precautions, that he did attempt to figure out if the weapon was loaded at the time of his confrontation with Boushie. If that's true, or if there's a reasonable doubt, that could make a manslaughter conviction challenging, Penney said.
"I'm not suggesting that was the correct way to view it ? but it's not crazy if that's the way the evidence was presented."

Hang fire and two options
Plaxton, in a series of tweets, argued that based on the lack of statistical evidence of ''hang fire," the reasonableness for the jury to accept this theory seemed "pretty thin."
And if the jurors rejected the hang fire theory, Plaxton wrote, this means they may have felt they had been left two options: either convict Stanley of second-degree murder, or acquit.

"Once left with the all-or-nothing choice, the jury was left to ask whether it was convinced beyond a reasonable doubt that, in the midst of all that chaos in a blindingly-quick period of time, Stanley intended to fire the fatal shot.
"We know what it decided."

Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on February 15, 2018, 04:28:45 PM
I am beginning to think that getting out of the city and moving to a rural and peaceful area in the country is a myth. RCMP response times are often very late, due to the distance they must cover in patrolling their district, as an example. Not to mention slow response times for ambulances to arrive.

Country folk are sitting ducks for crime.

A good example is Trevor Vader, in Alberta who made his living stealing vehicles, and anything that wasn't nailed down, along with his buddies in a rural area of Alberta.   He ended up murdering an elderly couple who were on their way to BC and was found guilty.




jb

I would so love to live in the country, on an acreage but I would not feel safe unless I had at least a 10 foot high heavy chain fence with a well locked gate, and several pit bull dogs within the property, plus a security system on the house. That is way too expensive a way to live comfortable. Rural people are sitting ducks for crime more so than in the city. 
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: jellybean on February 15, 2018, 04:51:09 PM
in the instance of Trevor, it looked like he would get off scott free, due to the judge making an error in his verbal statement in quoting the part of a criminal code that was no longer in effect.jb

However, it was eventually rectified, and justice was served.

jb



Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on February 15, 2018, 05:03:13 PM
This following is being passed around to all corners. Apparently written by a lawyer. ::) A very poorly informed lawyer. This what they are believing.
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: debbiec on February 15, 2018, 05:21:37 PM
Honestly, I have no words for what is happening surrounding this case. If the situation was reversed, what we are seeing here would likely not be happening. Then we would likely be hearing that the "trespasser" was shot in self defense after racial tensions made him fear for his own life.
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on February 15, 2018, 05:47:13 PM
The attitudes are absolutely mind boggling Debbie.

The White Privilege farmers worked, saved and bought the land with their own blood, sweat and tears. These people who feel they have a right to go and trespass on land to which a white man holds the title to, take it up with the government, because after all, they are the ones to always get the governments ears and actions.   
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on February 15, 2018, 08:15:37 PM
To be clear, I am not taking sides. I was shocked that Stanley didn't get at least a manslaughter conviction. We do not tolerate vigilante justice in this country; it's illegal. (Except I would turn a blind eye if SK's or SR's were done in without proper justice).
There were a lot of lies on both sides. Under oath Colten's friends admitted some of their lies and gave different stories, yet no one seems to believe them? That is the way it sounds. On social media it sounds as though the group were just out for a leisurely drive, had a flat and stopped at a few farms for help when being targeted with violence. Lies by omission. Whitewashing. Making it all about race. I have seen more hate against the whites than I have against the indigenous people.
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: jellybean on February 15, 2018, 08:22:27 PM
http://www.vancourier.com/opinion/opinion-there-is-so-much-wrong-being-said-by-both-sides-about-the-gerald-stanley-trial-1.23174002

The above article dispells myths about the trial. It hits the nail right on the head.
about this whole mess. 

Snipped

Much has been made of the all-white jury. But the calling of 750 potential jurors of a jury pool is extraordinary. That was a deliberate attempt by the court to provide as wide a jury pool as possible, and certainly larger than anything I encountered. That just a sliver of those potential jurors showed up is a reflection that many people, including First Nations people, did not wish to put in an effort for this case. Perhaps if all, or even most, of those 750 Much has been made of the all-white jury. But the calling of 750 potential jurors of a jury pool is extraordinary. That was a deliberate attempt by the court to provide as wide a jury pool as possible, and certainly larger than anything I encountered. That just a sliver of those potential jurors showed up is a reflection that many people, including First Nations people, did not wish to put in an effort for this case. Perhaps if all, or even most, of those 750 people showed up, given the local demographics and substantial Indigenous population, it would have been impossible for the defence to challenge them all people of visible minorities. There would have been too many.

Many, many people have said this case justified people defending their property. Some people seem to think it happened in the middle of the night ? it didn?t. It was late afternoon. The defense did not claim a defence of property, nor did it claim self-defence on behalf of Gerald Stanley. They claimed it was an accident, and the jury ? 12 people, who heard all the evidence ? believed it.

The defence of accident was significantly based on the presence of a bulged shell casing found on the dashboard of the SUV. That part has been frequently left out in the coverage and commentary.

A great many people think the five in the Ford Escape were just looking for help with a tire, yet that is not what their own testimony reflected. They did not testify they walked up to the house to ask for help, or to the people working on the fence. Rather, they testified they had been ?checking? vehicles, on another farm before coming to the Stanley farm. They testified to trying to start a quad. That is not asking for help, nor asking for a floor jack.
Many people have said those in the vehicle were unarmed. That is false. They drove into that yard with a loaded .22 rifle, albeit damaged from their attempt to break into a vehicle in a nearby farm just before. The SUV had live rounds and spent .22 casings in it, as they had been shooting that day.

From my experience as a court reporter, there could have been a slew of charges on both sides. Gerald Stanley could have been charged with various firearms charges regarding storage and careless usage, for instance, charges that may have stuck if they had been included in the trial. The occupants of the SUV could have been charged with similar firearms charges from their attendance at both farms. There could have been charged with similar firearms charges from their attendance at both farms. There could have been impaired driving charges as well, given their various (and often contradictory) testimony implied different drivers. They also could have been charged with armed robbery, use of a firearm in commission of an indictable offence, attemptedattempted theft and mischief charges. Possibly perjury, too. For whatever reason, we didn?t see that.

Gerald Stanley was found ?not guilty? of second degree murder and manslaughter. That is not ?innocent.? There is a distinction.

Emotions are high and tempers are flaring. There has been an enormous amount of racism, and a great deal of outright fallacies, expressed by ?supporters? on both sides of this case. The whole affair has greatly set back relations between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people of Saskatchewan.
How we come back from that, I don?t know.
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on February 16, 2018, 12:57:49 AM
Wow! Interesting indeed. Don't show up for selection and then make a big stink afterwards regarding NO indigenous people on the jury!

Quote
Much has been made of the all-white jury. But the calling of 750 potential jurors of a jury pool is extraordinary. That was a deliberate attempt by the court to provide as wide a jury pool as possible, and certainly larger than anything I encountered. That just a sliver of those potential jurors showed up is a reflection that many people, including First Nations people, did not wish to put in an effort for this case. Perhaps if all, or even most, of those 750 people showed up, given the local demographics and substantial Indigenous population, it would have been impossible for the defence to challenge them all people of visible minorities. There would have been too many.
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: jellybean on February 16, 2018, 02:01:37 AM
From what I have read 5 showed up but were challenged.  Others did not have a way to get there and needed to be sequesterd, due to lack of transportation.

They have an answer for everything, it seems.

jb



Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on February 16, 2018, 02:13:56 AM
From what I have read 5 showed up but were challenged.  Others did not have a way to get there and needed to be sequesterd, due to lack of transportation.

jb

I am sorry if they did not have transportation, but then why blame it on the justice system?
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: jellybean on February 16, 2018, 02:25:17 AM
Quote
I am sorry if they did not have transportation, but then why blame it on the justice system?

Exactly! 
Something could have been arranged, but at least they could have made an
attempt to show up the first time, and if chosen, work it out with the system for transportation. Fair to say, not all whites showed up either. Seems few really  wanted to get involved in that trial. Out of 750 requests to attend for jury selection,  only 200 people showed up. 

jb



Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on February 16, 2018, 02:59:55 AM
I know that probably many lived on the RP reserve and may not have had their own transportation, and sadly that probably is the same for taking on a job where a vehicle is required. That is something that could be looked into for the future. Relatives or friends living in the town/city could put 'out of towners' up for a period.
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on February 16, 2018, 01:18:55 PM
Just for the record, perusing around, I did find a comment by a FN person that did sound very much like a death threat against Mr. Stanley and when I went back to find it, the comment was gone. Two wrongs don't make a right. Violence is violence no matter who/which side does it.
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: debbiec on February 16, 2018, 01:33:47 PM
I'm not sure who has that page, but perhaps the comment was removed by Admin (as it should have been).

I'm sure in the past there have been court cases that did not have the ending that everyone involved, wanted. I wonder if the people who felt the verdict handed down by a jury, was not just, had visited Ottawa, would they have gotten this much attention in regard changing the way a jury is selected? 
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on February 16, 2018, 02:32:17 PM
I'm not sure who has that page, but perhaps the comment was removed by Admin (as it should have been).

I'm sure in the past there have been court cases that did not have the ending that everyone involved, wanted. I wonder if the people who felt the verdict handed down by a jury, was not just, had visited Ottawa, would they have gotten this much attention in regard changing the way a jury is selected?

Debbie the comment was on a personal FB page, so probably the page owner or the writer removed it. Police may be monitoring some FB pages. The author of the threat was quite distant (in mileage) so that is why I didn't take a copy of it at the time I saw it.

In regard visiting Ottawa, no I don't think so.
Jody Wilson-Raybould, PM Trudeau and the whole lot of people looking into this fracus also need to dig deeper, especially considering the huge leeway Justice Popescul gave in regards to the amount of people called for jury selection, the small showing, and why. There was, imo, very much equal opportunity for fair indigenous people's representation on the jury, had they taken advantage of it. I guess many people must have known or felt that the young men and women were in the wrong to begin with in every move they made that day. 
I sent that link to Rosemary Barton CBC so she could delve into as that is what she does ... get to the bottom. So if she thinks it is worthwhile, hopefully she does. The truth needs to be out there.

Where there is smoke there is usually fire. Downplaying a severe concern and distracting from truths with a militant stance somewhere else, is not going to solve the problems in that area.
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: jellybean on February 17, 2018, 02:11:53 PM
https://saskatoon.ctvnews.ca/i-was-stupid-crown-witness-says-he-lied-about-events-leading-up-to-boushie-shooting-1.3784627

A Crown witness in the trial of a Saskatchewan farmer charged with shooting an Indigenous man on his property said he lied to police and the Crown about carrying a gun and attempting to break into a truck on the day his friend was killed.
Cassidy Cross admitted, under cross-examination, he changed his story one day before taking the witness stand Thursday. The 18-year-old was testifying on day three of evidence at the second-degree murder trial of Gerald Stanley.

?After the trial started you thought it good to take the Crown and the police officer aside and say, ?Actually, we did have a gun. It was my gun. We were stealing. We used the gun to try and break into a vehicle??" defence lawyer Scott Spencer asked. "So that's all stuff you told the police last night after court?"

Cross was driving an SUV carrying four friends that entered Stanley's farm on Aug. 9, 2016.
Stanley, 56, has pleaded not guilty to second-degree murder after another man in that vehicle, 22-year-old Colten Boushie, was shot in the back of the head.
Cross testified he had about 30 shots of alcohol and was drunk on the day of the shooting.

Court has already heard that, at around the same time of the shooting, RCMP received a report about a suspected theft from a truck at a farm about 15 to 20 kilometres from the Stanley property. A grey SUV with a flat tire, matching the one Cross was driving, was spotted at that scene and police found the broken stock of a gun.

Cross initially told investigators he and his four friends in the SUV were just checking out the truck, but on the stand, he admitted he and another man, Eric Meechance, were trying to steal and that they had used the gun to attempt to break in.
"I lied about me going into that truck," he testified. "My intentions were to go steal."

The SUV then rolled up to the Stanley farm, but Cross said the group was simply looking for help with the tire.
"I wasn't there to steal," he told court.

Stanley's son, Sheldon, has testified he and his dad heard an ATV start and thought it was being stolen. The pair ran toward the SUV and Sheldon said he hit the windshield with a hammer as the driver tried to leave the farm.

Cross was driving an SUV carrying four friends that entered Stanley's farm on Aug. 9, 2016.
Stanley, 56, has pleaded not guilty to second-degree murder after another man in that vehicle, 22-year-old Colten Boushie, was shot in the back of the head.
Cross testified he had about 30 shots of alcohol and was drunk on the day of the shooting.
Court has already heard that, at around the same time of the shooting, RCMP received a report about a suspected theft from a truck at a farm about 15 to 20 kilometres from the Stanley property. A grey SUV with a flat tire, matching the one Cross was driving, was spotted at that scene and police found the broken stock of a gun.

Cross initially told investigators he and his four friends in the SUV were just checking out the truck, but on the stand, he admitted he and another man, Eric Meechance, were trying to steal and that they had used the gun to attempt to break in.
"I lied about me going into that truck," he testified. "My intentions were to go steal."
The SUV then rolled up to the Stanley farm, but Cross said the group was simply looking for help with the tire.
"I wasn't there to steal," he told court.
Stanley's son, Sheldon, has testified he and his dad heard an ATV start and thought it was being stolen. The pair ran toward the SUV and Sheldon said he hit the windshield with a hammer as the driver tried to leave the farm.

Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: capeheart on February 17, 2018, 02:51:23 PM
Sap1, I feel in this instance they just made and magnified the fact that it was a native that was killed and not just say a "man" was killed when a farmer tried to protect his property. That is the whole problem, the US deals with the same words related to any crimes that are committed. Not once did the family acknowledge the fact that Colten was in a place and involved in activity that he should not have been. People know the truth, they are not stupid. They know in the area the farmers have been dealing with the problem of thefts for quite some time. So eventually it was going to happen, either a farmer or the intruder was going to end up losing, either their life are being injured.  We see it all the time lately, "home invasions", they are called down here. The Maritimes have had serious crimes committed against innocent individuals of people looking for money and they were  beaten people to death in their own homes.  So I have a very best friend that lives in a small village about 30 miles from me and they are kind of at the end of the vilage and not many houses and it is a through road that goes to another area of Cape Breton. They have a big sign on their lawn, a picture of a big gun and a message "WE DON'T CALL 9-11'.  Now her husband is not a violent man, he may have a gun, I never saw it ever, but he possibly has a rifle.  So he has a warning on the lawn, in other words, don't tangle with me.  So owners of the property should have a sign "ABSOLUTELY NO TRESPASSING.'  I feel that the natives blame everyone else, they do not take ownership of any wrongs, it is always somebody else's fault. And it is not mainly the person who did them wrong as such, but they clump everyone in the same group.  I hope that they get the help they need and let this settle down and people get back to normal and respect one another's property. 
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on February 17, 2018, 09:51:22 PM
iTA Capeheart.

When I read what these 20 something men have to say, I feel there is no hope of ever having reconciliation work. I am so tired of all the BS already.
There are many FN people who are great and did great things and then there are the small but loud activists who will not be accountable for their own actions. It seems to me a blind eye is turned when they began drinking and driving and getting into trouble with the law and then hate all cops and justice and their parents are right behind them supporting all the way.

The following is what they are thinking and propagating:

Quote
Cassidy Cross
22 hrs ?
It?s fucked up how indigenous people were once slaves of the Caucasians and how they trained us to be racist against ourselves and the places we were raised in. you kept us caged in, destroyed our culture and said you civilized us, raped our women, and when we were born you despised us.
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: jellybean on February 17, 2018, 10:10:32 PM
I had to catch my breath when I read Cross.  His feelings about us  is heartbreaking.

 I have witnessed discrimination of them in my life.

We live in a bubble if we have not witnessed it.

However, the words of Mr. Cross alarms me.

I have the following message for Mr. Cassidy Cross.
 
"No good can come of you, Mr. Cross when your heart is so full of hatred of us"
It eats away at a person, and creates a shadow of oneself. By your very attitude, you have placed yourself in your own personal cage. We all have hardships to face, and to overcome.  You are not alone in that.

 Opportunity comes to all of us, regardless of our skin colour.  Get and stay sober, less you can't see it when it does come. Opportunity for positive change often comes in small ways.   Work hard Cassidy, for changes and improvements on your reserve first. You would be surprised as to the satisfaction that you receive when you can see change due to your positive efforts. As it goes for all of us,  change  begins at home.

Youth can make a difference for the good.  Be part of it, not apart from it.

Get after the chief to seriously go to bat for his people and create change on your reserve.

What kind of a role model is he ?

If he is so wrapped up in himself, his salary etc. have him voted out.

 You know something Cassidy? I am tired of my people being blamed for every single shortfall of your people.

Lets see some initiative in cleaning up your own home front first, before you start criticizing us, and then we can better appreciate one another.
jb


 
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on February 18, 2018, 01:42:02 AM
This is happening at the hands of their own administration.

http://thestarphoenix.com/news/local-news/appeal-of-red-pheasant-band-election-still-before-the-courts-more-than-a-year-later

This is right across Canada. Yet all the ills are our fault for some reason. Those voted into power have no idea of governance. Really very sad situations. Not a wonder the young people are totally "lost" by the time they reach early 20's.
Bringing this up is not racist; it's a fact of life.

http://www.nationalpost.com/news/canada/rethinkingthereserve/week+problems+governance/280526/story.html

Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: jellybean on February 18, 2018, 02:37:16 AM
quote sap

This is right across Canada. Yet all the ills are our fault for some reason. Those voted into power have no idea of governance. Really very sad situations. Not a wonder the young people are totally "lost" by the time they reach early 20's.
Bringing this up is not racist; it's a fact of life.

******************************************
Sadly, very true\
jb


Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on February 18, 2018, 03:38:21 AM
This Grand Chief is originally from Red Pheasant reserve, but now he is also under fire from his own people. The link will tell you why.

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2018/02/12/robert-falcon-ouellettes-remarks-on-gerald-stanley-are-reckless-grand-chief_a_23359774/?ncid=fcbklnkcahpmg00000001

Comments made by a federal MP about Gerald Stanley's acquittal are "reckless" and could lead to more violence, a Manitoba grand chief said Monday.

Liberal MP Robert-Falcon Ouellette told the Winnipeg Free Press that he felt sorry for both the Boushie and Stanley families.

"I'm really sorry for the Boushie family. But I'm also sorry for the Stanley family ... The Stanley family, and many farmers in Saskatchewan, have the feeling that their property is not respected and people come on to their farms and steal their stuff," the Winnipeg Centre MP said. "They've essentially lost two years of their lives. They've faced legal bills and great difficulty."

He said that Saskatchewan is "a lawless state in some ways," because the RCMP doesn't respond to theft quickly enough.

Gerald Stanley was found not guilty of second-degree murder by a jury in Battleford, Sask. on Friday.
A jury found Stanley not guilty of second-degree murder on Friday. He was accused of shooting Colten Boushie, 22, in the head after an SUV drove onto Stanley's farm near Biggar, Sask. Stanley's lawyer argued that the fatal shot was an accident.

Ouellette hails from Red Pheasant First Nation, the same Cree nation that counted Boushie as a member.

The Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs slammed Ouellette's comments on social media.

"Two years doesn't compare to the entire life that Colten Boushie lost in 2016," the Assembly wrote.

Our teachings speak to the sacredness of human life and these comments fly in the face of what our ancestors have been teaching us since time immemorial.
Grand Chief Arlen Dumas
"How is it even possible for an elected representative of the Government of Canada, who ran as an Indigenous candidate, defend the taking of a human life in order to defend property and 'stuff'?" asked Grand Chief Arlen Dumas. "Our teachings speak to the sacredness of human life and these comments fly in the face of what our ancestors have been teaching us since time immemorial."

"For a prominent Indigenous MP to support the right of an individual to defend their property in this same manner is reckless and dangerous, and could result in an increase in violent confrontation and the deaths of more innocent people ... No property is more valuable than a human life and the AMC stands and fully supports the Boushie family in their quest to change the way First Nations people are treated in the criminal justice system."


FRED CHARTRAND/CANADIAN PRESS
Grand Chief Arlen Dumas speaks during a signing ceremony to improve child and family services in Manitoba First Nations communities in Ottawa on Dec. 7, 2017.
Neither Ouellette nor the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs immediately responded to requests for comment.

The MP made similar comments in an interview with CBC News on Saturday.

He called Boushie's death "an abject failure of our society."

Farmers in Saskatchewan feel that they have to protect their property on their own, he said. He also said that it was disappointing to hear that the jury for Stanley's trial didn't reflect the province's population.

Boushie's cousin, Jade Tootoosis, previously said that defence lawyers rejected all visibly Indigenous people during jury selection.

Sixteen per cent of Saskatchewan's population identifies as Aboriginal, according to Statistics Canada.

Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on February 18, 2018, 04:01:31 AM
The five who were drinking that Sunday, among other things, were all descendants from Chiefs who had been through the justice system for driving impaired, thefts, corruption, etc. Some did jail time. The present Chief, also related to some of these adults is presently in the system awaiting trials. There is much info on the Net. Seems to me, these leaders failed to ingrain traditional values.
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: jellybean on February 18, 2018, 01:01:26 PM
{No need to keep saying that you are not racist sap.  Because You are NOT!! You always try to give everyone a "fair shake"}

Quote
Seems to me, these leaders failed to ingrain traditional values.

Bringing up their traditional values and customs, is always used by some of them, when it suits them, and it gives a readily available cover for their own failures.

How can some of them even speak of values, when some chiefs steal from their own people, and break other laws, thus serving jail time? A Chief should represent the best of the people that he serves. He or she should be a problem solver, not a problem to be solved.

Farmers with Firearms is a fb page, and the comments are enlightening.  Many of them have had thefts on their property.  One poster said that the Stanley family has had death threats, and have had to hire security guards. 

He may still face a retrial.  Another poster said that the Stanley's have worked hard all of their lives for their farm, and now this. They have lost their harvest, etc, etc.

Some criticize their own Aboriginal MP's if they do not agree with them. Sad.

By way of google, I was aware of the RP's chief's bad boy behaviour.  He has no shame.

The National POst article exposes the corruption on reserves, and the amount of money pouring into the reserves is astonishing....  Yet they would have us believe that we do not give them enough.  The chiefs who can stand by and see their people living in terrible conditions, and spending the money on themselves and family, have no shame.

The Fed's should overhaul Indian Affairs, and all of their programs going to our natives.
However, the Feds now have the  thought of paying each native directly, and to let them manage their own money - If so, then they should insist that every household on those reserves attend classes to learn money managment.  Whatever the Feds decide, Professional Oversight on reserve monies spent,should be implemented on bad reserves immediately.  Canadian's should insist on it! 

Discouraging and discusting state of affairs,  Thank you National Post for your research and well written article.  .....I hope many Canadians read it.


jb

Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: jellybean on February 18, 2018, 05:02:11 PM
Very familiar names appear here. Different areas, different people.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatchewan/six-men-charged-red-pheasant-hunting-1.3799959

snipped

Six men have been charged with illegal hunting and outfitting after a year-long investigation near North Battleford, Sask.

Officials with the province's environment ministry say undercover officers from the United States booked hunts with an outfitting business called Rezz Raxx ? based on the Red Pheasant First Nation. The investigation was started in response to concerns about increased illegal hunting practices in the area
The undercover operation resulted in a slew of charges against the six men, from illegal outfitting to use of a search light.


Lawrence Lee Meechance, 39, was fined $17,900 for outfitting without a licence, aiding and abetting unlawful hunting near North Battleford, falsifying an export permit application and driving without a driver's licence.

Robin D. Wuttunee, 38, was fined $12,510 for unlawful hunting near Landis, use of a search light for hunting, unlawful hunting and hunting on posted land near Kindersley, guiding without a licence and driving without a driver's licence.

Tyrone Adam Cuthand, 32, was fined $10,470 for guiding without a licence near Battleford, unlawful hunting near Sonningdale, using a search light for hunting near Maymont, driving without a driver's licence and falsifying an export permit application.

Dennis Kennedy, 27, was fined $3,150 for aiding and abetting, carrying a loaded firearm in a vehicle, guiding without a licence near Battleford, hunting on posted land near Landis, unlawful hunting near Ruthilda and driving without a driver's licence.

Stephen A.D. Armstrong, 28, was fined $10,000 for unlawfully hunting and hunting on posted land near Kindersley, unlawful hunting near Golden Prairie, using a search light for hunting near Gull Lake and guiding without a licence near Battleford.

Gregg John Shawn Meechance, 28, was fined $1,120 for falsifying an export permit application.
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: jellybean on February 18, 2018, 06:56:41 PM
https://globalnews.ca/news/1925403/saskatchewan-men-fined-for-hunting-elk-unlawfully/

more private property offenses.  Same names

NORTH BATTLEFORD, Sask. ? An elk shot on private property in Saskatchewan has resulted in $5,880 in fines for three men. The men were charged for unlawfully hunting near Biggar in October 2013.

The charges stem from a call to a Saskatchewan Ministry of Environment field office. Conservation officers investigated the complaint and found the men at the scene with the animal.
Lawrence Lee Meechance, Neal Meechance and Gerald Meechance of Red Pheasant First Nation were each fined $1,960 in North Battleford provincial court last month.


Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on February 18, 2018, 08:39:50 PM
Before the Gerald Stanley incident: Again the same names, Wuttunee and Meechance

(According to Meechance FB page, he was discharged from jail in Sept 2016 so he wasn't in the car with the crew that vandalized the countryside)

http://thestarphoenix.com/news/crime/men-await-sentencing-for-night-of-theft-and-violence-including-robbing-two-women-who-stopped-to-help-them

Two men with roots in North Battleford and the Red Pheasant First Nation are expected to be sentenced Thursday after entering last-minute guilty pleas to charges stemming from what Crown prosecutor Tamara Rock called ?a night of theft and violence? in late 2015.

Rocky Meechance, 22, and Cody Wuttunee, 21, pleaded guilty to the charges ? which include breaking and entering and using a stolen .22-calibre rifle to steal a car ? hours after their trial was scheduled to start in Saskatoon provincial court.

Judge Brent Klause reserved his decision after Rock and defence attorney Mike Buchinski made a joint submission asking him to sentence Meechance to six years in prison with credit for 18 months on remand and order Wuttunee to serve four years with credit for 38 days on remand.

Wuttunee, Meechance and four youths decided to rob two women who stopped to offer help after seeing the group?s vehicle in a ditch around 3 a.m. on Dec. 19, 2015.

?It doesn?t get much worse than that,? Klause said.

The group?s crimes began hours earlier when they left North Battleford in a stolen vehicle and spent the late evening and early morning stealing from acreages and confronting one property owner in the Clavet area, court heard.


After crashing and stealing a car from the women who stopped to help them ? one of the women later said she pleaded for her life when one of the group pointed a rifle at her ? they led police on a high-speed chase through Saskatoon to North Battleford, court heard.

?There was a resolution that worked for all parties and ? the accused believed they were better positioned to enter guilty pleas,? Buchinski said of the plea deal, noting neither man had an extensive criminal record at the time of the offences.

Rock said the pleas could have been a result of the Crown?s readiness to proceed with a trial, but noted the admissions of guilt are a great relief for all of the victims, especially the two women who were assaulted on the side of the highway, because they no longer have to testify in court.

Both lawyers said they expect Klause to accept the joint submission.

Meechance and Wuttunee spent the hearing sitting quietly in the prisoner?s box, staring at the floor. Both declined to make statements, but a woman identifying herself as Meechance?s sister urged Klause to be lenient with his sentence.

?I believe in second chances,? she said from the back of the courtroom, tears streaming down her face. ?I do believe this is what these boys need.?

amacpherson@postmedia.com
twitter.com/macphersona

Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: jellybean on February 18, 2018, 08:57:44 PM
Glad this is coming out sap.  Sad that Colten even ran around with them. He would be alive today had he not gone anywhere with them.  They are bad news,

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatchewan/colten-boushie-investigation-rcmp-1.4383816
RCMP clears itself of misconduct in Colten Boushie investigation
Family lawyer vows to appeal, says Mounties were wrong to surround family home
By Charles Hamilton, CBC News Posted: Nov 02, 2017 9:53 AM CT Last Updated: Nov 02, 2017 8:03

snipped

But when seven officers went to Red Pheasant First Nation to inform his mother and siblings of his death, they surrounded and searched the family's trailer.
They were acting on a tip that a possibly armed man had fled the scene of Boushie's death to a trailer looking like that of his family, according to the RCMP.

In an Oct. 19 letter to the family, RCMP Supt. Mike Gibbs apologized for the officers' actions, conceding they "could have been perceived as insensitive." 
But, he went on, "given the safety risks involved," the approach "the RCMP had to take was tactical in nature and in this situation was acceptable."



 

Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on February 18, 2018, 09:11:10 PM
One familiar name in this incident from mid 90's. Murder of two farmers. Can't find any news articles, however a person known to them replied on a FB page that they served 19 years and the other 13 years, respectively. Nice to know it wasn't just 18 months.

https://www.producer.com/1994/11/murder-suspects-in-court/

SASKATOON (Staff) ? One of two men charged in the double slaying at a farmhouse in northwest Saskatchewan was scheduled to appear in a North Battleford court this week.

Colin Leonard Baptist, 23, was expected to appear in provincial court Nov. 2 at 9 a.m. Details of his appearance were not available at press time.

The other suspect, Ron Francis Coldwell, 22, is slated to appear in North Battleford provincial court Nov. 14.


Each is charged with two counts of first degree murder after two men were found shot to death in a farmhouse near Cando.


Dead are Gordon Tetarenko of Cando and Bryan Kipp of North Battleford.

RCMP reported they have the murder weapon, and said Tetarenko and Kipp died instantly from rifle shots. They were found in separate bedrooms of Tetarenko?s house. The pair were both bachelors and Kipp was visiting the small town.

The crimes were discovered on Oct. 16 when a relative of Tetarenko saw the dog lying dead in the yard.
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: jellybean on February 18, 2018, 09:14:22 PM
Oh my god, in cold blood = no less.

No wonder farmers are jittery.

jb
ps  I cannot locate anything as to their sentencing or trial.   Was it blacked out from the press?
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on February 18, 2018, 09:24:11 PM
Yep, I am seeing the light at the end of the tunnel now. This makes a huge difference how my next political vote will be for sure.
CBC does not want to post both sides of the coin here either.

I would never ever feel safe driving across Sask and Manitoba. Several years ago Sask was beckoning to Albertans and others to come buy property there for cheap. I knew several medical people took advantage of the situation. To be honest, I think I would rather be living in the mid east.
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: jellybean on February 18, 2018, 10:01:26 PM
CBC is disappointing.  They are following Trudeau's mindset.  After all, they are paid by tax payers.
They know which side their bread is buttered on.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatoon/gerald-stanley-court-charges-improperly-stored-guns-1.4538790

The legal troubles of Gerald Stanley, the Saskatchewan farmer acquitted in the shooting death of Colten Boushie, are slated to carry over into provincial court next month.
Stanley, 56, still faces two charges of improperly storing firearms on his Biggar, Sask.-area farm where Boushie was killed.
jb
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on February 18, 2018, 11:07:47 PM
Yet no charges for the 4 individuals for their part in the whole scene. Their broken and loaded rifle was sitting loose in the car being driven by a drunk person.

CBC is covered 80% by taxpayers and 20% from advertising. Andrew Scheer said he would get rid of CBC. Well they are doing a good job on the winter games though.

I contacted Rosemary Barton regarding the other side of the coin but have heard nothing and likely never will so I will contact her again and apologize for sending info that does not sit well with biased reporting. 

Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on February 19, 2018, 12:02:55 AM
Sort of good news, if it works.

https://regina.ctvnews.ca/new-team-to-fight-crime-in-rural-saskatchewan-1.3556453



The province has announced the creation of a new Protection and Response Team to help fight crime in rural Saskatchewan.

The team will consist of 258 armed officers with arrest and detention powers, including:

120 police officers from RCMP and municipal police services
60 police positions currently deployed to the Combined Traffic Services Saskatchewan Initiative
30 new police positions and 30 repurposed police positions currently funded by the Ministry of Justice

In addition, 40 highway commercial vehicle enforcement officers will be armed and, along with conservation officers who already carry guns, will be able to respond to calls and make arrests.


That means conservation officers could be called to break and enters if they were closer to the scene than the RCMP.

"They also deal with people that have firearms, more often than not, and have very similar training," said Dale McPhee, deputy minister of Corrections and policing.

"What we're trying to do is, we're going to sit down and make sure that standard response training is the same so we can get a first car there. Police officers ... actually don't necessarily run into those environments, what they do is they assess the situation based on their training, just as (conservation officers) would taking a firearms call with somebody in the bush."

According to a government news release, all team members will receive a comprehensive training curriculum, which will be provided to all officers regardless of their designations. The team expands on the successes of blended policing models to:

Improve police response to emergency calls for services, including property crimes that are in progress
Enhance uniform visibility and presence in rural Saskatchewan
Increase the enforcement of drug trafficking on Saskatchewan?s roadways
 Enhance the safety of Saskatchewan roads by reducing the number of serious collisions and fatalities
The team is being created in response to recommendations by the Caucus Committee on Crime.

People around Saskatchewan were voicing concerns after a story emerged last September that three masked suspects armed with handguns allegedly approached a farmhand in west-central Saskatchewan.

Shortly after, there were media reports of farmers carrying firearms during harvest. RCMP then urged people not to take the law into their own hands.

The committee's report, which was also released Tuesday, said there were concerns about police in every region of the province.

"Citizens did not feel as if the RCMP were visible enough in their community to deter crime and that, in some cases, their slow response times allowed the criminal to get away," the report stated.

The report said rural residents are responding to growing crimes rates "by defending themselves in any way they feel necessary."

"This has led to rural residents carrying firearms in some cases, using their vehicles to push perpetrator's vehicles out of their yards, and have led to an increase in tensions between rural residents, surrounding First Nations, and police," it stated.

Justice Minister Gordon Wyant said the government would help people crime-proof their properties, perhaps through technology such as cameras.

Rebuilding a rural crime watch program would help too, he said.

"It was a while ago, you know, farms were a lot smaller than they are today and neighbours could keep an eye on their neighbours, and that's not the case anymore. Farms are much larger and neighbours don't have an opportunity to do that," said Wyant.

"So, what solutions can be brought to that, how can we enable the revitalization of a crime-watch program in areas and municipalities that want that?"

Ray Orb, president of the Saskatchewan Association of Rural Municipalities, said the measures announced Tuesday were a beginning.

"We wanted, for sure, to have more RCMP officers on the ground. We wanted to have a greater visibility of officers in the province in the rural areas," Orb said after the announcement.

"So I think what we've been promised today, we're not necessarily getting more officers, but we're getting more visibility. We're getting shorter response times, which I think is something that we really need in rural Saskatchewan."

Drug and alcohol use were cited as factors contributing to the growing crime rates. For example, Regina police told the committee that incidences of crystal meth increased 1,325 per cent from 2012 to 2016.

The committee also heard concerns that the federal Youth Criminal Justice Act was not stopping youth from committing crimes.

"In some cases, family, friends, and gangs were encouraging youth to commit crimes on their behalf because they knew that the youth would not suffer as severe repercussions if caught," said the report.

Wyant said Saskatchewan will request a review of the act with the aim of increased consequences for young offenders and adults who enable young people to commit crimes, and for greater rehabilitation.

Saskatchewan will also push for a western Canada Aboriginal gang strategy when justice ministers from across Canada meet next month, he said.

With files from The Canadian Press
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: jellybean on February 19, 2018, 12:48:33 AM
sap
Quote
I contacted Rosemary Barton regarding the other side of the coin but have heard nothing and likely never will so I will contact her again and apologize for sending info that does not sit well with biased reporting.
.  LOL

I have noted their change in format and presentation.  Trying to jazz it up, I see' although it is  - pretty hard to jazz up boring Canadian news zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz, but this reminds me how lucky we are. Boring news is very often good news in these troubled times.

I certainly have noticed that CBC have become biased in what and how they present the news, as of late. 

jb
 
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on February 21, 2018, 02:58:00 PM
On the other hand .....

White on Indigenous crimes in Saskatchewan. (Excerpts from long article.) I'm sorry, so much is relevant imo and I could not cut all that much. Please take the time to read at the link though. The author wrote this after the latest shooting.

http://leaderpost.com/news/crime/court-of-contention-a-look-back-at-crimes-that-divided-a-province

Hundreds of cases pass through Saskatchewan?s courts every day without commentary and with few observers. Then there?s a crime or trial that divides along lines of race and class, of advantage and marginalization, and tensions that simmer softly for years below the surface boil and erupt.

They spark protests, rallies, vigils, petitions and demands for inquiries. They ignite debate on the Internet, call-in shows, letters to the editor, and on the courthouse steps, fuelling local and national newscasts and headlines, academic studies, documentaries and books.

University of Regina professor James McNinch spoke of one such case at a public lecture in 2007.

?It was like I was seeing my home province in a new way,? he told the gathering. ?It seemed like the face of Saskatchewan was being revealed in a new way, because we have such a homesteader, howdy, Roughrider kind of image.

?And yet this was sort of the dark side coming out,? he said.

The case on which McNinch focused began in 2001 with a then 12-year-old girl in small-town Saskatchewan. Eight years later, she was a young woman standing with supporters, pressing for an inquiry, in front of the Saskatchewan Legislative Building. ?This isn?t easy for me but I believe in the importance for myself and for other First Nation children,? she told reporters.

(There were many supporters at the Legislative Building that day, but where were they when the 12 year old ran away?)Sap1

The girl, whose name is protected by a court-ordered publication ban, was the victim in a sexual assault case that unfolded and unravelled in the Saskatchewan courts for seven gruelling years, through four separate trials and three different appeals that, as on that day in 2009, often spawned rallies and controversy at each step.

Three white men from the Tisdale area met the 12-year-old, who had run away from home that night, as she sat on the steps of a bar in Chelan in September 2001. Testifying a half-dozen times, she accused the trio of getting her drunk and taking advantage of her sexually on a country road after she accepted a ride home. In a case that hinged on issues of consent, the girl agreed she had lied about her age ? then the legal age of consent was 14 ? but denied she was a willing participant in any sexual activity. After all the trials and appeals that reached up to the Supreme Court, only Dean Trevor Edmondson was convicted, receiving a house arrest sentence that further enflamed emotions. ?Race relations are taking a beating ?  Saskatchewan gets another black eye and redneck image,? wrote Indigenous columnist Doug Cuthand at the time.

(That is so wrong imo. These men got a slap on the wrist for a crime on a child!! I can understand the outrage of the victim's people. But I continue to ask, why was a 12 year old running away from home and sitting on the steps of an alcohol drinking establishment?) Sap1


A July 2003 rally outside the Court of Queens Bench in Melfort regarding a sexual assault on a 12-year-old Indigenous girl. GABRIEL HENNINGS / SASKATOON STARPHOENIX

Just two months before the girl and the men crossed paths, an acquittal in a different case prompted a grieving mother to tell a Regina news conference she felt as though, ?It sets a precedent for a Caucasian person to come in ? and kill an aboriginal. And it?s OK.?

(Details are fuzzy, but reading the whole article, this does seem to be a huge problem.)Sap1


An altercation that began with some smashed vehicle windows on March 19, 2000 at a resort near Carlyle escalated to a group of partygoers confronting the two vandals. One witness heard racial slurs shouted by a group of white men as they charged up a hill toward the victim and his cousin. William Kakakaway, a 22-year-old member of the White Bear First Nation, died when he was hit in the head with a tire iron, hurled from some four to six metres away. The man who had thrown it said he was defending himself from an assailant brandishing a bat. The jury at the trial in Estevan acquitted him of murder. While a band councillor denounced a ?racist climate? in the area, the man?s lawyer denied race played any role in the confrontation but agreed it did in the fallout immediately after the death. As tensions rose, a white teen threatened Kakakaway?s family, an Indigenous man vandalized police vehicles, and threatening posters appeared in the area.

(Shocking at best) Sap1

Several years earlier, what McNinch called the ?dark side? of this province was sharply brought into focus by the image of an angry Carney Nerland, sporting a brown shirt with a swastika-emblazoned armband as he pointed a gun and spewed about ?native birth control.? The pictures of Nerland, a member of the Saskatchewan branch of an Aryan Nation group, were captured as he attended a neo-Nazi gathering in Alberta, four months before he killed Leo LaChance in Prince Albert.

(I had not even heard of this before! More than shocking! Have people not learned from the WW2??!!) Sap1

On Jan. 28, 1991, Nerland was drinking with two friends, who worked in provincial corrections, inside the pawn shop he owned when LaChance, a 43-year-old trapper from the Big River First Nations, entered. Nerland fired an assault rifle twice into the floor, then, after LaChance exited, fired again through the shop door. The Cree man, who was on the other side of that door, was hit in the back. As he lay dying,  LaChance told an officer who arrived on scene that there?d been no argument, and the victim surmised the shooting must have been an accident.
Nerland ? who while awaiting his day in court said he deserved a medal and had ?done you all a favour? for killing the First Nations man ? pleaded guilty as charged to manslaughter and received a four-year prison sentence. The Crown said there was insufficient evidence to prove an intention to kill, necessary for a murder charge. But many Indigenous leaders deemed it an obvious hate crime, demanding an inquiry. The controversy deepened when it became apparent in the midst of the inquiry that Nerland was likely an RCMP informant.


(I have no words! Totally shocked to the core! This Nazi leaning is what brought my own parents to Canada and away from the country it began in. Unfortunately there is more Naziism here in Canada than in Europe.) Sap1


In 1992, the same year the province appointed Hughes to lead the inquiry probing the handling of the Nerland case, two other homicides in the southern half of the province again brought racial tensions to the fore. This time, the victims were white, and their killers Indigenous. Dubbed the Good Samaritan cases at the time, they began on Aug. 15, 1992 when William Dove, 73, left his cottage at Round Lake to go help two young men and a teen from nearby Sakimay First Nation with flat tires on their car. He was beaten to death by David Myles Acoose, Corey Acoose, and a 16-year-old, who stole his vehicle and torched it. They pleaded guilty to manslaughter.

Later that same year, John Sorgenson, like Dove, had been asked to lend a hand to those with car trouble, and ended up dying in what the province?s highest court called a ?cold-blooded pitiless slaying.? The 41-year-old was attacked by five drunk men and teens, his body found near his burned-out truck in the Kamsack area on Sept. 4, 1992. All five accused were convicted of murder at three separate jury trials.

Four years after the deaths of the two farmers, an 88-year-old, Alvena-area farmer, who was white, shot and killed Leonard Paul John, 33, from the nearby One Arrow First Nation, north of Saskatoon, during a confrontation on the farm after a break-in. Finding the shooter acted in self-defence and no likelihood of conviction, the Justice Department opted against charges ? a decision which drew a swift response from the then-chief of the Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nations. ?If the roles were reversed ? would anybody believe that the Crown would not prosecute?? Blaine Favel told the StarPhoenix.


For some, manslaughter convictions in the Dove case became the counterpoint to critics three years later in a case reversing those roles, with an Indigenous victim and white accused. Pamela George, a low-income, single mother was killed by two middle-class, university students. Steven Kummerfield and Alexander Ternowetsky, then 20 and 19, had picked up George, who on occasion worked in the sex trade in downtown Regina. One of the pair had hidden in the trunk of the vehicle after finding another sex trade worker reluctant to get into a vehicle with the two, drunken men. The body of 28-year-old George was found on April 18, 1995 in a field near the Regina Airport. There were differing opinions by pathologists called by the Crown and defence as to whether or not she had died from exposure to the elements after being beaten and abandoned on the outskirts of the city or as a result of injuries sustained in the beating. Testimony by witnesses was peppered with allegations the men had used racist terms in later describing what had occurred to friends and in insults made when the first women wouldn?t get in their car. Their convictions for manslaughter attracted demonstrations on the steps of the courthouse and condemnation from activist groups representing women as well as the Indigenous community.

The day of the sentencing drew some 300 people to a rally at the Regina courthouse, where an irate Sakimay First Nation Chief Lindsay Kaye said, ?There is two justice systems: one justice system for the white; one justice system for the Indian people. It?s all right for a white person to kill an Indian person.? Protests followed in cities across the country.

In a pre-social media era, the Leader-Post was inundated by an unprecedented number of letters to the editor, including those from women, both Indigenous and non, decrying the outcome.


Nine months later, allegations of racism rang out in the same Regina courtroom when a jury convicted two men of murdering Fotios Frank Barlas. The battered body of the 26-year-old owner of an Indian Head restaurant was found July 4, 1996, on the Little Black Bear First Nation, from which cousins Lyle and Wayne Bellegarde hailed. As some in the white community had pointed to the Dove case in response to the outcry over the Kummerfield-Ternowetsky case, those from the Indigenous community pointed to the case of the white men in condemning the murder verdicts and life sentence for the two Indigenous men. (A third accused, also Indigenous, was acquitted.) Bellegarde supporters blamed racism, shouting in the courtroom, ?even before the trial started, you had them guilty.?

Whether some or all of the offences were racially motivated or not ? each instance turning on unique and nuanced facts and law far more detailed than the above summaries, and perceptions and mindset that reach deeper than court transcripts ? they unequivocally became racially charged. And the effects linger in distrust and suspicion within and between communities and peoples, the pressure left to build toward the next time.

After a senseless, triple murder at the start of this new millenium claimed both Indigenous and non-Indigenous lives at the hands of an enraged teen on a Fort Qu?Appelle-area First Nation, Leader-Post columnist Murray Mandryk noted:

?There?s something even worse than the province?s racial divisions that such cases bring out. It?s the fact we?ve seldom been able to learn anything from this racial rancour.

?Under such circumstances, we seldom listen to each other,? he wrote in a column nearly two decades before Wall?s tweets calling on Saskatchewan people to rise above intolerance.

?Maybe the latest tragedies can be different,? wrote Mandryk after that deadly rampage in 2001.

?Perhaps if we listen to some very legitimate concerns being raised by both communities, something positive can come from this.?

Barb Pacholik is the Leader-Post?s city co-ordinator and a columnist.

bpacholik@postmedia.com

Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on February 21, 2018, 11:27:53 PM
There is more to the Stanley case than just the fact that Martel Popescul chose himself as the Judge. Popescul and the white supremacist Nerland knew each other years before. Popescul wants to stop an inquiry in the death of Leo Lachance who was shot in the back by Nerland who claimed it was accidental. A person stopping to help Lachance was not allowed to use Nerland's phone to call for help.

http://www.windspeaker.com/news/windspeaker-news/rcmp-cant-stop-nerland-inquiry/
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: jellybean on February 22, 2018, 02:13:28 PM
Full transcript of instructions to jurors, before they went for their decision.

A long read but worth tackling it, should anyone care to.
http://nationalpost.com/news/canada/full-transcript-of-judges-instructions-to-colten-boushie-jury-put-yourself-in-a-jurors-shoes

He goes into witness believability a number of times.
jb
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on March 07, 2018, 04:09:47 AM
RCMP watchdog takes up the investigation of how Colten Boushie case was handled.

Crime scene investigation was incomplete and sloppy.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatchewan/rcmp-sloppy-and-negligent-in-investigating-colten-boushie-s-death-say-independent-experts-1.4564050

This is a very long CBC article with graphic content. They interviewed specialists in the field of forensic evidence analysis.

I won't post it because CBC article links don't go dead after awhile.
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: jtmtpleasant on March 07, 2018, 10:45:26 AM
The blatant ignorance in this thread is astounding. Two grown ass people talking shit about an Indigenous man shot point blank in the head by an ignorant racist hillbilly. And you wonder why reconciliation isn't working.

And who gives a shit if they were driving around drinking. I know many white people who grew up in Sask who say they've done the same thing. It's normal. There is literally nothing for teens to do and that's what they do. It's not an "Indian problem" you arrogant fools when white people are doing it too.

No person, whether you're Indigenous, white, purple, yellow or green ffs deserve's to get a bullet in the head.

But keep on trash talking Indigenous people and their ancestors, hillbillies. They're not the problem. You are.
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on March 07, 2018, 12:20:46 PM
jtmtpleasant, I was comparing crimes because it seems when a murder is committed there is a lot of shit thrown at whites too ... not just the perpetrator. You are right ... whites, blacks, indigenous ... youths drink and drive and party. Some of them. I grew up in a small community too. I played baseball, cricket, and spent time with animals, so I find it difficult to understand why some think drinking and driving is such a wonderful pastime.

Never did I say Colten deserved the bullet he got to his head, nor any of them for that matter. It brings tears to my eyes because just to hear that, I visualize how it happened and what the scene looked like, and it repulses me greatly. I also felt strongly regarding how the police handled the situation. I don't side with Stanley either, but I understand others' fears. I lived in the country too and had indigenous youths come up my driveway too and never thought to arm myself, but I know I would have had the fear of God in me, had a car full of people of any color driven up erratically.

I do not know if the Stanley family is racist. I have read those comments from Indigenous people. There were signs made up that Colten was shot on Indigenous land. This is where I see red! That being Indigenous land needs to be hashed out with government. My father came to Canada and bought his piece of land with blood, sweat and tears! What I own, as a single parent was also done for my kids`sake with blood, sweat and tears. What we own is ours! We am not the government! Nobody takes my things as theirs!
   

   
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on March 07, 2018, 03:17:10 PM
CBC TV had more on the subject with Anthony Gerein, Assistant Deputy of Attorney General, making a public statement as to why no appeal will be held. Not yet online, but CBC TV is well worth watching for it.

Perhaps after the independent review of police procedure is finished, there may be a possibility of another appeal.
 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatoon/boushie-s-uncle-says-it-s-like-waiting-for-a-verdict-all-over-again-1.4565538
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on March 07, 2018, 04:26:31 PM
Excerpt from another type of forum from a full blood Mohawk indigenous man. Name removed because no doubt he will not be very popular either.

Quote
no need to look into it trudeau and politicians should have kept their noses and big mouths out of it though !!!!! first of all im full mohawk and a father of a murdered 24 year old son i sat through 2 trials with a double dealing docket clearing crown attourney and 2 candyass sentencing judges one she made her own new law on the spot still on appeal however as a family man and land owner if 5 thugs tresspass onto my property steal my atv start slamming into my equipment and damaging my property i worked hard for come and im not sure where my wife and family are at the time you can bet ill come and use whatever force is necessary to end it and if i used a weapon i wouldnt miss and wouldnt misfire either nor would i be looking for colour of skin or religious beleifs or race its full blown protect my family my property and myself and i would be within my full rights to do so however i did read the court documents on this and the only fault is in the 45 minute judges charge to the jury which takes over 90 minutes to read he only mentioned that the jury could come back with a manslaughter verdict instead only once should have been at least 3 times ive been there and done that he should have made sure the jury had that in their minds but it didnt happen now you have big mouth politicians virtue signalling pandering for votes jumping in now no fair appeal; can be heard so it can never happen legally thank your local liberal on more of their lunacy as for the jury over half involved in selection were first nations and like most were not selected i cant give reasons we dont know why my guess criminal records or bias from their answers given in questioning but jury selection no matter the race in canada is generally fair so quit trying to use the race card on this the farmer protected his property just as i would and i am first nations and i wouldnt think to look for race colour of skin or religious beleif however i would have expected a manslaughter charge minimal but govt has to keep its big mouth shut in court matters and its time judges were appointed by judges and not any govt so they remain impartial to any political belief same as the attourney generals position and our ethics commissoners should be appointed by our judges and not govt so its fair law in this country for all

Quote
************ i am mohawk and do follow the red road but im dam sick and tired of ones using the race card for thugs of any race or religious belief and its fuelled by this liberal lunacy of today i feel for the family i know their loss but facts are facts if i were in that farmers shoes knowing my family is at risk and my property and the rcmp are 2 hours away from showing you can bet im coming and using all force necessary i will not bury another family member this way to unnecessary violence i also know what its like to be red growing up in a white racist town and having to fight to survive until more came in first a chineese family then 3 families of blacks and we went back to back and the hate went into the closet and i know what its like to be red and face cops and been through the courts many times myself i refuse to say there will be a racist jury this day and age there isnt one but i do not agree with the judge he should have told the jury at least 3 times that they can bring back manslaughter and it was one time and in passing a long drawn out statement but it infuriated me even more to see this liberal govt with its head lunatic weigh in with his big mouth where it doesnt belong and destroy any chance of the family getting an appeal to bring in manslaughter is rare it can happen but in this case it was a possibility until trudeau opened his big mouth now no unbias verdict can be given govt shouldnt have anything to do with our courts not even appointing judges that should be a panel of top judges same as the postions of attourney generals and our ethics commissioners by the courts not the govt then even our politicians would be treated the same under the law as they should be as any other canadian but ill stop there as this govt irates me worse than the time of justins daddy did
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: jellybean on March 07, 2018, 04:34:49 PM
You are so right, in that what we own is ours. We work hard for it, we pay for it, we own it. Land included.

The aboriginals signed Treaty Rights, and every band Treaty is different. Their forefathers negotiated these treaties, just as our forefathers tilled the land,grew cities, set up education and health care, law and order and a democratic government whereby everyone 18 and over has the right to vote. Aboriginals INCLUDED.

The Aboriginals have our attention as to their plight, but some wish to push it. As I have said, using the Boushie's as an example of Aboriginal Injustice is poor judgement. These kids were up to no good that afternoon.

And to muddle up things, the shooter exercised poor judgement that day as well..... The young tresspasers should have had multiple charges placed against them.    They were charged with nothing.  And in addition to Second Degree Murder,  an assortment of charges should have been levied against Mr. Stanley. Both sides are wrong.

I too am sick and tired of thugs, thieves, and dope heads, regardless of race. From what I have read, it is still going on in rural areas, with poor response times by law and order.

Regarding the Bouchie/Stanley tragic incident, sloppy forensic work by the RCMP have further muddied the waters for true justice.  Major screw ups, oversights, and neglectful handling of evidence, have done a disserivice to the Stanley and the Bouchie families.  Thanks to the RCMP bungling of this one, we will never get a fair and clear eyed view on exactly what happened on that tragic day.

Shame on them.

jb






 

Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on March 07, 2018, 07:40:43 PM
The blatant ignorance in this thread is astounding. Two grown ass people talking shit about an Indigenous man shot point blank in the head by an ignorant racist hillbilly. And you wonder why reconciliation isn't working.

And who gives a shit if they were driving around drinking. I know many white people who grew up in Sask who say they've done the same thing. It's normal. There is literally nothing for teens to do and that's what they do. It's not an "Indian problem" you arrogant fools when white people are doing it too.

No person, whether you're Indigenous, white, purple, yellow or green ffs deserve's to get a bullet in the head.

But keep on trash talking Indigenous people and their ancestors, hillbillies. They're not the problem. You are.

There is nothing more racist than your comments on this thread and MMWI jtmtpleasant!

In the bolded statement above, that is so not true; it is total hogwash and just more excuses for unaccountable people. Alcohol is expensive and marijuana costs $ 200. for 28 grams. For that amount of money they could buy a number of things at discount places and start a business. Nothing wrong with getting remnants of wood, carpet pieces and making cat scratching posts and little houses, and making stands for water and food bowls for large dog dishes. Girls can learn arm knitting and make affinity scarves. All good sellers at craft fairs. Damn straight I would buy these things and I know others would too. All instructions are on you tube and all of the youths have access. Of course, it's not as fun as getting drunk but it's a whole lot safer and they can earn money.

There are also a number of sports things that can be set up for cheap. There are absolutely many things that all of the youths could do with their time that is not expensive. 

Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: jellybean on March 07, 2018, 08:34:03 PM
jmtpleasant;

AS I said, both were in the wrong.  Stanley and the kids who went onto that property. They also attempted to steal from another farm, before they arrived at the Stanley's.  One also tried to start a vehicle at the Stanley's.  So, ??

And as I had said, Aboriginals should be on juries, where an Aboriginal is to stand trial, or in the case of Mr. Stanley.

I have stuck up for the plight of Aboriginals in regards to their living conditions.  The reasons are complex, in some cases, bad Chief's, in other cases deaf ears of the white world.


There are many Aboriginals  who are gainfully employed, raise good families, but we never hear about them. 

The Mohawk had made some excellent points.

And it is about time that Aboriginals start to point this out to us.  That is, there are many who are gainfully employed and raise good families. Fight back with that!!

All that we ever hear or see are run down reserves, and people living in terrible conditions.
There are successful reserves, but we never hear about them.

It is time that Canadians did.  Otherwise we feel that the situation is overwhelming, and that is not a good thing.  Nor is it a snapshot of those who lead successful lives. And that is unfair.

I am wiping the cobwebs out of my eyes, and perhaps you should do the same.

Sad Ass White

JB

Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on March 12, 2018, 08:12:19 PM
CBC's criticizing post on the investigation was made worse by an oversight. On TV and also a small print as an update to an earlier long article, the following is the mistake they made. Lies and stories will now have to be changed to reflect that, and most likely there will be no acceptance to the retraction at all.

Quote
Corrections
A previous version of this story said that after first arresting Gerald Stanley, the RCMP released him from custody before taking a formal statement. In fact, he was not released from custody. A previous version of this story also said there's no indication the RCMP ever seized Stanley's clothes. In fact, they did seize the clothing he was wearing at the time of the shooting.
Mar 12, 2018 2:34 PM CT
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: 2soccermom on March 18, 2018, 02:30:01 PM
I wholly believe race was a factor in the incident, the judgment, media reporting and popular opinion. There is overwhelming structural injustice against Indigenous peoples across Turtle Island and the provincial and federal governments have shameful records of violence. The Tina Fontaine case is a heartbreaking example of this in terms of government policy to place Indigenous children -- MINORS -- on their own in HOTELS as a "child and family services" practice. How could this ever be ok? You have to look at which kids get this treatment and consider how these minors are implicitly deemed "expendible" populations. Further, long histories of environmental racism by governments, industries, and alliances of both demonstrate WHICH communities are located beside toxic dump sites, sewage systems, and more; health care is also differentially experienced by Indigenous peoples, and I won't even bother to get started on the Indian Act.....
Canada ranks high on the global "happiness list" but it bombs, as the UN acknowledges, in its treatment of Indigenous peoples. It's devastating once yo actually learn/know what is ACTUALLY going on. The problem is that the general population in Canada is carefully and strategically taught NOT to know these things, and are left with calculated stereotypes and fear....
I think what people REALLY need to remember in the Colton Boushie case is that a young man was shot in the head at POINT BLANK range while seated in his vehicle. AND that the case was decided by an all-white jury. The latter point speaks most pointedly to the INjustice system in Canada. In other circumstances, one might at the least expect a verdict of manslaughter, since CB was NOT armed (the rifle was not operable and certainly more importantly NOT visible to GS) and GS has testified he did NOT mean to shoot. IF one opted to believe his version of events that sounds a LOT like manslaughter.
The structural inequalities that are legal, economic, political and cultural do not simply "trickle down" to interpersonal relations; they shape and frame and PRODUCE, in effect, how we understand humanity and who we consider "grieveable."  I remain shocked by this case and yet concomitantly UNsurprised. Things are breaking in our country and my heart goes out to Indigenous nations here who bear the brunt of structural violence. There has been no justice for Colton, his family, community, or Indigenous peoples more broadly. As someone of settler origin I am not proud in this to be Canadian.
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: jellybean on March 18, 2018, 03:08:30 PM
My heart always has been broken with the conditions of our Indigenous People.

I am in favor and passionate about supporting life changes.

I agree that manslaughter charges should have been given.

I do not agree that it is okay to go onto other peoples property, attempt to steal a vehicle, hit another vehicle, etc.

Did CB deserve to die for this?  Absolutely not. 

Do I strongly feel that Aboriginals should be on juries?
Always should be included.

I am not ashamed of being Canadian.  There is room for improvement, and we are making an attempt to listen, learn and work towards change.  However, change is a two way street.

These young adults had just left a farm previously that day causing hell, and angst with that farmer. Then they continued on to the Stanley's.

That was the take off point with me.... and I was unaware at the time that he was native. If I had of known, should I have looked at the situation differently?  No. I looked at this tragic event in a contained manner, it was a stand alone tragedy that never should have happened.  I was stunned. This could have been anyone's son.  Yours, mine, anyone's.  When looking at it, I left out the native issue. Both sides were in the wrong. Mr, Stanley had no business bringing a hand gun.  No excuses. The kids had no business being there.

White raiders have been shot at as well, in that hot bed of raids and thefts. 
So far, none of them have been killed, and they are lucky.

The payment of death due to trespassing, is wrong, A horrible price to pay and many of us feel that Stanley should have received some form of punishment. However, due to sloppy investigation, and the kids not being honest to the cops or the courts, it did not help the situation when it came time for the jury to come up with a verdict. The clarity of beyond reasonable doubt was simply not there.  And that is not white talk here, I believe the jury would have had the same verdict regardless of the color of the victim.

This incident arose because of the very concern that farmers had and have been complaining about for some time. It was plastered all over the media, and talked about in that area for months prior to this incident.

The main issue is that these farmers felt that they had to arm themselves, due to break ins, thefts of valuable equipment, livestock etc.
I do not agree with it, but support from  the law was not there and vigilante mind sets prevailed.  Protect themselves. The law is not on their side. The law is never on their side.  Nor should it be except in severe circumstances, and these circumstances were not severe. imo

It was well known by raiders that farmers would be armed and on the look out as they had enough.The message should be loud and clear..... do not tresspass unless you have permission to do so.

Can anyone tell me, that these kids do not bear any responsibility for this very tragic event? I say that they do bear some of it, and they should.

Not once has the family, nor supporting groups ever suggested that these young people should not have gone to that property, nor the previous property, not lie to the police, and to the courts.

It is time that both sides  grow up. Every where we look, we can find a case of miscarriage of justice in all of our courts covering all cultures.

It is time that others respect owners rights of land and their belongings.
IT IS TIME THAT FARMERS PUT THEIR GUNS AWAY.

On this thread there are examples, of real horrendous miscarriage of justice of natives, and their treatment. And to each and every judge, cop, or person who have mistreated them must bear the blame, not the whole white population.   Shame on them.
For anyone's satisfaction, Mr. Stanley is paying a hefty price for that day, albeit he is not in jail.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Now there is a law enforcement response. Too late for one farmer, and his victim.

The province has announced the creation of a new Protection and Response Team to help fight crime in rural Saskatchewan.

The team will consist of 258 armed officers with arrest and detention powers, including:

120 police officers from RCMP and municipal police services
60 police positions currently deployed to the Combined Traffic Services Saskatchewan Initiative
30 new police positions and 30 repurposed police positions currently funded by the Ministry of Justice

In addition, 40 highway commercial vehicle enforcement officers will be armed and, along with conservation officers who already carry guns, will be able to respond to calls and make arrests.


That means conservation officers could be called to break and enters if they were closer to the scene than the RCMP.


jb
Title: Re: The life and death of Colten Boushie
Post by: Sap1 on March 19, 2018, 02:16:00 PM
It is always much easier to blame others than have self reflection because with self reflection one would need to change themselves. Yes, the social system in Manitoba failed Tina but how much can an agency do when there is no co-operation? Tina ran away several times from her great aunt who cared for her and was good to her and a younger sister. She turned to child services for help. Tina ran away from foster homes as well. We don't know the whole story there why child services would put a teen into a hotel/motel. Perhaps the foster homes could not deal with a runaway all the time and felt Tina was detrimental to the children already there. What does one do when a child does not want to listen to authority? Tina wanted to be with her aunt and cousin who apparently operated a business in their house, where all types of males came back and forth.

With Colten Boushie, I don't know if race played a part as I wasn't there, nor do I know the persons involved. Reading around on the Net regarding criminal behavior in the area it seems to show that this type of entertainment happens a lot ... that is, drinking and stealing from others people's property. Often uncles and other older relatives did the same. Who is teaching these young kids as they are growing? I saw a sign that Colten's mom made for a demonstration and it said: Colten was murdered on Indigenous land. That says it all imo. Think about it!
Yes, very unfortunate that Colten was shot in the head and it saddens me deeply. But he and the others did have choices and that particular day they made some very bad and lethal choices. It is not okay either to go steal from farmers who worked hard for what they have and have paid for the land their farms sit on. When parents turn a blind eye and think it is ok to steal from others and don't educate their kids any different, they are a part of the problem. In the past few days, another farmer near Debden was robbed of a truck. Thieves aged 20 to 28 from 2 different FN were involved. Apparently the farmer also shot in the air that night, but didn't injure anyone. I have been victimized twice with robberies. Once when I lived on a farm and the second time in the city. For all of those who think it is absolutely nothing to get robbed because there is always insurance etc etc, you really need to feel robbery on yourselves and where you live. You have absolutely no idea how violated and afraid one feels!!!!! I really do not know how the farmers even sleep at night!

As regards to an all white jury: 750 people were called for jury selection in the Colten Boushie murder and this is the first case such a large number were called. 200 showed up. Of those 200 there were 5 Indigenous people who were challenged by the lawyers and Judge. Character and prior criminal activity play a role in the selection. Need I explain more? I would not have felt safe being a juror on this case after reading comments made by several people from the area. But I do know that I would have been a hold out with the jury deliberations because of reasonable doubt. When only 5 Indigenous people show up from a total call of 750 people, what does that say? Don't show up but complain later when it is too late? It is time for real honesty from all sides. Don't shake your eagle feathers at me unless you are perfect yourself!!

As far as what the UN says, I really wish they would delve deeper and see that in the majority of FN reserves, the Chief and Council live quite well and "high on the hog" with expansive expense accounts for themselves, leaving next to nothing for the tribal members whose houses are what would be demolished elsewhere. The Indigenous leaders are abusing their own in the worst possible way and there are many many examples across Canada. Atawapiscat is a great example as it was under ex-chief Theresa Spence. Then these people turn around and blame the white government. I worked in healthcare many years, so I am well aware of the care the Indigenous people get in hospitals and I worked several in the north, so I saw with my own eyes. They were treated very well. I've been around the block and no one fools me.

A few nights ago I spent hours talking with a wonderful lady in southern Saskatchewan. She happens to be a metis elder. She told me how she was shunned by her own people because she does not fall for the lies and stories by her own people. I imagine William Wuttunee (lawyer who passed a few years ago) felt the same as this lady does. In my studies I sat in on a class by a FN psychologist who told us the reason he went into Psychology was to help his own people and he found out harshley they did not want his help because he was schooled by whiteman. These kinds of attitudes will never pave a way to unitedness of cultures. No matter how many inquires there are. So many are only interested in blaming the whites, settlers. People of all colors are getting fed up now and this is causing more of a rift.
Last year I got into the 150 celebration reconciliation locally because I cared. I went to Powwows and other avenues of learning, including language but now that I realize how much hate there is and we are thrown into the pot with early explorers, I gave up. Why the hell should I carry on with hateful people???!!! My people did not kill any Indigenous nor drove anyone near extinction!! Yet I am left feeling that is how I am regarded.
My heritage is not pure ... I have Native American, African as well as German and Slavic.
If anyone cares to read up on the first people  coming to this land were various Indigenous peoples. The Indigenous were not alway here. Indigenous were the first explorers. You can also find articles on what life in the world would have been had no white settlers ever come to this land called Canada. Very interesting theories.
As I said before, people have a choice and how life plays out for all is due to choices. There are many many Indigenous who persevered and did well.