Unsolved Murders | Missing People Canada

General Category => General Discussion => Topic started by: Sap1 on August 03, 2016, 01:45:39 PM

Title: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
Post by: Sap1 on August 03, 2016, 01:45:39 PM
http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/mmiw-inquiry-launch-details-1.3704191

Families packed the great hall of the Canadian Museum of Nature in Ottawa on Wednesday — some holding signs with names and dates, others donning emblazoned T-shirts with photos of their loved ones —  to watch as the federal government announced the terms for an inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls.

Marion Buller, British Columbia's first female First Nations judge, was revealed as chief commissioner of a five-member panel tasked by Ottawa to help bring a "national tragedy to an end."

Buller said the "the survivors' losses, pain, strength and courage" will inspire the panel's work.

INTERACTIVE| Missing and murdered: The unsolved cases of Indigeous women and girls
MMIW| New unsolved cases added to CBC's database
Before she was appointed to the provincial court bench, Buller worked as a civil and criminal lawyer. She also led an initiative to open the province's first First Nations court, taking a restorative justice approach to sentencing on criminal and family court matters.

The other commissioners are:

Michèle Audette, leading women's First Nations advocate, Innu francophone and former president of the Native Women's Association of Canada.
Qajaq Robinson, Ottawa-based lawyer specializing in Aboriginal issues and land and treaty claims, born in Nunavut.
Marilyn Poitras, constitutional and Aboriginal law expert at the University of Saskatchewan.
Brian Eyolfson, First Nations and human rights lawyer, former vice-chair of the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario.
Buller acknowledged they have a "difficult" job ahead, and said they will be guided by those who have suffered from violence.

$53.8M set aside

"The spirits of the missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls will be close in our hearts and in our minds as we do our work," she said. "The families' and the survivors' losses, pain, strength and courage will inspire our work."

MMIW Inquiry 20160803
Joan Friesen, whose family member Donna Navvaq Kusugak died in 2003, wipes her eyes during the announcement of the inquiry. (Justin Tang/The Canadian Press)

The inquiry will begin Sept. 1 and run until Dec. 31, 2018, at an estimated cost of $53.8 million, higher than the $40 million earmarked in the budget.

At this point, the government takes an arm's length approach and it's up to the commission to decide when and where to meet and who to interview. The commission will have the authority to summon witnesses and compel documents.

It will examine the factors driving a systemic, high rate of violence against Indigenous women and girls, and the role of various institutions, including police forces, governments and coroners' offices.

It will also review various federal and provincial laws, but will not find criminal liability.

Certain matters can be referred to police.

The government also announced $16.17 million over four years to create family information liaison units in each province and territory, and to increase funding for culturally appropriate victims' services. Families will be able to take their questions regarding their individual cases and petition police and other institutions for answers.

Indigenous and Northern Affairs Minister Carolyn Bennett called the announcement of the inquiry's details a "historic" day, and praised the victims' family members for sharing their "heart-wrenching" stories to help set the parameters.

Carolyn Bennett
Indigenous and Northern Affairs Minister Carolyn Bennett answers questions from reporters after officially announcing the inquiry. (CBC )

"They left no doubt in our minds about the urgent need to examine the underlying and deep, systemic challenges of this violence, including racism, sexism and the sustained impact of colonialism," she said.

'Pray, pray and pray'

Justice Minister Jody Wilson-Raybould choked back tears as she stressed the need to find the root causes of the disproportionate incidence of violence.

"We need to identify the causes of these disparities and take action now to end them," she said. "The government of Canada is committed to doing better and we will take action together to reach the goal of eliminating, as much as we can, violence against Indigenous women and girls."

For Bridget Tolley of Kitigan Zibi First Nation it's been an exhausting journey to get here.

Her mother, Gladys Tolley, was struck and killed on Oct. 5, 2001, by a Quebec provincial police cruiser while she was walking across a highway.

"I hope we get that justice. Pray, pray and pray. Pray for us, we want justice. It hurts too much. I don't want to do this any more. It hurts," she said, breaking down in tears.

"I'm just hoping and praying that this helps some families if not mine, that's all."

MMIW Inquiry 20160803
Bridget Tolley, whose mother Gladys was killed in 2001, is embraced after the announcement of the inquiry. (THE CANADIAN PRESS)

Denise Maloney Pictou, whose mother Anna Mae Pictou-Aquash, a Nova Scotia Mi'kmaq, was killed in South Dakota in 1976 by members of the American Indian Movement, said the inquiry is symbolically significant because it acknowledges that the lost lives had real value.

While some are skeptical that the process will yield answers and action, Maloney Pictou said most are grateful for the inquiry.

Lukewarm reception

"We're all very nervous. We're hopeful. We have faith," she said.

Dawn Lavell-Harvard, president of the Native Women's Association of Canada (NWAC), says she's grateful the issue of murdered and missing Indigenous women is in the spotlight, but worried about the commission's direction.

For starters, she's concerned that family members won't be able to reopen cases through the justice system.

"Families made it very clear that they wanted answers, that many cases they felt were closed prematurely, that they don't accept the conclusion. They wanted those reopened" she said.

Lavell-Harvard said she still needs time to review the new government funding announced Wednesday, like the family information liaison units, to see if they'll adequately serve families. 

The NWAC president said she's also worried about how provincial laws and regional police are dissected.

"Girls have described that they were trafficked, they were recruited into the sex trade from group homes, foster homes and hotels where they were under the care of the child welfare system," said Lavell-Harvard, who added she'll be monitoring the commission's progress. "We cannot ignore the fact that many family members and survivors of violence do not feel like they were treated respectfully or fairly by the justice system."

Counselling concerns

She also said while culturally based trauma counselling will be offered, it's limited to how long witnesses are in front of the commission.

"We know trauma does not have a timeframe. We know that families need to be prepared, that families need support, not just while they're appearing before the commissioners, but when they return home, when those wounds are reopened."

MMIW Inquiry 20160803
AFN National Chief Perry Bellegarde speaks during a press conference following the announcement of the inquiry. (Justin Tang/The Canadian Press)

 Assembly of First Nations National Chief Perry Bellegarde said his job will to ensure the eventual recommendations are implemented.

"Indigenous women and girls, their lives matter," he said. "It's a national tragedy, but it's an international shame."

Cathy McLeod, the Conservative Party's critic for Indigenous affairs, said it is significant that all political parties, provinces and territories supported the inquiry, noting it reflects a common view that the situation is "unacceptable" in Canada.

But she said there have already been a number of reports and recommendations and it's time to start taking steps that will make a real difference, from building on successful prevention programs to ensuring police have the resources to investigate and solve crimes.

Past reports, recommendations

The inquiry's terms of reference note eight other inquiries or studies related to violence against indigenous women and gender-based violence.

"If we're spending $50-plus million on an inquiry, it's $50-plus million that could have been going towards shelters and programs and services. So it's got to provide real tangible path forward," said McLeod.

A 2015 United Nations report found that young First Nations, Métis and Inuit women were five times more likely to die under violent circumstances than their non-Indigenous counterparts.

In 2014, the RCMP found nearly 1,200 documented cases of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls between 1980 and 2012, a number Mounties said exceeded previous estimates​.

The commission's interim report is due before Nov. 1, 2017, and a final report with their expectations exactly a year later.
Title: Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
Post by: Sap1 on August 07, 2016, 06:20:39 PM
Okay, this article is different from the one above, however in my opinion cases like this should be looked at while doing the Inquiry.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatchewan/indian-posse-richard-wolfe-death-prison-1.3606065

The life story of Richard Daniel Wolfe, who died Friday while an inmate at the Prince Albert Penitentiary, is a difficult to comprehend mix of disturbing crimes — including attempted murder and violent sexual assault — and a tragic, disadvantaged childhood where one of his earliest experiences was of being locked in a storage room at elementary school for misbehaving.

'Sexual abuse left Richard confused, ashamed and full of hate.'
- Saskatchewan Court of Queen's Bench sentencing decision
Wolfe, who founded the Indian Posse street gang with his brother, died after being found in need of medical attention in the exercise yard of the Saskatchewan prison.

The Correctional Service of Canada said Wolfe, 40, was taken to hospital where he was pronounced dead Friday night. A news release from the agency said the circumstances of the incident were being investigated, but offered no further details on what happened. Calls to the service were not returned.

Richard Daniel Wolfe, notorious Indian Posse gang founder, dies in prison

Wolfe is the older brother of Daniel Wolfe, who was killed during a brawl at the same prison on Jan. 4, 2010, while the younger man was serving time for a double murder.

Richard Wolfe
Richard Daniel Wolfe, a founder of the Indian Posse gang, died Friday while an inmate at the Prince Albert Penitentiary in Saskatchewan. (RCMP)

According to a 1994 article by the Winnipeg Free Press, the brothers founded the Indian Posse gang in 1989 in the basement of their mother's Winnipeg home. Richard would have been about 13 at the time and had just started on what would become a lifetime of interactions with the criminal justice system.

Court documents show Wolfe had a string of breaking and entering convictions as a youth and spent a lot of his teen years in and out of youth custody facilities.

"He was raised in an environment where substance abuse and domestic violence was prevalent," a sentencing judge wrote in January of this year. "Richard was repeatedly exposed to violence which occurred during his parents' house parties. He was sexually abused at the age of seven, once by a stranger and twice by a neighbour. The episodes of sexual abuse left Richard confused, ashamed and full of hate."

Brothers lived in poverty

The judge also remarked on how the brothers managed to survive with little supervision.

"They lived in poverty with little to eat," the judge said. "Richard and Daniel soon learned to steal vegetables from gardens and food from dumpsters simply to survive. Richard first began using drugs at the age of 10 or 11, and by the age of 11, he had begun consuming alcohol."

The court record also includes reports on Wolfe's difficult time in the education system.

At Fairday School in Winnipeg, one report said Wolfe was subjected to harsh discipline for misbehaviour. One punishment was being locked in a storage room for long stretches of time by a teacher.

"I was the only one he would leave in there for longer than 10 minutes," Wolfe said in the report, adding he felt lonely and scared.

"It wasn't right, because I shouldn't have been treated like that," he said.

The creation of a gang, according to one sentencing judge, was something that gave the Wolfe brothers confidence as well as a sense of purpose and an income.

Wolfe was most recently sentenced in January to five years for an attack and sex assault on a couple in Fort Qu'Appelle, Sask, in 2014, which happened while he was on statutory release from a 19½-year sentence for attempted murder of a Winnipeg pizza delivery man.

Indian Posse a notorious gang

The Indian Posse gang has been linked with crime and violence in and out of prison walls for many years.

Officials said an 18-hour riot at the Headingley Correctional Centre in Manitoba in 1996 grew out of a feud between the Indian Posse and a rival gang, the Manitoba Warriors. Eight guards and 31 prisoners were beaten.

In a 2005 report, Alberta's Criminal Intelligence Service said the Indian Posse street gang had built drug networks south of Edmonton and in Fort McMurray, Grande Prairie and Peace regions. Residents of the Samson Cree Nation in Alberta also blamed a rivalry between the Indian Posse and other gangs for a crime wave that included the shooting of 23-month-old Asia Saddleback, who survived after she was hit by a stray bullet while in a home in 2008.

tp-RichardWolfe080918
Daniel Richard Wolfe, the younger brother of Richard Daniel Wolfe, died in a prison brawl in 2010. (Submitted to CBC)

In 2010, RCMP included the Indian Posse among a list of native gangs, including the Native Syndicate and Manitoba Warriors, stating they had spread across the West and were even in rural areas of B.C., northern Ontario and the Far North.

Indian Posse co-founder wanted on sex assault charge

The couple Wolfe assaulted in 2014 was helping him turn his life around after his last release from custody. But Wolfe had broken his sobriety and sexually assaulted the woman, then attacked her boyfriend with a baseball bat when he awoke to her screams.

At the time of the attack, Wolfe managed to stay sober for a period of time and had begun speaking to young people about the dangers of gang life.

With files from CBC's John Weidlich
© The Canadian Press, 2016
Title: Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
Post by: Sap1 on August 22, 2016, 04:35:52 PM
So far we have mostly heard one voice --- those crying victim, and blaming. We need to hear the other voices, like those in the following article ... those that were thankful for the education received which enabled them to find employment.
Interesting older article from 2014. Let us finally hear all voices then, rather than just one collective negative voice since the inquiry is going ahead to the tune of over 80,000 million, thanks to all taxpayers. Since we have no choice, I for one, want to hear all the truths, not just the blaming of the white peoples.

http://news.nationalpost.com/full-comment/paul-russell-could-it-be-that-residential-schools-werent-so-bad

On June 11, 2008, Stephen Harper issued an apology for the residential school system in Canada. He called it a “sad chapter in our history,” noting that its primary objectives “were to remove and isolate children from the influence of their homes, families, traditions and cultures, and to assimilate them into the dominant culture … the government of Canada sincerely apologizes and asks the forgiveness of the aboriginal peoples of this country for failing them so profoundly. Nous le regrettons. We are sorry. Nimitataynan. Niminchinowesamin. Mamiattugut.”

The National Post has carried many stories about these schools before and since that apology. And every time we do, it is interesting to see that most of the letters we receive argue that the schools have been unfairly portrayed in the media.

That phenomenon was on display again this week, following the publication of last Saturday’s story, “4,000 Children died in residential schools; Truth commission.” As that story detailed, “commission officials expect that number to rise as researchers access much more complete files from Library and Archives Canada and elsewhere.”

Letter writers commenting on that story this week complained that the article lacked important historical context.

“Nice work, National Post, as you continue to dump on the charitable work accomplished by generations of selfless missionaries, physicians, nurses and teachers of the Canadian North,” wrote C. Lutz, of Haliburton, Ont. “[This story] heavily spins out a ‘physical and sexual abuse’ [narrative] as if 150,000 Indian and Inuit children had gained nothing good from taxpayer-provided white education. At least some of them learned enough English and French to, fluently, play the system and bite the hand that had fed them.”


“By today’s standards, 4,000 deaths out of a total of 150,000 students is shocking,” wrote Russel Williams of Georgeville, Que. “But given the period covered, 1870 to 1996, it may compare quite favourably with Canada at large, or Canadian aboriginal communities specifically, for the same period. One must bear in mind that much of this period predates immunization for smallpox, whooping cough, and diphtheria. It also predates penicillin for treatment of TB. Given the above, perhaps the statistic is not as alarming as it first might seem.”

“It was undoubtedly a terrible thing to be taken from your family, but in the early days, the reserves were impoverished and 90% of First Nations people were infected with tuberculosis,” added Michelle Stirling. “It is hard to say if the students got tuberculosis at the residential schools. And until the 1950s, tuberculosis was the leading cause of death of all Canadians.

“I am aware that some people will feel that I am defending the known cases of abuse and cruelty — I do not defend these,” Ms. Stirling continued. “My own father was the victim of the same [abuse] at the hands of his own white Anglo-Saxon teachers at his British boarding school. He used to have his left hand beaten black and blue and tied behind his back because he was left-handed.”

We also heard from a non-native who attended the St. Paul’s Indian Residential School in southern Alberta (the Blood/Kainai Reserve) for six years.

“When so many Canadians rely on publications like the National Post to stay informed on important issues, it is disappointing to see an article like that,” wrote Mark DeWolf of Halifax. “How does this figure compare to the number of First Nations children who died outside of the schools? Over 126 years and out of 150,000 students, the figure is perhaps not so surprising, given the deplorable health conditions on some reserves and high rates of communicable illness. More could and should have been done to ensure the health of these students, but let’s have responsible journalism, not emotional pandering to readers.”

“The last of the Truth and Reconciliation Canada (TRC) national events comes up at the end of March in Edmonton, and I hope to be there,” Mr. DeWolf added. “It will be interesting to see if the media just parrot what native leaders, TRC employees and other aboriginal activists repeatedly say, or if the occasion gives rise to some serious discussion of the schools, the harm they did and the more positive aspects as well.”

On Wednesday, we ran a letter that began as follows: “There are many native Canadians who appreciate the benefits of the schools where they received an education that enabled them to cope with life outside the reserves. How about recounting some of their testimonials?”

A few more notes came in after that, each echoing that same point. Here is one example.

“How refreshing to see the letter from Michael Barnes,” wrote Jeannie L’Esperance. “When traveling by plane in the North, I have had people tell me how grateful they were for the training they received in a residential school, which helped them find employment.”

Did you or a family member attend a residential school? In 250 words or fewer, tell us about your experience, good or bad, at letters@nationalpost.com.

National Post

prussell@nationalpost.com
Title: Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
Post by: debbiec on August 22, 2016, 04:50:46 PM
Quote
So far we have mostly heard one voice --- those crying victim, and blaming. We need to hear the other voices, like those in the following article ... those that were thankful for the education received which enabled them to find employment.
Interesting older article from 2014. Let us finally hear all voices then, rather than just one collective negative voice since the inquiry is going ahead to the tune of over 80,000 million, thanks to all taxpayers. Since we have no choice, I for one, want to hear all the truths, not just the blaming of the white peoples.


I totally agree with your comment Sap1. Just reading this one article helps put some things in perspective a little.
Title: Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
Post by: jellybean on August 22, 2016, 06:47:05 PM
I totally agree.  We are running around with a guilt complex, because we have been blamed for all of the conditions harming our aboriginal communities.

I am certainly one who wants to see their standard of living raised, as do most of us, but I am tired of the impression left, that this all of our making. That every unfortunate thing that happens to them is our fault.

In my opinion their is plenty of blame to go around - including  aboriginals themselves.

Many aboriginals are Dr's, lawyers, etc. and we never hear about that. It would be great if they mentored their own people, to show them that many things are possible. And if they are doing so, then at least let the general public know that successful natives are reaching out to their own people.  At the very least, they owe them that much.

jb
Title: Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
Post by: 2soccermom on August 22, 2016, 07:19:29 PM
For my part, I don't think the issue is too much reporting. I see a significant part of the problem is that First Nations history is so seldom taught (or taught well) in the Canadian education system; this is because few of the teachers trained have experience and knowledge in this history themselves and so the cycle simply repeats itself.  As just one example: I really wonder how many Canadians know about the Indian Act, and sections 12(1)b, C-31, and now C-3 which has ongoing implications for Indigenous women and their communities? It took the United Nations Committee on Human Rights to decide in 1981 or 1982 that Canada was in extreme violation of its human rights commitment in continued structural discrimination (in C-31; this is legislation that discriminated against status women who "married out" to, say, non-status men, as opposed to non-status women who "married in"; this is because Canadian law upheld the idea that status women follow the conditions of their husbands and fathers! And the Supreme Court, as Canada's highest law, refused to see the concomitant racism and sexism of that legislation; it took an international body to rule that, out of the very brave insistence of Indigenous women not to back down despite the force of the law) -- with critical implications for missing and murdered women because status women who married out HAD to leave reserve, lost their right to property there, and connections to their cultural community; if the marriage dissolved, they legally remained dispossessed! (And so much more) -- and there is a new appeal to the UNCHR for its successor legislation, even if the current C-3 has different implications and effects than C-31. So I understand how people may feel media is saturated recently with particular repeated kinds of reports but on the other hand I quite regularly find in my travels folks with LOTS of opinions on, say, treaties and land rights, language, structural and interpersonal discrimination and broader Indigenous rights with very little actual knowledge or education on the context and history of the issues they feel -- and speak! -- so passionately about. I'm all for diverse and plentiful discussion on this -- indeed, the Royal Commission's report exhorts Canadians AND its education system to engage these very things! But I think the larger body of knowledge into which MMIW is plugged is the conversation that is most glaringly missing in popular understanding. I understand how people might feel thet are getting a LOT of info now and with one kind of focus -- I agree we meed much much more to hear and learn. So I'm glad for this thread -- thank you for starting it, SAP. And I think it was ahhhh-mazing for Gord Downie to take time out of his epic last concert to speak to First Nations issues! Makes me more than ever proud to be both Canadian AND a Hip fan!
(And, by the way: I'm so hopeful for new teachers and new learning today, and grateful to those teachers and students who have worked on their own in their past to actually *learn* Indigenous history and epistemology)
Title: Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
Post by: Sap1 on August 22, 2016, 08:00:36 PM
You are definitely well versed, Soccermom. I think too that Indigenous history needs to be taught in schools, however not just one sided.

In my medical training we had an Indigenous speaker ... this is many years ago ... he had studied Psychology and one thing he told us was that once he left the reserve he was no longer welcome back because he had studied white man's schooling. His intentions were to go back and help his own people but they didn't want him back and didn't want his help.

Title: Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
Post by: 2soccermom on August 22, 2016, 08:10:32 PM
I'm not sure how long ago it was that your speaker was not welcome back to reserve but there are legal implications and longstanding colonial legacies that I see at work here and, again, many Canadians have little understanding or knowlege of Canada's legal histories of violence against Indigenous Canadians. For example: it was law under the IA for status "Indians" to be forcibly disenfranchised: "it was automatic if an Indian became a doctor, lawyer, Christian minister, or earned a university degree"  -- which means that Canadian law refused those folks the right to reside in reserve. (There are MUCH better sources that address this history written from Indigenous perspectives by Indigenous people, but I am citing a fed gov source http://www.lop.parl.gc.ca/content/lop/researchpublications/bp410-e.htm). In a nutshell: people who had elite professional training in the Canadian system **were not allowed to return to reserve under Canadian law** and there are longstanding effects of this law in Indigenous communities. Its really quite interesting to learn about legal and political history in this country in ways that expand what most of us get in the traditional telling of history.
Title: Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
Post by: 2soccermom on August 22, 2016, 08:16:27 PM
I also appreciate how people may see Indigenous-centred history as "one-sided" but I strongly believe this is still an effect of colonial and neo-colonial training, because we have already been given one-sided history from the colonizers' perspectives throughout most of our formal training in the Canadian education system  and it has become so natural to us we don't recognize it FOR its very familiarity. I don't mean this to sound judgmental at all or like a lecture -- I'm not exempt from these histories either. I'm complicit too. I cited the gov source because some people say Indigenous perspectives are biased -- as if government sources aren't biased also! EVERYTHING comes from its own locations and investments, right? Me too :)
I agree that we need balanced reporting but that balance will take a LOT of Indigenous-centred  history written by Indigenous peoples and their allies to even begin the tilting process, as the Royal Commission's Report identified so strongly.
Title: Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
Post by: 2soccermom on August 22, 2016, 08:41:13 PM
and this last post is a bit of an apology: I certainly don't mean to diss the gov source I cited and which I quite like but it occurs to me belatedly that it is *quite* problematic on my part to make assumptions about the identity locations of the writers who actually submitted the report. The brief is good -- I really meant to address the limitations of the *genre* of gov't-styled and/or solicited research :) (and even so that intention has its issues). lol, sigh: I was thinking and typing on the fly, when I know more measured response is always good :)
Title: Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
Post by: jellybean on August 22, 2016, 09:18:06 PM
The present government is working to set things right. The problem is very complex, and generations of natives have lived in abject poverty and disenfranchised from society.
It will take more than money to fix it.

It will also take the continued  cooperation  of natives  - to  create positive results within their communities.

It can be very discouraging at times - as no two bands are alike - and it is difficult to get them to agree in amongst themselves on the path going forward.

Proper housing, schools and medical facilities are less than third world on some of  the northern native reserves.  The taxpayers will have to set it right.
And the government should move quickly. No hand holding - and sympathizing with their plight.  Just get it done!

I agree that many treaties have held natives back, and yet, it is the first thing that they recite and uphold when they are displeased.

Aboriginal studies should be taught in school.  It is part of our Canadian fabric, and we should know it. Obviously, I do not know it, and it shows.

Like most Canadians, when it comes to aboriginals, I can only go by my own experiences.  I have known many well grounded natives, who sadly, had to leave the reserve, to make something out of their lives.
They kept an open mind, were eager to learn and to work - to work darn hard and made it.

I also see, many, who struggle and lack the most basic of skills, who sadly end up on skid row, along side whites - I might add. They are people first and it is heartbreaking.

I have high hopes for change through the AFN organization. The present leader Perry Bellegarde is an exceptional human being, an articulate spokesperson for the plight of his people, a calm and persistent negotiator with the government, and will create change if given the chance. He has caught the attention of all Canadians!!

But, we will see - if this time - there is less in-fighting and power struggles from the chiefs  by way of  more cooperation than given to their AFN leaders in the past.

http://www.afn.ca/Assembly_of_First_Nations.htm

jb
Title: Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
Post by: Sap1 on August 23, 2016, 07:29:24 AM
I'm placing a recent article here for review and for re-orientation for all of us in regards the Indian Act, etc. Some things are coming back to me from lectures regarding FN peoples from my studies in the healthcare sector when my training was at a then federal hospital primarily for FN peoples, however I need to refresh myself also.

At first glance on the article I see problems that were not just so for aboriginals placed on reserves as far as restrictions go. Government also did this to newcomers from other countries. I know countless families whose names were changed, my fathers included. Other restrictions applied to newcomers as well depending from which country the newcomer was from.

For my part I never could see why FN were placed on "reserves" b/c I believe all people can live together in large or small communities in towns and cities, in the country, etc and all benefit from each other as equals.

You will need to click on the link as some of the links within do not transfer.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/aboriginal/21-things-you-may-not-know-about-the-indian-act-1.3533613

The Indian Act has been a lightning rod for criticism and controversy over the years, widely attacked by First Nations people and communities for its regressive and paternalistic excesses.

For example, Status Indians living on reserves don't own the land they live on; assets on reserve are not subject to seizure under legal process making it extremely difficult to borrow money to purchase assets; and matrimonial property laws don't apply to assets on reserve.

The act has also been criticized by non-Aboriginal Peoples and politicians as being too paternalistic and creating an unjust system with excessive costs that are considered uneconomical.

Dark history of Canada's First Nations pass system uncovered in documentary
Indian Act turns 140, but few celebrating
Indian Status: 5 more things you need to know
The Indian Act gave Canada a coordinated approach to Indian policy rather than the pre-Confederation piece-meal approach.

"The great aim of our legislation has been to do away with the tribal system and assimilate the Indian people in all respects with the other inhabitants of the Dominion as speedily as they are fit to change," stated John A. Macdonald, in 1887.

The Act imposed great personal and cultural tragedy on First Nations, many of which continue to affect communities, families and individuals today.

Here are 21 restrictions imposed at some point by the Indian Act in its 140 years of existence.

The Indian Act:

Denied women status
Introduced residential schools
Created reserves
Renamed individuals with European names
Restricted First Nations from leaving reserve without permission from Indian agent
Pass system for Yahyahkeekoot
A two week pass for Edward Yahyahkeekoot from the Saskatchewan Archives Board. This is one of the few remaining passes found in a Canadian archive, and is proof of the pass system, implemented in 1885. The policy controlled the movement of First Nation people off reserves. (Tamarack Productions)

 
Enforced enfranchisement of any First Nation admitted to university
Could expropriate portions of reserves for roads, railways and other public works, as well as move an entire reserve away from a municipality if it was deemed expedient
Could lease out uncultivated reserve lands to non-First Nations if the new leaseholder would use it for farming or pasture
Forbade First Nations from forming political organizations
Prohibited anyone, First Nation or non-First Nation, from soliciting funds for First Nation legal claims without special license from the Superintendent General. (this 1927 amendment granted the government control over the ability of First Nations to pursue land claims)
Prohibited the sale of alcohol to First Nations
Prohibited sale of ammunition to First Nations
Prohibited pool hall owners from allowing First Nations entrance
Imposed the "band council" system
Forbade First Nations from speaking their native language
Forbade First Nations from practicing their traditional religion
Forbade western First Nations from appearing in any public dance, show, exhibition, stampede or pageant wearing traditional regalia
Declared potlatch and other cultural ceremonies illegal
Denied First Nations the right to vote
Created permit system to control First Nations ability to sell products from farms
Created under the British rule for the purpose of subjugating one race —  Aboriginal Peoples
Major amendments were made to the Act in 1951 and 1985. In the 1951 amendments, the banning of dances and ceremonies, and the pursuit of claims against the government were removed. In the 1985, Bill C-31 was introduced. For more on this Bill, please see "Indian Act and Women's Status - Discrimination via Bill C31 and Bill C3"

   
   
   
   
   
   
Title: Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
Post by: jellybean on August 23, 2016, 07:19:09 PM
Soccermom2: No need to apologize, what so ever! You spoke the truth, and with clarity.

Yes, our views are one sided. We are just beginning to listen.... and to attempt to set the "wrongs" right. 

However, I am afraid that some demands are getting out of hand.  They are in the billions of dollars, of which we, as a country do not have.

That is the reality.

 I cannot be held hostage to my ancestors decisions. I had no part in it.

At present there is another group of aboriginals who are suing the federal govt for 1.2 billion dollars because from the early 60s through to the 80's children were removed from their families and either placed up for adoption or placed in foster homes.  One woman claims that she did not learn her language and therefore cannot communicate with her mother.
$85,000 per child is the tab.

Now for argument purposes, let us take a child from a bad home where English is spoken, and the child is placed with a french family.  Should they sue because they cannot speak their mother's tongue?

It can and is getting out of hand.  imo
What is good for the goose, is good for the gander?
Good clean warm housing, proper education and good health facilities, affordable food is urgently required on some reserves.  This will also be in the in the billions.
That - I will buy into.

Not knowing their mother tongue (many natives don't by the way) for $85,000 I will never buy into.  Native language classes are offered throughout our educational system.
If they were physically abused in foster homes, then that is a different story.
They have every right to sue the agency that placed them there.

The Indian Act should be abolished. And get rid of the strangle hold of Indian Affairs.
If the land is owned by a tribe - they should have the right to parcel it out and allow private property ownership to their own people. Perhaps this is already taking place on some reserves.  I don't know.


jb

Title: Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
Post by: jellybean on August 23, 2016, 08:52:15 PM
They have  a huge ageda going forward.  I have bolded a few.
http://www.afn.ca/uploads/files/2016_aga_resolutions_1-69_fe2.pdf.pdf

ASSEMBLY OF FIRST NATIONS
2016 ANNUAL GENERAL ASSEMBLY– NIAGARA FALLS, ON
FINAL RESOLUTIONS

# Title
01 Support for First Nations Youth Life Promotion Calls to Action
02 Support for the Montreal Lake Cree Nation Emergency Response Search and Rescue Team Proposal
03 Support for the Registered Disability Savings Plan
04 Declaration of November as Indigenous Disability Awareness Month
05 Support for Indigenous Disability and Wellness Gathering
06 Call to Action that Health Canada Non-Insured Health Benefits list provide a new treatment for type 2 Diabetes called
Jardiance
07 Supporting Partnerships with Indigenous Health Organizations
08 Increased and enhanced flexibility of mental wellness funding to First Nation communities
09 Support for Community-based Health Surveillance Systems
10 Support for a Primary Health Care Centre (Hospital) in Island Lake Manitoba
11 Support for Engagement in the Health Accord Discussions
12 Moving Beyond Federal Legislation To Establish a Nation-To-Nation Relationship

13 Calling for a National Reconciliation Process & Implementing the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples
Recommendations
14 Support for the World Indigenous Peoples Conference on Education 2017
15 Support for Indigenous Ways of Knowing at the Canada Wide Science Festival
16 Honourable Process to Develop Recommendations to support First Nations Education Reform
17 Call on Canada to update the Additions to Reserve Policy (ATR)
18 Support for Atlantic Salmon Emergency Critical Habitat Order
19 Fish-WIKS Fisheries Western and Indigenous Knowledge Systems
20 Long Term Sustainability of Kashechewan (Albany) First Nation Reserve # 67
21 Support for Continued Partnership between Indigenous Peoples and the Labourers’ International Union of North America
(LiUNA)
22 Reaffirmation of the Chiefs Committee on Human Resources Development
23 Support for the National Indian Football Association Canada
24 Support for Acting on Climate Change Indigenous Initiatives Project
25 Support for Grassy Narrows and Other Mercury Impacted Communities
26 Support For Bill S-215 An Act To Amend The Criminal Code (Sentencing For Violent Offenses Against Aboriginal Women)
27 Support for the concept of inherent and Treaty rights card
28 United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples 10 Year Anniversary
29 Engaging in Climate Action and the Environment
30 Declaration to Honour Indigenous Women and Girls
31 Recognizing and Protecting First Nations Sacred Heritage Sites and Ancestral Burial Grounds
32 Wanuskewin Heritage Park UNESCO Application, “Thundering Ahead”
33 National Indigenous Peoples Statutory Holiday and Indigenous Peoples History Month
34 Responsibility to Investigate Allegations of Abuse brought against Mr. John Furlong
35 First Nations’ inclusion in the review of Environmental and Regulatory processes
36 Inherent and Treaty Right to Post-Secondary Education
37 Establishing a Crown-First Nations Process on Land, Peoples and Governance

38 Protection and Promotion of Free Prior informed Consent of Indigenous Rights holders
39 First Nations National Working Group on Early Learning and Child Care (ELCC)
# Title
40 Call on Canada to address the backlog for eligible First Nation post-secondary students
41 Nechi Institute - Centre of Indigenous Learning
42 International Child Custody
43 Support for rescinding CMHC Request for Proposal for technical services on reserve
44 First Nations, Forests, and Climate change in BC
45 National Water Conservation and Protection Strategy for The Great Lakes
46 Maskwacis Boil Water Advisories Shoot-Out Wastewater Systems and Shock Chlorination
47 First Nations to Access Economic Opportunities Through a First Nations Agricultural Strategy
48 Indigenous Human Rights and Responsibilities for the Protection of Mother Earth within Climate Change Action
49 US and Canada Softwood Lumber Agreement Negotiations
50 Canada – USA Softwood Lumber Dispute
51 Call for Action on the Pipeline Safety Act
52 Support a New Process on Land Rights Issues Over $150 Million
53 Call for the Immediate Implementation of “Deep Consultation” on the Proposed Energy East Pipeline Project

54 OCAP® Training Prerequisite for all Federal/Provincial/Territorial Government Employees and Researcher
55 First Nation Federal Accessibility Legislation
56 Natural Resource Transfer Act (NRTA) Violation of Inherent Aboriginal and Treaty Rights
57 Funding for Regional First Nations Information Government Centres

58 Nishnawbe Aski Police Service
59 First Nations Citizenship
60 Recognition of Indigenous Peoples as Founding Peoples of Canada
61 Privacy of Survivor’s IAP and CEP documents
62 Full and Proper Implementation of the historic Canadian Human Rights Tribunal decisions in the provision of child welfare
services and Jordan’s Principle
63 Support Muskowekwan In Adopting and Implementing a Cultural Responsiveness Framework
64 Support for Stk’emlupsemc te Secwepemc Nation Project Assessment Process
65 Support for Repatriating Ceremonial and Cultural Artifacts
66 Support Garry McLean and Spirit Wind Indian Day Schools Class Action
67 Support to protect Anticosti Island from Industrialization
68 Support World Indigenous Trade and Enterprise Summit and Festival
69 Support for the Peel River Watershed in Yukon Territory
Title: Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
Post by: Sap1 on August 24, 2016, 01:22:47 AM
Possibly I may be one of those with LOTS of opinions and little knowledge?

Canada was a land with a lot of space that other countries eyed due to the oppression they were facing in their home countries. People came from all over Europe, and thousands of black slaves that were able to escape from their captors in USA came across the border to a land that offered them freedom. All these people were forever grateful for the opportunity. Even though it meant much hard work starting settlements and establishing farming. They worked hard after coming to regions that were populated with trees and brush. With simple tools they took down trees and built their houses and they cleared land for crops the same way ... blood, sweat and tears! The ex-slaves were not American, rather hundreds of thousands of people "taken" by force and thrown into the bottom of ships ... from Caribbean nations to other areas. They were often packed in like sardines at the lower part of the ships and sometimes dying down there due to lack of food and water and other necessary amenities. Those that managed to survive amongst the putrid smells were sold as slaves upon entering American soils. Those that were able to escape to Canada  thought they were in heaven. From all those families, there were many whom advanced this country.

When my father came to this country he was given land not of his choice, and this he had to repay when he began having some income from the land. With an axe he began the task of clearing dense forest, and with the same axe he cleared the bark off the trees for lumber to build his first house, while continuing to clear bush for crops and building fences for cattle. Cutting the lumber from logs was also done in a primitive fashion but it sufficed.
I never heard him ever complain how rough life was in the beginning. My mother came a year later along with their first son. Not knowing the language I will never know exactly how she made it to a distant plot of land in the middle of winter. She missed the signs she was to look for to make her way to her new home and ended up having to walk 12 miles back ... with all her baggage and a child ... in the mid of the night. My parents came at a very young age,  I was born late in my parents' lives so I didn't experience any of this, however it still saddens me to this day all the hardships they came through and never lost a step ... kept working hard to get ahead. The only problem was ... they both came from German ports and thus were not trusted ... they might be Hitler's people of all things! It was the Hitler regime they were getting away from, however the Anglo's running immigration offices seemed rather dense and ignorant. My parents ( and many others) had to report in a small town 15 miles from home once a month to report they were not doing anything untoward. On one such occasion the date they had to report was a blizzard day ... to cut it short, my mother almost froze to death and had to be hospitalized after. Yet for all the years following, my parents never BLAMED anyone and my mothers' teachings were always the same ... no matter how much someone has hurt you, let it go and put it behind you. Many people were ostracized because Anglo's thought they were Hitler's people.
I suppose my parents could have given up and found solace in the bottle of alcohol but they didn't. They raised everyone of their kids to work hard and appreciate life no matter how difficult it was. They never expected handouts and were never given any. Sometimes farmers helped each other in later years, having barn raisings, similar in fashion to Habitat for Humanity now.
Up the road about 12 miles was a metis colony of which many of the young men would come by during the times seeding and harvesting was being done and would ask for work. My father always hired them and they sat at our table and ate with us and slept under the same roof as we did. I had heard that some farmers put them up in the barn where they slept in the hayloft but my father would never have done such a cruel thing to other humans.
All these people who came from other lands and broke the land with blood, sweat and tears were one hell of an asset to the country!

So yes, I am opinionated! They had absolutely nothing to do with the laws Anglo's set out for aboriginals and I am certain they never would have agreed to such. Great ignorance played a part in those laws. My parents and others like them had it very difficult here too but they put it all behind them and forged ahead. Never asking for a handout for hardships and never getting any. Just thankful, very thankful!

What I see now is that there are many people who do not want to leave the reserves to find work. All the reserves get a lot of funding, some more than others. Take Attawapiskat for example ... where the inner circle of a very few all drive SUV's and live well, while the rest live in housing that molding and rotting with snow blowing in, in the winter. No one seems to know where the money has gone because they didn't keep records. There are many such areas across Canada. Yet they want more money and they are creating their own problems for the young people. But somehow it is OUR fault! Why?

There have been many inquiries already and how will another costly one change anything? Whatever damage was done back then in residential schools can not be fixed with financial handouts. Money does not cure depression or any other mental ills that have come out of all of that.

   

 
Title: Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
Post by: jellybean on August 24, 2016, 11:27:06 AM
Well said Sap1!! Yes, German's were suspect, and sadly  Japanese Cdn families  were placed in camps. Boatloads of jews who arrived for safety were turned back from our shores, so I have learned. The Ukrainians were also badly treated, and god forbid if you were Russian.

Our history has it dark pages, seldom mentioned, and of which we know little.
War brings out the worst in human nature, as we see it take place even today.

Thank you for sharing.  It gives us pause for thought.


I am an Anglo Canadian, and yet
I can never turn my back to immigrants.

I remember all too well, how the Hungarians and Chec's were treated when they escaped Communistic regimes and fled to Canada. Quite frankly, I was very young, and seeing this through young eyes, I was capable of feeling sadness and a sense of shame for Adult behavior.

Canadians did not make their lives easy. Yet they prevailed, and have contributed to our Nation.

jb

Title: Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
Post by: Sap1 on August 24, 2016, 11:57:53 AM
Canadian history is definitely a dark place JB.

I should have said early Anglo's and the early French. Since that dark period of Canadian history, subsequent offspring down the line have learned from the mistakes.

Yes, the Japanese who were settled here and had assets of businesses, houses, etc lost everything. I failed to  mention all those affected, yet they carried on and persevered. That is all they could do and did very well eventually.

That brings me to my thoughts on the whole "reservation" thing. I believe strongly that reserves need to be disbanded and people integrated finally after all these years. It is quite evident that a lot of money flows into the bands but  somehow does not reach those in need and they live in squallor. This is not acceptable on so many levels. We have seen what ex-Chief Theresa Spence (Attawapiscat) and her little crew has done. There are more reserves where the funds are milked by a select few, leaving many others in poverty. Integrating them into society, providing education among many other things (including mental health issues) will give them hope and in the long run should be saving the Feds money.

Back some years, mid 1990's, then MLA (PC) Mike Cardinal was improving life for Metis/Aboriginal colonies in the north. There was a program whereby all those living on social assistance were tested, educated and provisions made in the north of a "natives first" policy. Those who didn't make the grade during testing were given tasks around their community, such as care aids for the elders who needed daily assistance, etc. Others studied Social Work and other professions. It was effective to some degree.   

Title: Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
Post by: jellybean on August 24, 2016, 12:22:42 PM
Quote
Back some years, mid 1990's, then MLA (PC) Mike Cardinal was improving life for Metis/Aboriginal colonies in the north. There was a program whereby all those living on social assistance were tested, educated and provisions made in the north of a "natives first" policy. Those who didn't make the grade during testing were given tasks around their community, such as care aids for the elders who needed daily assistance, etc. Others studied Social Work and other professions. It was effective to some degree.

Whatever happened to that program?  Did it fizzle out too?  Think of "Idle No More" - it went Idle alright!!

The only hope they have for positive and permanent change is through the AFN   Too many groups forming to get the public's attention, is confusing and counter productive - as we Canadians get pooped out and will stop listening.

jb
Title: Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
Post by: Sap1 on August 24, 2016, 12:52:01 PM
There was a better article on the Net but can't find it now. This makes mentions to Mike Cardinal's similar program for Calling Lake area, which was the same program used for Buffalo Lake Metis (Caslan Ab east of Boyle Ab).

Different programs were brokered out and suitable candidates hired to teach the Licensed Practical Nurse program which helped many people in the north. Not sure if the RN program was also introduced the same way but there were talks at one time.

Natives first policy has been established some years ago as well, so any northern school such as LacLaBiche, took natives first for upgrading. Subsequently further education did as well and from there on, companies like Grasslands pulp and paper mill (AlPac) also hired natives first if they had the education. Getting into AlPac is the great dream for many ... top wages and benefits galore.


https://archive.org/stream/northernperspect00nort/northernperspect00nort_djvu.txt

Excerpt:

Mr. Cardinal outlined the way his home town of Calling
Lake identified and rectified its key problems. The
community found the two major impediments to be a
welfare system that did not work, and a need for job
creation and training. The resulting action plan
concentrated on:

• obtaining a community administrator

• job creation and training

• local government reform

• welfare reform

The community managed to increase timber quotas,
opened a small fish plant, reviewed training programs,
joined the Athabasca Regional Development Council and
the FCSS, and worked for a road network to link itself to
other parts of the province.

“The community along with the municipality did all the
planning,” Mr. Cardinal said. “Selection of plans,
monitoring the project, choosing the contractor and
supplying the labor - they did it all.”


The community also devised a long-range plan to
determine the development and management of the lakes.
They met with local employers to encourage local hiring,
to discuss problems, and to ensure some job security.

Mr. Cardinal said, “The results [of all the work and
planning] were that the majority of community members
returned to work for training programs; crime dropped
drastically; social problems, like alcoholism, dropped and
general positive change in attitude resulted.”

He believes some of the success of Calling Lake’s
experience resulted because:

• The community was ready for it.

• Federal and provincial governments acted only as
facilitators.

• Native organizations supported it.

Scarcity of job opportunities he sees as the negative side
of the program.

In the future, Mr. Cardinal looks to diversification and
suggests that government should make sure it is aimed at
areas that are not thriving.
Title: Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
Post by: jellybean on August 24, 2016, 03:56:07 PM
This is a very long article written two years ago in the Globe and Mail. Well worth the read.
I will say that this reserve is BC, it is not up north - but this reserve is successful and thriving.
Brought from poverty to prosperity.

This is how it was accomplished;

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/rob-magazine/clarence-louie-feature/article18913980/

The Osoyoos Indian Band is arguably the most business-minded First Nation in Canada.
So what’s the secret to their success?

The first thing that strikes you about the Osoyoos Indian Band is the postcard setting of its reserve. Deep in British Columbia’s southern Okanagan, it’s surrounded by weathered mountains and mirrored lakes. This is the hottest and driest part of Canada, a northern extension of the Sonoran Desert, where rattlesnakes inhabit sagebrush canyons and noonday summer temperatures can hit 38 C.


The Osoyoos Indian Reserve, in British Columbia's southern Okanagan, spans some 32,000 acres.

The second striking thing about the Osoyoos Indian Band is that it’s not poor. In fact, it’s arguably the most prosperous First Nation in Canada, with virtually no unemployment among the band’s 520 members. Job-seekers from elsewhere flock in to work at the band’s businesses, which last year saw $26 million in revenue and $2.5 million in net profits. Meanwhile, the reserve’s impressive school teaches native heritage and the Okanagan language.

The third singular thing about the Osoyoos Indian Band is its hard-ass leader, Chief Clarence Louie. If you ask for an appointment, he sets the tone right off the top. “Be here at 9 o’clock sharp,” he texts. “No Indian time.”


The remark is typical. The curt, outspoken chief has been known to scold other aboriginal leaders who drift into meetings a few minutes late with coffee cups in hand. Louie doesn’t have time for diplomacy or political niceties. He makes it clear to everyone he meets that he expects them to either lead, follow or get out of the way.

[snippets]

When Louie became chief in 1984, the land wasn’t being used to generate much in the way of jobs or wealth. The band was operating a campground and a vineyard but both were sloppily managed and in debt. Apart from government transfer payments, the only other income came from nickel-and-dime lease arrangements with non-native farmers and small businesses.

 “The band was insolvent and under third-party management,” he says. “We recognized that we needed outside help.”

He took advantage of a federal/provincial program called Industrial Adjustment Services, designed to help communities gain the skills required to run successful businesses. With the help of an experienced IAS “white guy” named Dave Sutherland, Louie introduced strict financial controls and accountability measures, some of which were unpopular with band members accustomed to the casual rules of earlier business ventures. “Mismanagement and general incompetence are big problems on the Canadian rez,” he says. “We wanted to let people know those days were over.”

The community launched a vision quest that sought to involve all the band members in a long-term development plan. The search arrived at an ambitious goal—total economic self-sufficiency by 2005. It seemed like a pipe dream—only a few band members were employed, and the rest of the labour pool were lacking in basic education, job skills and work ethic. “Outside experts like Sutherland helped us to get people trained,” Louie says. “Some of our people needed a pat on the back and some needed a kick in the butt. A hundred years of enforced dependency had broken our tradition of hard work and independence.”

Louie and his band councillors usually get most of the credit for turning his community around, but it’s unlikely they could have done it without partnerships with the outside business community. One of Louie’s key team members was another “white guy” named Chris Scott, who offered to help the band build a clean, streamlined corporate structure based on proven practices and personal accountability. Scott, who had built a successful fruit company in the Okanagan, didn’t need the work; he was motivated by a desire to help.

He wasn’t exactly greeted with open arms. “Some of the people on the reserve were understandably mistrusting of white men in neckties, and others were just opposed to any change of any kind.

Ronny McGinnis, who has been married to Joe McGinnis for 33 years, recalls that when Louie and Scott negotiated a pipeline lease deal, there was tremendous pressure to parcel out the resulting income in per-capita payments to band members. “People wanted to buy new cars and whatever with the money and we were determined to reinvest it for the future of the community,” McGinnis says. “Well, I thought we wouldn’t live to see the end of the week. We were accused of stealing the money and everything else. But we had this new policy of transparency, so we could say to everyone, ‘Come and see the books.’ People were really mad, but when they saw the eventual benefits, they became believers.”

Meanwhile, Louie was busily educating himself on the workings of the outside economy. (“I think he’s read just about every business book ever published,” Scott says.) In 1995 the Osoyoos Indian Band bought out the lease on the Cherry Grove Golf Course and took over its management. Embarking on an aggressive expansion, it invested $2 million of band funds in the project, and renamed it the Nk’Mip Canyon Desert Golf Course, gambling that a world-class 18-hole course would draw traffic to the band’s other businesses, such as a neighbouring trailer park and condos. The band also asserted control over the taxation of non-native companies leasing land on the reserve—taxes formerly scooped by the province. It was a small initiative, but it added $750,000 in annual revenue.

and - By the same token, it’s obvious that most reserves are less naturally endowed than Osoyoos. No one is going to build a resort at Pikangikum or Shamattawa, where sexual assault, suicide and substance abuse define everyday life. But Louie says that every reserve has its own unique potential, and with accelerating development in the North, many First Nations are well-positioned to partner up with outside companies. “You have to exploit whatever potential there is in the area. If you are on the coast, it’s trees and fish. If you are up north, it’s mining and forestry. For us, it’s agriculture and tourism. You let your natural resources tell you what business you’re in.”

the article continues ....
jb
Title: Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
Post by: Sap1 on August 24, 2016, 06:36:20 PM
And herein lies the problems with other reserves ... They are so accustomed to payouts from government sources, for so long that change would not come easy. It can be done! Is Chief Louie actually blaming anyone? NO! He realized the problem and tackled it.

Quote
“Some of our people needed a pat on the back and some needed a kick in the butt. A hundred years of enforced dependency had broken our tradition of hard work and independence.”

Louie and his band councillors usually get most of the credit for turning his community around, but it’s unlikely they could have done it without partnerships with the outside business community. One of Louie’s key team members was another “white guy” named Chris Scott, who offered to help the band build a clean, streamlined corporate structure based on proven practices and personal accountability. Scott, who had built a successful fruit company in the Okanagan, didn’t need the work; he was motivated by a desire to help.

He wasn’t exactly greeted with open arms. “Some of the people on the reserve were understandably mistrusting of white men in neckties, and others were just opposed to any change of any kind.

Ronny McGinnis, who has been married to Joe McGinnis for 33 years, recalls that when Louie and Scott negotiated a pipeline lease deal, [b]there was tremendous pressure to parcel out the resulting income in per-capita payments to band members. “People wanted to buy new cars and whatever with the money and we were determined to reinvest it for the future of the community,[/b]” McGinnis says. “Well, I thought we wouldn’t live to see the end of the week. We were accused of stealing the money and everything else. But we had this new policy of transparency, so we could say to everyone, ‘Come and see the books.’ People were really mad, but when they saw the eventual benefits, they became believers.”
Title: Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
Post by: Sap1 on August 25, 2016, 01:50:46 PM
This man, many years ago, besides all of his other many accomplishments, ran a talk show on radio in Edmonton. One thing especially I remember him saying was that the aboriginal population totally missed the industrial revolution.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kiviaq_(lawyer)

What would have happened if fur traders, prospectors, farmers, etc had not come to this land? So many countries contend with migration starting from the biblical days and forever more. It is what happens. Atrocities happen everywhere. They shouldn't but they do. It is life. I am trying to imagine this country the way it was back then had not any other country man set foot here. With increasing populations the hunting would have ended due to animal extinction. Nature has a way of culling as well ... diseases, etc.
 
Title: Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
Post by: Sap1 on August 25, 2016, 02:22:04 PM
Driftpile Alberta. If you are driving along #2 highway northern Alberta, and you blink, you will miss the sign that says Driftpile and may never know you were even there. It is Cree nation land.

Every year they hold North Country Fair in this area. Entertainers come from across Canada and the north, many of whom are aboriginal entertainers.
Apparently they are living in the moment, and not in the past. How wonderful they must feel to be free of past memories that others live in wearing them down. Kudos to all these who can move forward despite hardships from years past.

http://www.festivalseekers.com/abnorth/northcountryfair
Title: Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
Post by: jellybean on August 25, 2016, 04:09:46 PM
While it takes a lot of hunting and pecking to find a reserve that I would like to visit. There is hope!

Here is another reserve that is working hard to have it  "all together":

Constance Lake, in Ontario.
http://www.clfn.on.ca/default.asp?pgid=6

The Economic Development Program has played a role in most of the community’s development projects.

Power Generation Projects

Mining & Exploration

Forestry & Bio-Mass

Internet Broadband project

Title: Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
Post by: Sap1 on August 26, 2016, 02:28:42 AM
Following is an interesting article. Note the blue below ... I recall ex-Chief Theresa Spence complaining not that long ago, that the diamond mines do not hire FN peoples.

 http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/how-does-native-funding-work-1.1301120

Excerpts:

How do First Nations' earn own-source revenue?

In 1876, the Indian Act gave the government control of Indian economic and resource development and land use. They became what Calla calls "wards of Canada," which didn't allow them to engage in economic development. Only in the last few decades has there been any significant change in that arrangement.

si-300-air-north-737-200-combi
Vuntut Gwitchen First Nation in the Yukon earns revenue through its co-ownership of Air North. (CBC)

Now that they are able to do so, many First Nations are generating revenue, from a wide variety of sources. Here are some examples:

Squamish First Nation in North Vancouver and Westbank First Nation in Kelowna, B.C., have developed major shopping centres.
Osoyoos First Nation in B.C. has a winery, NK'Mip Cellars.
Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation in the Yukon owns the Vuntut Development Corp., which co-owns Air North airline and other interests.
Tlicho First Nations north of Yellowknife provides support services to the diamond mining industry, and also receives royalties from the mining companies.
Whitecap Dakota First Nation in Saskatchewan has the Dakota Dunes Casino and the Chippewas of Rama First Nation in Ontario have Casino Rama. There are at least 15 other First Nation-owned casinos in Canada.
Lac La Ronge First Nation's Northern Lights Foods sells wild rice and mushrooms internationally.
Attawapiskat First Nation in Ontario receives funds, as well as training and jobs, from De Beers' diamond mine on their traditional land, the result of an impact benefit agreement the two sides reached in 2005.
Waswanipi Cree First Nation in Quebec has a silvaculture and timber harvest joint venture with Domtar.
Membertou First Nation in Nova Scotia has a hotel and convention centre.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

What happens when outside corporations develop resources on aboriginal land?

Often there's a lawsuit, and 90 per cent of the time, the Aboriginal group wins, according to Bill Gallagher, a lawyer who worked for the federal government as a treaty land entitlement officer on the Prairies. He later worked for Inco in the protracted negotiations over the Voisey's Bay project in Labrador.

Gallagher says aboriginal groups have recorded victories in 175 lawsuits since the mid-'80s – including five victories while Attawapiskat chief Theresa Spence was on her hunger strike. Most of the victories concern development on traditional rather than reserve lands.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Title: Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
Post by: debbiec on August 26, 2016, 10:01:03 AM
Sap1:
Quote
Following is an interesting article. Note the blue below ... I recall ex-Chief Theresa Spence complaining not that long ago, that the diamond mines do not hire FN peoples.
and...
Quote
Attawapiskat First Nation in Ontario receives funds, as well as training and jobs, from De Beers' diamond mine on their traditional land, the result of an impact benefit agreement the two sides reached in 2005.[color]


I have re-posted an article below which I had originally posted on the Attawapiskat thread (page 11, reply # 158). It is a long, but very interesting read. As I said the first time, it makes me shake my head.


Jonathan Kay: Attawapiskat protestors hurting First Nations with lawless blockade of De Beers mine
Jonathan Kay | Feb 21, 2013 9:20 PM ET | Last Updated: Feb 21, 2013 10:40 PM ET


Canadian politicians and First Nations leaders all agree that economic development will be critical for raising the living standards of Canada’s native population. In many cases, this will mean bringing large, multinational corporations onto traditional native lands — because only these companies have the resources and expertise necessary to develop mines and other capital-extensive resource-extraction operations.

Unfortunately, as the example of Attawapiskat shows, the situation in and around many reserves actively repels that kind of investment.

Large, risk-averse companies won’t invest in areas of the country where the local population doesn’t respect Canadian laws — or even obey local band chiefs. Militant native protesters in these areas may think they’re striking a blow for economic empowerment. But all they’re really doing is reinforcing the stereotype that native tribes aren’t responsible business partners.


The De Beers Victor Mine, located in the lowlands 90 km west of the James Bay Cree community of Attawapiskat, cost $1-billion to create. Before a single diamond particle was extracted, the company negotiated impact benefit agreements (IBAs) with four local communities — including Attawapiskat. The details of the IBAs are confidential, but the company has publicly declared that “since the start of construction, over $360-million in contracts have been awarded to solely owned or joint venture companies run by [Attawapiskat]. In 2012, contracts awarded to the community were over $40-million. To build capacity within the community, two training facilities have been constructed in the community at a combined cost of almost $2-million. We currently employ over 60 full-time employees from the community, and over 100 from other First Nations.”

In addition to providing all of this employment, infrastructure and money, De Beers operates the 250 km ice road running from the town of Moosonee at the southern tip of James Bay all the way up to Attawapiskat — a massive engineering undertaking that provides three months of car access to communities that are otherwise fly-in dots on the map.

I drove the ice road last month and was shocked by how much manpower and heavy equipment is required to keep it operational. (Jobs on the ice road are in high demand — and the lucky men who get them often flaunt their specialized jackets as status symbols even when they’re off-duty.)

De Beers doesn’t do this out of the goodness of its corporate heart. It does it because it wants to operate a profitable diamond mine — and the ice road is an essential means to deliver fuel and heavy equipment that can’t be brought in by air. This is how it justifies the cost of the ice road and the multi-million-dollar IBAs to its shareholders.

The whole point of signing these agreements is to define the obligations of each side in concrete terms. For the Attawapiskat side, that means providing safe, unimpeded access to the Victor Mine along the ice road that De Beers itself builds and maintains. Yet for weeks, protestors from four local families have been staging an on-again/off-again blockade of the 90 km spur that leads from the main Moosonee-Attawapiskat ice road to the Victor Mine. This could compromise mine operations for a whole year, since the company only has a narrow time window to deliver supplies before the ice road melts in late March or early April.

According to an APTN report, the protestors seem to be freelancers — locals from Attawapiskat who are upset with De Beers for “a number of grievances ranging from personal, past employment and pay issues with De Beers, to the lack of housing in the community, the need for compensation over the loss of traditional traplines and burial sites along with overarching environmental issues.”

It’s unclear whether they are acting with the support of Chief Theresa Spence. But the band certainly isn’t doing anything to apprehend or discourage the protestors. That raises the question of whether it’s worth it for companies to enter into IBAs with bands — especially those, such as Attawapiskat, with dysfunctional leadership — in the first place. If any hothead can go out and close down the ice road, what are all those millions buying?

Other aspects of De Beers’ experience in Attawapiskat raise questions as well. During my visit there in January, it became obvious to me that the company’s humanitarian mission in the community is open-ended. The trailers that were provided by the company in 2009 to remedy an emergency housing crisis, for instance, represented an act of charity. In coming months, De Beers will be replacing the trailers with more modern units — also at company expense, outside the parameters of the IBA. The company provides the schools with textbooks, and also has become Attawapiskat’s de facto unpaid lobbyist in Ottawa.

This is the sort of lawless behaviour that one expects in places such as, say, Nigeria, where Western companies actually budget for such shakedowns

Given that De Beers essentially has taken on the role of the welfare state in Attawapiskat, perhaps the blockades shouldn’t come as a surprise: Since the company has been generous in the past, it’s not surprising that protestors are looking to see how far they can push things. No doubt, they’re banking on the knowledge that the easiest course for De Beers would be simply to render payment, in some respectably veiled fashion, to whoever can credibly promise to stop the protests.

This is the sort of lawless behaviour that one expects in places such as, say, Nigeria, where Western companies actually budget for such shakedowns. And it’s appalling that it would be tolerated on Canadian soil.

On Wednesday, a judge in Timmins, Ont., said as much when he declared that the protestors were “individuals with private financial interests, holding a large multinational corporation to ransom … It smells of coercion.” According to a Timmins Daily Press account, Judge Robert Riopelle also “felt there was sufficient basis for the Ontario Provincial Police to lay criminal charges against the six demonstrators who have prevented access to the mine site.”

But as at Caledonia and numerous other “protest” sites in recent years, the Ontario Provincial Police have done nothing. At Wednesday’s hearing in Timmins, an OPP lawyer claimed that the police force must remain neutral and embrace a “measured approach” — even in the face of an explicit Feb. 15 court injunction demanding that De Beers have access to the ice road. At this, Neal Smitheman, the lawyer representing De Beers, understandably responded with exasperation. “What is the message being sent to the world,” he asked, when “five or six disgruntled ex-employees … can shut down a business of 500 people at a cost of millions? That there is no law in Northern Ontario.”

The immediate victim of this lawlessness is De Beers. But in the long run, it will be natives themselves. Businesses simply won’t operate in places where contracts aren’t respected and courts orders are flouted.

National Post

http://fullcomment.nationalpost.com/2013/02/21/jonathan-kay-natives-hurting-themselves-with-lawless-blockade-of-de-beers-mine
Title: Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
Post by: Sap1 on August 26, 2016, 11:11:52 AM
I just don't know what to say! So much is swirling in my head. I suppose the then Chief Theresa Spence was on her hungerless strike in Ottawa, sitting in her luxury SUV watching TV screens on each headrest, while her people were shutting down travel to the mines.
There is absolutely millions flowing into Attawapiskat and half the population is living in rotting drafty housing. There is very little for the children outside of education, if they even get that. Recently there were between 7 to 9 attempted suicides of very young people in Attawapiskat. These millions could easily build a rec centre and hockey arena and give the young a little something to look forward to.

Never mind what the Anglo's and French did way back in the 1800's and on, what are these band leaders doing to their own people??!!
They just keep chewing and biting off the hands that feed them! To what end?

eta: There were 11 recent suicide attempts. They still need housing and then more counsellors and healthcare staff but there is no housing for more people. The new Chief claims there are a number of factors ... including problems stemming from residential schools.

Let there be very detailed counselling for survivors of residential schools and for a very long period so that they may heal. I am all for that kind of assistance. Let the counseling  also extend to all the offspring.
Perhaps outside help can be brought in to help deal with and get over past traumas ... by that I mean survivors of Hitler's regime. I am serious. We don't hear them crying over what happened ions ago. They picked up and rebuilt their lives all over the world because in order to survive they had to. There was  no government they could hold ransom for money. There is a set amount that Germany still pays out but there is no demanding for more and more.

http://globalnews.ca/news/2631313/attawapiskat-chief-says-hes-homeless-needs-more-resources-after-spike-in-suicide-attempts/
Title: Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
Post by: jellybean on August 26, 2016, 11:56:48 AM
Quote
from Attawaskat thread
Leaders in the  Nskantaga, community, which lies in Ontario’s remote James Bay lowlands about 480 kilometres northeast of Thunder Bay, say pressures from nearby mining development are contributing to the problems.

About 400 people live in Neskantaga, and a recent health report said about half of them struggle with addictions — three quarters them younger people.

That leaves about a handful of employable adults to help grief-stricken family members and do all the other jobs in the community.
A First Nations leader in the region said meeting the demands of the burgeoning mining industry is only adding to Neskantaga's misery.

“It’s just a lot of pressure, I think, from the outside,” Nishnawbe Aski Nation Deputy Grand Chief Alvin Fiddler said, “as well as trying to deal with what's happening right in their community.”

A lot of pressure?  Get  after the booze runners, and kick them off of the reserve.  I mean those people who supply it. It might be a start.
At least those few employables can find and attend work, rather than baby sitting. It is not being fair to them.  These are natives who have hope, who may have a chance.
We know that alcohol is a depressant, and often results in suicide. 
This is not solely a native condition either.

I bring up the following reserve who are making a difference.

Constance Lake, in Ontario.
http://www.clfn.on.ca/default.asp?pgid=6
 


jb
Title: Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
Post by: Sap1 on August 26, 2016, 12:35:52 PM
Unfortunately there are those who do not want outside help (interference). I have heard countless recounts of teachers and others employed by different reserves what a constant struggle they had with students who didn't want them there. Several years ago one teacher was shot (and left paralyzed for the rest of his life) by a student. A young family man. Yet the booze runners seem welcomed!

What does all this have to do with the expensive MMIW? Everything! It is past time to look inward not outward.
Title: Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
Post by: Sap1 on August 30, 2016, 01:11:42 AM
It was not my intention to monopolize this thread with my opinions and complaints. :) All opinions and reactions are most welcome. I want you all to know that the comments I make are not from a racist mind. Just would like the truth like everyone else, and reading around in different articles I see different views from survivors themselves. Some were happy to get the education offered them so they could go on to Universities and many did. Others found it quite a hardship and have memories that produced demons in their minds.

I am not proud of what forefathers did here in Canada! Was there not another option, rather than segregating the initial people of the land, and then tearing their children away from them to go to residential schools? What is the worst is the sexual abuse at the hands of religious leaders and I believe this destroyed many lives. I believe Harper apologized although he had no hand in the barbarianism. Did any religious affiliations ever apologize? What good is an apology except to acknowledge the people? 
Title: Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
Post by: Sap1 on September 12, 2016, 12:36:57 PM
So there may be another inquiry following this present inquiry? To not confuse the issues, missing and murdered aboriginal males will not be done along with this inquiry so as not to confuse the separate issues. One thing they all specify as the root problem being early colonialization. We all know it already so now is the time to do something about the fall-out. Re-education? Or send us all back to Europe and totally return this country to its' pre-industrial state?

I, for one, would have been happier had my parents decided to stay in Europe.

The bottom line about "blaming" the foreigners is that violence will continue and racism will even get worse with all the feelings this provokes. The only way to stop the violence is ACCOUNTABILITY for one's own actions. There are many that rose above the hardships of residential schools.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/national-inquiry-should-not-study-violence-against-aboriginal-men-experts/article28498467/

The federal government should not study the alarming rate of violence against aboriginal men as part of its upcoming national inquiry into Canada’s missing and murdered indigenous women, international human-rights experts caution, saying that doing so would confuse the issue.

Speaking at a news conference in Ottawa on Monday, the vice-chair of the United Nations Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women said the plight of indigenous women and girls is distinct and should be treated as such. “If we attempt to combine, it’s going to really … muddy the waters,” said Barbara Bailey, who was on the UN team that visited Canada in 2013 to investigate the violence. “I think to detract now would really be a tragedy. Let’s fix that problem first and then we can begin to see what else is out there.”

Aboriginal people are six times more likely than non-aboriginal people to be homicide victims, according to Statistics Canada data released in the fall. The disproportionality is even more pronounced among indigenous men. That reality has led to some difficult questions about why the public inquiry is slated to focus on women, especially since many of the oft-cited underlying social ills – colonialism, the legacy of the Indian residential school system, addiction, unemployment, poor housing, poverty and racism – affect aboriginal men and women alike.


Indigenous Affairs Minister Carolyn Bennett told The Globe and Mail in November that the inquiry will centre on women because of the “tremendous call and consensus” to do so. “Our mandate now is to get to the bottom of the tragedy of missing and murdered indigenous women and girls in Canada,” she said. “The issues around sexism are specific.” She also said she believes all aboriginal people will benefit from the inquiry. In an e-mail Monday, a spokeswoman for Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada reiterated that there has been a “specific and ongoing” plea from domestic and international bodies to address the crisis of missing and murdered aboriginal women.

The Liberal government has promised to launch the probe by summer and has pledged, in the meantime, to listen to victims’ families and indigenous organizations about the design of the inquiry – including its scope. According to summaries of seven consultation sessions posted to a government website, the desire to dedicate some attention to violence against indigenous men and boys has come up at four of the meetings.

“It’s a really hard conversation to have,” said Dawn Lavell-Harvard, the president of the Native Women’s Association of Canada. She believes the inquiry should specifically address women because they experience the “double discrimination” that comes with being indigenous and female. “Absolutely [men] deserve the same amount of attention, just not necessarily in the same forum,” she said, adding that the inquiry must examine sexual violence and exploitation.

Ms. Bailey and other representatives from the UN and the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights were in Ottawa for a weekend symposium on missing and murdered aboriginal women. They also met with the ministers of justice, indigenous affairs and status of women to discuss the inquiry. James Cavallarro, president of the IACHR, agreed the inquiry should focus on women, in part because its commissioners could look to several existing studies on that issue as a starting point.

The experts spoke from Parliament Hill the morning after Prime Minister Justin Trudeau told a victim’s relative during a CBC forum that “indigenous lives matter.” Asked about racism within the RCMP, Mr. Trudeau said “there are big changes to make, institutionally, right across the board – the RCMP is part of it, but the culture of politics and government is a big part of it as well.”
Title: Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
Post by: Sap1 on February 19, 2017, 04:26:43 PM
W5 ran a segment that was rather shocking this past week. Ths was some time ago so it must be a W5 rerun.

Any aboriginals who had claims towards the Inquiry needed to have a lawyer and some of those lawyers were very good liars. It happened in Calgary and also down east Toronto I believe. The lawyers were signing people up like hoards, taking their money and promising financial returns. One man had to wait several months and when his money came, the lawyers had already taken a chunk of 41,000. dollars from just one man after he had already paid a retainer. Hundreds of other claimants saw nothing and there is no trail of their paperwork. Their money is also gone. The lawyer was tracked and so far has returned with that he has done nothing wrong. Huh? I believe it is all still under investigation by the college but by the time they finish, the lawyer could be already out of reach on some Island in Bahamas.

Lawyer was disbarred and there is still a class action lawsuit on-going:

http://www.canadianlawyermag.com/legalfeeds/2141/calgary-lawyer-being-sued-by-residential-school-survivors-disbarred.html

A Calgary lawyer being sued by residential school survivors has been disbarred by the Law Society of Alberta and is prohibited from practising law in the province following his resignation last week.

The Law Society of Alberta approved David Blott’s application for resignation June 13. He was suspended in May for failing to pay his annual dues for 2014-2015.

Blott was investigated by the LSA for allegations of misconduct related to his representation of clients in the Independent Assessment Process — the process of applying for compensation through the Indian Residential School Settlement Agreement.

In April 2012, the law society imposed restrictions on Blott’s ability to practise law and took steps to ensure his clients were served by other lawyers.

According to an LSA, his disbarment allows his former clients to avoid enduring the “additional stress of testifying in a formal hearing,” which could require up to two more years of process.

As previously reported by Legal Feeds in June 2012, the British Columbia Supreme Court appointed retired Supreme Court justice Ian Pitifield to oversee the transfer of the residential schools victims to new lawyers following a critical review of Blott’s firm Blott & Co.’s practices.

Justice Brenda Brown banned Blott and his firm from continuing to represent residential schools victims in the independent assessment process stemming from the residential schools settlement.

A court monitor looking into the firm’s practice found that 77 Blott claimants received more than 380 loans from various lenders against their settlement. Taking all fees and interest into account, 73 per cent of the loans from one lender exceeded the criminal rate of 60 per cent per year, according to the monitor’s report found.

Another major area of concern related to the involvement of Honour Walk Ltd., a company that provided “form-filler” services in relation to Blott & Co.’s residential schools practice.

According to a post on the Blood Tribe web site, a number of residential school survivors from the Blood reserve located south of Calgary are involved in a class-action lawsuit against Blott and other lawyers.

On Oct. 23 last year, three members of the Blood Tribe — Doris Bird, Andrew Bull Calf, and Tyrone Weasel Head — launched the class action lawsuit against Blott, his law firm and various people in relation to what they allege was “negligent representation. It has yet to be certified. The lawsuit claims Blott and others received more than $14.5 million in compensation through representation of the claimants.

The claim alleges Blott was paid substantial fees — usually equivalent to some 25-30 per cent of the claimants’ settlement amounts. Blott has reportedly denied all allegations.

The defendants also allege Blott signed up more than 5,600 claimants, “without any regard to their ability to properly discharge their professional duties toward these individuals.”

Counsel for Blott said they had no comment on the matter.
 
Title: Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
Post by: jellybean on June 25, 2017, 06:39:46 PM
https://newjourneys.ca/en/articles/red-dress-a-song-about-missing-and-murdered-indigenous-women

The Red Dress Song. 

APRIL 01, 2016
SHARE THIS   
Amanda Rheaume is a Métis singer based in Ottawa. She’s made a name for herself in the Canadian music world with her personal, powerful folk/roots music. Her last album, Keep a Fire, was released in 2013 and was nominated for best Aboriginal album of the year at the Junos in 2014.

Rheaume cares deeply about missing and murdered Indigenous women and just released Red Dress, a song meant to raise awareness about the issue and raise money for the Native Women's Association of Canada. She shared some thoughts with New Journeys about Red Dress, the song’s compelling music video and how music can be a part of healing.

Hear her sing - (video)

JB
Title: Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
Post by: Sap1 on June 28, 2017, 07:24:57 PM
We all care deeply regarding the missing and murdered and that is why we talk about safety and not going the route of risky behavior. Why are so many girls still hitchhiking these days when there are so many who have gone missing doing that very thing.

Another beautiful soul missing while hitch hiking from Toronto to NS. If she is not found safe or found at all, she becomes a statistic number.

 http://www.unsolvedcanada.ca/index.php?topic=7965.msg123423;topicseen#msg123423
Title: Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
Post by: capeheart on June 30, 2017, 06:25:49 PM
She has been found safe, there is a thread on here for her and I just read it. A risky way to get back to Cape Breton, but she made it. Glad she is safe. :D :D :D :D :D :D
Title: Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
Post by: Sap1 on February 13, 2018, 01:35:10 AM
A true trailblazer who let nothing stop him, not even the horrid residential schools. A fair and square lawyer in his day.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/indigenous/remembering-bill-wuttunee-1.3300662

William (Bill) Wuttunee was a man before his time. He died Fri. Oct. 30, leaving a trail that was both controversial and prescient.

Wuttunee was born May 8, 1928 on the Red Pheasant First Nation, located south of North Battleford, Sask. The reserve had a day school for the earlier grades but he had to attend residential school in Onion Lake to complete his high school.

He graduated from the University of Saskatchewan in 1954, becoming Western Canada's first status Indian lawyer at a time when most reserves had no electricity, people lived in log homes and horses were the chief means of transportation. His people were beginning a period of rapid change that would be for both better and worse.

Wuttunee was a family friend ? our families are related, although distantly. He and my dad were contemporaries who worked together to lay the foundation for the modern Federation of Saskatchewan Indians. In 1956 the leaders gathered in Fort Qu'Appelle and developed the constitution and bylaws for the federation.

Later he would work on the national level and assist in the creation of the Native Council of Canada, which evolved into the Congress of Aboriginal Peoples.

In the early 1960s he decided to concentrate on his law career and he set up a law office in Calgary. For years he practised law, later setting up a branch office in Yellowknife.

I recall the Sarcee band owed a company money and Wuttunee sued Sarcee on behalf of that company. It was considered an act of betrayal at the time. But he showed that everyone had to pay their bills and First Nations couldn't hide behind the Indian Act.

Wuttunee was also a bit of a free thinker and he publicly disagreed with the Indian Association of Alberta, in particular the organization's leader, Harold Cardinal. He felt that too much emphasis was being placed on the treaties and not enough on individual initiative.

Ruffled Feathers, William Wuttunee
William Wuttunee was a strong proponent of integration. It was the topic of his book, Ruffled Feathers, published in 1971. (Bell Books)

He was a strong proponent of integration. It was the topic of his book, Ruffled Feathers, published in 1971. It was met with scorn and derision by First Nations leaders at the time.

In retrospect, differing points of view are needed for the creation of democratic First Nations communities. His book, though now largely forgotten, was a model for other writers who would speak their mind and be critical of their people.

Gradually he reunited with his people and became accepted by the younger generation. When the first group of aboriginal lawyers set up the indigenous bar association he was invited to join.

Later, when the Truth and Reconciliation Commission was set up, he played the role of elder advisor and was one of the architects of the process.

He told his story of his days at residential school and the brutality and pain that many students suffered. He spoke of experiences that he had previously not shared with his family.

By now his life had come full circle. He was respected for his work and acknowledged as a trailblazer. And he had seen the members of his profession grow to a community of over 2,000 indigenous lawyers.

Bill Wuttunee died last Friday, at age 87, and began his next journey.

   
Title: Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
Post by: capeheart on February 13, 2018, 12:57:52 PM
It just seems recently that there are a lot of inquiries into the missing persons and the MMIW Inquiry. There are thousands of people missing in Canada, not just indigenous persons. We feel sorry for the famlies of those who have gone missing, but sometimes it is because of a life style and risks they take in certain activities and that goes with whatever gender you happen to be. I am kind of tired of hearing about hearing the word
"discrimination". Just yesterday here in Nova Scotia there was a young woman of Muslim faith who was very disenchanted because a hotel in Halifax could not prepare a meal she was wanting at her reception.  She cried the word "discrimination" and said it on national TV. I was very angry by her comments. That catering at the hotel could not prepare a meal of her wishes and was very angry. She even wanted to have another caterer brought in, of course the hotel refused. Then she was angry because it would cost her more money to have the function elsewhere for 200 people. Well lady, that is not our problem. If you don't like it here in Canada, go back to your homeland and have your wedding feast. The gall of her coming on TV and crying discrimination. I was so angry that I could have strangled her if she was in front of my office and making plans for a wedding reception. If any of us went over to Egypt or somewhere and said, oh, we'd like to have a boiled dinner, with cabbage and salt meat and the whole deal, I wonder what they'd tell us. Or if we wanted fish cakes and bologna or home made baked beans with molasses and I guess we'd get the boot pretty quick.  When people blame others for the trivia crap they go on with, it's disgusting. Canadians have opened their hearts to many immigrants that came over recently and year after year. They have spent millions of our tax payers dollars to feed, cloth and house others. They have come here and were made citizens. They were given Child Credit cheques for their children. They were given Old Age Security cheques and not only that, they were given settlement cheques of a great deal of money, that was not disclosed to Canadians before they came over here. We don't have much say in it, if Trudeau is spending the money, we just have to say okay. So the next election, that will be how we turn him off.

Now just another note on the ongoing discussion related to the recent tragedy in Saskatchewan.  We all feel bad that a young person lost his life. We try to look at both sides of the story and put ourselves in the position of the property owner. It is a situation that turned out badly.  I just want to add that these young people had a choice that day and it was a bad one.  I also want to add that every one of these young people have an opportunity to get an education, there is all kinds of funding for native youth to go to college, be anything they want, to get an education and get a trade.  Right next door to me is a friend that lives with my neighbor. His ex is a native. He has a daughter and she is of native status.  This young lady, a very sweet person and I really like her, she is going to Social Work College in another town.  She is getting $800.00 a month towards her rent; $350.00 every two weeks for expenses; she has her own car and is talking about getting a new one.  She is only 21 years old and is making something for her future.  She was not a lazy person and neither was her sister, they worked at a B&B all summer before they went to take a course.  They also did other jobs like working in a store.  That is just all I am saying, there are great opportunities, they are there and they must start taking advantage of the things that are available to make a better life.

To make a long story short, STOP BLAMING EVERYONE ELSE FOR YOUR FAILURES. THAT INCLUDES ANY PERSON IN CANADA, IMMIGRANTS WHO HAVE COME HERE, ORDINARY PEOPLE, WE ARE ALL ORDINARY PEOPLE, NO MATTER WHAT COLOR WE ARE, WHAT JOB WE DO, WHAT WAY WE EAT OUR FOOD, WE ARE ALL IN IT TOGETHER. HAVE COMPASSION FOR OTHERS AND STOP BLAMING THE WHITE MAN FOR EVERYTHING THAT HAPPENS.  AMEN.
Title: Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
Post by: Sap1 on February 13, 2018, 02:20:20 PM
I hear you Cape and I feel the same way!
Some years ago a new policy was adopted in Alberta ... "indigenous first". Especially in the north, and some colleges in the city as well. There is a lot of help out there compliments of the people who supposedly stole the land. Many are making the best of it as well. I don't know if that exists in other provinces but as you said, your neighbors are taking advantage of it and kudos to them.

I posted the article on William to show that he was also an abused child of the residential school system and how he persevered and pushed on and became what he was. That kind of greatness is available to all indigenous people. He didn't cry about the past but endeavored to make the future better. 
Title: Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
Post by: jtmtpleasant on March 07, 2018, 10:48:01 AM
A true trailblazer who let nothing stop him, not even the horrid residential schools. A fair and square lawyer in his day.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/indigenous/remembering-bill-wuttunee-1.3300662

William (Bill) Wuttunee was a man before his time. He died Fri. Oct. 30, leaving a trail that was both controversial and prescient.

Wuttunee was born May 8, 1928 on the Red Pheasant First Nation, located south of North Battleford, Sask. The reserve had a day school for the earlier grades but he had to attend residential school in Onion Lake to complete his high school.

He graduated from the University of Saskatchewan in 1954, becoming Western Canada's first status Indian lawyer at a time when most reserves had no electricity, people lived in log homes and horses were the chief means of transportation. His people were beginning a period of rapid change that would be for both better and worse.

Wuttunee was a family friend ? our families are related, although distantly. He and my dad were contemporaries who worked together to lay the foundation for the modern Federation of Saskatchewan Indians. In 1956 the leaders gathered in Fort Qu'Appelle and developed the constitution and bylaws for the federation.

Later he would work on the national level and assist in the creation of the Native Council of Canada, which evolved into the Congress of Aboriginal Peoples.

In the early 1960s he decided to concentrate on his law career and he set up a law office in Calgary. For years he practised law, later setting up a branch office in Yellowknife.

I recall the Sarcee band owed a company money and Wuttunee sued Sarcee on behalf of that company. It was considered an act of betrayal at the time. But he showed that everyone had to pay their bills and First Nations couldn't hide behind the Indian Act.

Wuttunee was also a bit of a free thinker and he publicly disagreed with the Indian Association of Alberta, in particular the organization's leader, Harold Cardinal. He felt that too much emphasis was being placed on the treaties and not enough on individual initiative.

Ruffled Feathers, William Wuttunee
William Wuttunee was a strong proponent of integration. It was the topic of his book, Ruffled Feathers, published in 1971. (Bell Books)

He was a strong proponent of integration. It was the topic of his book, Ruffled Feathers, published in 1971. It was met with scorn and derision by First Nations leaders at the time.

In retrospect, differing points of view are needed for the creation of democratic First Nations communities. His book, though now largely forgotten, was a model for other writers who would speak their mind and be critical of their people.

Gradually he reunited with his people and became accepted by the younger generation. When the first group of aboriginal lawyers set up the indigenous bar association he was invited to join.

Later, when the Truth and Reconciliation Commission was set up, he played the role of elder advisor and was one of the architects of the process.

He told his story of his days at residential school and the brutality and pain that many students suffered. He spoke of experiences that he had previously not shared with his family.

By now his life had come full circle. He was respected for his work and acknowledged as a trailblazer. And he had seen the members of his profession grow to a community of over 2,000 indigenous lawyers.

Bill Wuttunee died last Friday, at age 87, and began his next journey.


*****************

Umm, wern't you just on the Colton Boushie thread talking shit about this man and the community he resided? Now you're on this thread calling him a trailblazer. WTF lol Maybe you need a break from being a keyboard warrior, you're starting to contradict yourself.
Title: Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
Post by: jtmtpleasant on March 07, 2018, 10:52:36 AM
It just seems recently that there are a lot of inquiries into the missing persons and the MMIW Inquiry. There are thousands of people missing in Canada, not just indigenous persons. We feel sorry for the famlies of those who have gone missing, but sometimes it is because of a life style and risks they take in certain activities and that goes with whatever gender you happen to be. I am kind of tired of hearing about hearing the word
"discimination". Just yesterday here in Nova Scotia there was a young woman of Muslim faith who was very disenchanted because a hotel in Halifax could not prepare a meal she was wanting at her reception.  She cried the word "discrimination" and said it on national TV. I was very angry by her comments. That catering at the hotel could not prepare a meal of her wishes and was very angry. She even wanted to have another caterer brought in, of course the hotel refused. Then she was angry because it would cost her more money to have the function elsewhere for 200 people. Well lady, that is not our problem. If you don't like it here in Canada, go back to your homeland and have your wedding feast. The gall of her coming on TV and crying discrimination. I was so angry that I could have strangled her if she was in front of my office and making plans for a wedding reception. If any of us went over to Egypt or somewhere and said, oh, we'd like to have a boiled dinner, with cabbage and salt meat and the whole deal, I wonder what they'd tell us. Or if we wanted fish cakes and bologna or home made baked beans with molasses and I guess we'd get the boot pretty quick.  When people blame others for the trivia crap they go on with, it's disgusting. Canadians have opened their hearts to many immigrants that came over recently and year after year. They have spent millions of our tax payers dollars to feed, cloth and house others. They have come here and were made citizens. They were given Child Credit cheques for their children. They were given Old Age Security cheques and not only that, they were given settlement cheques of a great deal of money, that was not disclosed to Canadians before they came over here. We don't have much say in it, if Trudeau is spending the money, we just have to say okay. So the next election, that will be how we turn him off.

Now just another note on the ongoing discussion related to the recent tragedy in Saskatchewan.  We all feel bad that a young person lost his life. We try to look at both sides of the story and put ourselves in the position of the property owner. It is a situation that turned out badly.  I just want to add that these young people had a choice that day and it was a bad one.  I also want to add that every one of these young people have an opportunity to get an education, there is all kinds of funding for native youth to go to college, be anything they want, to get an education and get a trade.  Right next door to me is a friend that lives with my neighbor. His ex is a native. He has a daughter and she is of native status.  This young lady, a very sweet person and I really like her, she is going to Social Work College in another town.  She is getting $800.00 a month towards her rent; $350.00 every two weeks for expenses; she has her own car and is talking about getting a new one.  She is only 21 years old and is making something for her future.  She was not a lazy person and neither was her sister, they worked at a B&B all summer before they went to take a course.  They also did other jobs like working in a store.  That is just all I am saying, there are great opportunities, they are there and they must start taking advantage of the things that are available to make a better life.

To make a long story short, STOP BLAMING EVERYONE ELSE FOR YOUR FAILURES. THAT INCLUDES ANY PERSON IN CANADA, IMMIGRANTS WHO HAVE COME HERE, ORDINARY PEOPLE, WE ARE ALL ORDINARY PEOPLE, NO MATTER WHAT COLOR WE ARE, WHAT JOB WE DO, WHAT WAY WE EAT OUR FOOD, WE ARE ALL IN IT TOGETHER. HAVE COMPASSION FOR OTHERS AND STOP BLAMING THE WHITE MAN FOR EVERYTHING THAT HAPPENS.  AMEN.

************
White privilege at it's finest. Must be nice to live your life on stolen line, ignorant as all heck.

The only one who made a bad choice was the WHITE man who shot a young man's head off.

The fact is, WHITE people stole this land. WHITE people continue to rape and murder Indigenous women and men. WHITE people continue to live in a dream world with their heads up their asses, completely arrogant and ignorant to the fact that THEY are the reasons why Indigenous people are being murdered and going missing.

And maybe we need to have inquiry after inquiry after inquiry until the truth about WHITE people is finally told.

And thanks to your tax dollars, that just might happen. So keep working your assess off to pay for our inquiries.
Title: Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
Post by: Sap1 on March 07, 2018, 12:30:44 PM
A true trailblazer who let nothing stop him, not even the horrid residential schools. A fair and square lawyer in his day.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/indigenous/remembering-bill-wuttunee-1.3300662

William (Bill) Wuttunee was a man before his time. He died Fri. Oct. 30, leaving a trail that was both controversial and prescient.

Wuttunee was born May 8, 1928 on the Red Pheasant First Nation, located south of North Battleford, Sask. The reserve had a day school for the earlier grades but he had to attend residential school in Onion Lake to complete his high school.

He graduated from the University of Saskatchewan in 1954, becoming Western Canada's first status Indian lawyer at a time when most reserves had no electricity, people lived in log homes and horses were the chief means of transportation. His people were beginning a period of rapid change that would be for both better and worse.

Wuttunee was a family friend ? our families are related, although distantly. He and my dad were contemporaries who worked together to lay the foundation for the modern Federation of Saskatchewan Indians. In 1956 the leaders gathered in Fort Qu'Appelle and developed the constitution and bylaws for the federation.

Later he would work on the national level and assist in the creation of the Native Council of Canada, which evolved into the Congress of Aboriginal Peoples.

In the early 1960s he decided to concentrate on his law career and he set up a law office in Calgary. For years he practised law, later setting up a branch office in Yellowknife.

I recall the Sarcee band owed a company money and Wuttunee sued Sarcee on behalf of that company. It was considered an act of betrayal at the time. But he showed that everyone had to pay their bills and First Nations couldn't hide behind the Indian Act.

Wuttunee was also a bit of a free thinker and he publicly disagreed with the Indian Association of Alberta, in particular the organization's leader, Harold Cardinal. He felt that too much emphasis was being placed on the treaties and not enough on individual initiative.

Ruffled Feathers, William Wuttunee
William Wuttunee was a strong proponent of integration. It was the topic of his book, Ruffled Feathers, published in 1971. (Bell Books)

He was a strong proponent of integration. It was the topic of his book, Ruffled Feathers, published in 1971. It was met with scorn and derision by First Nations leaders at the time.

In retrospect, differing points of view are needed for the creation of democratic First Nations communities. His book, though now largely forgotten, was a model for other writers who would speak their mind and be critical of their people.

Gradually he reunited with his people and became accepted by the younger generation. When the first group of aboriginal lawyers set up the indigenous bar association he was invited to join.

Later, when the Truth and Reconciliation Commission was set up, he played the role of elder advisor and was one of the architects of the process.

He told his story of his days at residential school and the brutality and pain that many students suffered. He spoke of experiences that he had previously not shared with his family.

By now his life had come full circle. He was respected for his work and acknowledged as a trailblazer. And he had seen the members of his profession grow to a community of over 2,000 indigenous lawyers.

Bill Wuttunee died last Friday, at age 87, and began his next journey.


*****************

Umm, wern't you just on the Colton Boushie thread talking shit about this man and the community he resided? Now you're on this thread calling him a trailblazer. WTF lol Maybe you need a break from being a keyboard warrior, you're starting to contradict yourself.

I am not contradicting myself! I have no idea what got to you but you need to stop with your knee jerking responses. I really thought you were above that, especially with your Phd behind you.
We can discuss but not anything indigenous, is that what you are saying.

He is a trailblazer that not many seem to have followed, unfortunately. Yes, his name is associated with some that do not have the best of reputations. I will call out the differences, just as I do with WHITE people.
Title: Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
Post by: Sap1 on March 07, 2018, 12:46:23 PM
Quote jtmtpleasant:

Quote
White privilege at it's finest. Must be nice to live your life on stolen line, ignorant as all heck.

The only one who made a bad choice was the WHITE man who shot a young man's head off.

The fact is, WHITE people stole this land. WHITE people continue to rape and murder Indigenous women and men. WHITE people continue to live in a dream world with their heads up their asses, completely arrogant and ignorant to the fact that THEY are the reasons why Indigenous people are being murdered and going missing.

And maybe we need to have inquiry after inquiry after inquiry until the truth about WHITE people is finally told.

And thanks to your tax dollars, that just might happen. So keep working your assess off to pay for our inquiries.

If not a white man had entered Canada, where would you all be now. Would you have your Phd.

Yes there are whites who beat, rape and murder indigenous however stats show that much of the crime against indigenous females is by their own.

White people live in a dream world with our heads up our asses you say. That is mighty fine language from a person who is degreed. Wow. Commendable.

My family at least will not forever work our asses off to pay for inquiries as there are other places in the world, safer than Saskatchewan for sure, and my grown kids are starting the plan to move.

It would be ideal if all non indigenous people left Canada, and demolished all that has been built by the bad white people, take all our money, including white man government money.
Title: Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
Post by: Sap1 on March 07, 2018, 01:15:29 PM
I will continue to speak my mind. Amen to this author.

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/ujjal-dosanjh/white-men-political-correctness_b_8911986.html

Sadly, political correctness afflicts much of the world; in particular the Western world. At its inception in the counterculture of the sixties and beyond, it was a force for good. It moved us to examine our hatreds, prejudices, values and words.

It reminded the British and the French that their prosperity had been driven and depended partly on the plunder of their colonies. It brought home to the Americans that their reach in the world wasn't always benevolent; sometimes it was born out of their economic dominance of the world and exploitation of the resources and peoples of the world.

The U.S. blacks and the counterculture made the world pivot towards a fairer, more just and compassionate understanding of the inequality and unfairness in the world. The world began to understand gender equality, freedom for gays and lesbians to be themselves, the ugly reality of racism in the world and how North America had oppressed and marginalized the indigenous peoples and the rampant unfairness in international relations.

That extremely timely and necessary overhaul of our approach toward others made us change our language, expressions and how we addressed and viewed people who were different, and possibly weaker and poorer than us. Minorities became bolder. Equality became the buzzword underpinned by longing for social justice.

In Canada that hunger for social justice and equality manifested itself in Trudeau's just society, the egalitarian foundations of which found themselves enshrined in the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. The charter justly included a constitutional right of self-government for Canada's historically abused and exploited indigenous peoples.

Canada continues to make important strides toward more equality.

But there are storm clouds on the horizon that endanger the continuing pursuit of true equality.

What started as a legitimate change to bring about equality and transformation of how we viewed, treated and spoke about each other has now ossified into a rarely breached wall of silence, a silence reinforced by the onset of the West's indifference to its own good, bad or ugly -- but distinct -- societies, their values and norms. Call it white man's burden or guilt, a guilt for the sins of the past now manifesting itself in the white man's fear.

This fear has habituated many Western leaders in their frailty to speak the unvarnished truth about the need for the refugees and immigrants welcomed into these societies to fully integrate in them. It is not about changing one's religion or bleaching one's skin to make it paler. It is about learning the moral, ethical, social and political anchors that, in this case, Canada is rooted in.

Is Canada perfect? No. It has its own past shame of the indigenous cultural genocide, Chinese head tax, concentration camps for the Japanese-Canadians, turning away in the middle of the Second World War a ship full of Jews from the Atlantic coast and much more. But Canada has confronted many of its demons and continues the important task of reconciliation with its indigenous peoples.

But the real need for equality and social justice for all has also spawned the much despised political correctness preventing us from being honest with each other. Politicians afraid of "ethnic backlashes" revel in silence policed by the so called multiculturalists who might be more appropriately called multicults -- the practitioners of a fierce brand of exclusivist multiculturalism that ought to be renamed multicultism. Under the circumstances when politicians do speak, they utter non-sequiturs, simply bromides.

"On matters of race, religion, culture and national identity of Canada the white men are reduced to either silence or non-sequiturs."

Amongst the Western leaders Angela Merkel has been an exception. She has welcomed close to a million refugees into Germany in 2016, more generous indeed than any other Western country. At the same time she told them to integrate into German society by learning the German language and values, calling multiculturalism a sham that creates parallel societies. We can debate her position but I would caution that the parallel societies she speaks of are quite discernible in many provinces in major urban centres in Canada, too.

But out of fear many of our leaders continue in their silent bliss.

This guilt cum fear was quite evident in Premier Kathleen Wynne's broad-brush swipe at those who had sought assurances of thorough security checks on the refugees to be let into Canada. Instead of arguing we must welcome refugees but after proper security checks, her words implied that these security concerns were a mask for racism.

Such remarks stultify and intimidate honest debate. Many voices are unnecessarily compelled into silence.

A recent study by Andy Yan looked at multimillion-dollar mansions on Vancouver's West Side that are being bought with foreign money. He argued it was about recent foreign money, not race. Yan, an urban planner and adjunct professor at UBC, was hurriedly excoriated for fanning racism.

Another study of multimillion-dollar mansions on the West Side of Vancouver showed that a significant portion of owners declared incomes as low as the residents of Canada's poorest postal code --Vancouver's Downtown Eastside. The transnational migrants who buy these mansions refuse to report their global income at tax time, resulting in tax unfairness.

The question asked by the Vancouver Sun columnist Douglas Todd was who will pay taxes to support the social safety net all of us use? Not many voices from the public leadership joined that debate to ask that or similar questions. And we continue to sell Canadian citizenship to the highest bidders without debating whether doing so builds the kind of society we want.

On the other hand we continue to bring in temporary workers without a real stake in the country. They are abused and used to drive down wages for Canadians; no way to build a caring, inclusive and socially just society. But sadly we can't and don't debate the kind of society we are building out of fear for being called racists; anybody such as Andy Yan who dares to speak risks inviting our wrath.

Several years ago a report on the front page of the Vancouver Sun stated that close to a billion dollars of unaccounted and undeclared money was circulating in the construction industry in Surrey. Such massive fraud did not elicit even a peep from the usually loud public voices. It was well-known that almost all of the residential and a portion of the commercial construction was in the hands of Indo-Canadians. Complete silence reigned in the political sphere.

Fear had won again; building a better Canada lost out.

Recently there was an incident in Richmond, B.C. where a strata council executive ordained that its meetings will be conducted in Mandarin only. No English was to be allowed. At least 30 per cent of the residents of the strata in question didn't speak Mandarin. This shocking episode landed in the midst of the already hot controversy around the Chinese only signs of various commercial establishments in Richmond. The Richmond Council has failed to show any real leadership on these unnecessarily isolationist signs.

The fear of being branded racists has paralyzed the Richmond politicians.

I had been thinking about the many such instances when I read our prime minister declaring to the New York Times Magazine, "There is no core identity, no mainstream in Canada... There are shared values -- openness, respect, compassion, willingness to work hard, to be there for each other, to search for equality and justice. Those qualities are what make us the first post-national state."

On matters of race, religion, culture and national identity of Canada the white men are reduced to either silence or non-sequiturs.

Does that mean anything goes in Canada?

"Some of us have so thoroughly shamed the white men into complete submission regarding our misplaced belief that Canada has no core identity or core values."

That there is no mainstream means there are many streams. It also implies that the streams never merge and mingle; the streams live in parallel to others, isolated and apart from each other. If so, how do we build a society with high degree of social solidarity and cohesion?

How do we develop shared values that the prime minister claims we have if all the streams do not at some point merge to create the mainstream?

If Mr. Trudeau was right about the absence of Canadian core identity and mainstream, we wouldn't have any shared values.

The truth is we have a core Canadian identity. That is the reason we have the shared values that Mr Trudeau so justly and proudly speaks of.

We are not post-national -- whatever that means. But we are a country of the world. Our core identity and core values make us so. If we do not defend that core identity and the core values that define us, they will wither away. Canada will be diminished -- a tragic loss to the world that, according to Bono of U2, needs more Canadas.

It seems some of us have so thoroughly shamed the white men into complete submission regarding our misplaced belief that Canada has no core identity or core values; so much so that even our Prime Minister won't defend what was so dear to his own father -- what he had fought so hard for.

My three children and six grand children born and raised in Canada know no other country as their own. They have a great stake in a healthy, humane, socially just and prosperous Canada.

If the white men of Canada can't overcome the fear of rebuke from the enforcers of fear, Canadians can't ever have an honest debate about the state of equality, race, culture and the place and space for religion and other languages in Canada.

These are important questions that need frank debates unless we want to live in our silos, isolated from others.

Fear, shame, silence or non-sequiturs do not build great nations.

They are built by frank, fearless and honest men and women!

P.S.: Perhaps I should have anticipated the totally non-serious assertion that not all white men are silent. The silencing of most good white men has provided an opportunity for the Trumps of the world to rise. That is what happens when we suffocate or silence rational debate.
Title: Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
Post by: jobo on March 07, 2018, 06:11:04 PM
“And thanks to your tax dollars, that just might happen. So keep working your asses off to pay for our inquiries”.......
your comment truly makes me sad, jtmtpleasant...it speaks volumes.
Title: Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
Post by: Sap1 on March 09, 2018, 04:16:03 PM
Interesting link. Indigenous people also came from somewhere else. The link is a government site so it will not disappear, therefore no copying and pasting.
I know we took this all in school, social studies, but I had forgotten most of it. Since I am interested in dna history this link now means a lot more to me since dna testing in our family. I always knew we were German and slavic but results point to so much more ... American native, African, and European. 

http://www3.sympatico.ca/goweezer/canada/can0000.htm
Title: Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
Post by: capeheart on March 10, 2018, 01:00:14 PM
We have I think all been fair in our comments. We are trying to say, we see both sides of the story.   We believe there are some very bad white people, as one of the posters said, murderers, rapists and we could go on and on. What we are trying to say is, everyone has choices, that is what I stated and it does not matter what color your skin is, you could be in the wrong place at the wrong time. I have a friend who has a son missing for about 16 years, he is white, she never had anyone contact her about him missing until last year. The police feel he was murdered in another province of Canada, his body was never found, so that is just an example. There are many out there missing and presumed dead. It is like trying to find a needle in a hay stack.  There is a native Reserve here just about three miles from me.  We go up there for a coffee at Tim's, we shop in their Drug Store, we go to their small casinos, they have a brand new arena, they have a walking track in the arena, My friend and I were up there walking the track. And actually most of the people there were not native persons, they were locals that use their facility.  They are fine and generous people. We are not saying a word about your personalities or your community.   We all have a right to opinions and  do not hate anybody. We do not hate, if someone has done you wrong in some sense, it is that person you should be angry with and not the whole of Canada.  That is all I have to say on this. 
Title: Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
Post by: Sap1 on May 14, 2018, 11:19:55 PM
People are not happy all across Canada. Several people organizing the inquiry have left, but the head of the inquiry, Judge Buller said the show will go on. They had an 8 month late start which she claimed was her doing due to organization at the beginning and she also stated they will need much more time and at least another 60 million.
I don't understand why they forged ahead when there were many complaints from the very people the inquiry was to help.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatoon/mother-danita-bigeagle-mmiw-concerns-1.4115870

Diane Bigeagle says she hasn't been very impressed with the national Inquiry Into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls.

Today, Bigeagle, along with many Indigenous families and organizations across the country, signed an open letter stating that the inquiry "is in serious trouble" and needs to "fundamentally shift its approach."

"We're all frustrated," said Bigeagle. "It's going too slow."

Families, activists demand extension to 'disorganized, haphazard' missing and murdered inquiry?
Missing and Murdered: Danita Faith Bigeagle
?Families disagree with MMIWG inquiry commission's reason to postpone hearings
Earlier this month, an inquiry spokesperson told reporters that the commission wouldn't hold hearings this summer because families would be hunting or travelling during that time. The delay is only one of many problems families have had with the process.

"How many of us that have missing and murdered people are going to go trapping and hunting?" she said. "I found that so ridiculous."

Bigeagle's daughter, Danita Faith, has been missing since 2007. After her disappearance, her mother has become an outspoken advocate for missing and murdered Indigenous women.

It isn't an option for this inquiry to fail. There are too many families that have been waiting for it.
- Professor Julie Kaye
She said an inquiry hearing in Regina last year was chaotic, with family members shouting at the inquiry. She said her hearing did not have elders present, something that could have helped defuse a tense situation.

"If you're having a problem, they're the ones you go to, to those old men sitting in the corner," she said. "They'll calm you down. They'll reason with you. They'll tell you this is what's going to happen."

Bigeagle said the inquiry hasn't done a good job at communicating with families and she is frustrated it won't be looking into possible police misconduct.


Danita Faith Bigeagle was last seen in 2007. (Sheryl Rennie/CBC)
"When they first came to Regina, we thought it was going along really good," she said. "Then it was like they hit a brick wall."

Failure not an option
Bigeagle isn't alone. People across the country have been voicing their displeasure on the inquiry's work.

"There are feelings of being retraumatized," said University of Saskatchewan professor Julie Kaye, one of the letter's signatories. "A lot of concern has been raised across the country."

Kaye said a number of concerns, from the inquiry's independence from the federal government to meetings that were suddenly cancelled, have created doubt for families.

"All these things have created a lot of uncertainty and confusion among the community," she said. "The need for strong leadership that really has that overarching vision in mind."

However, Kaye said she is hopeful the inquiry will be able to turn itself around.

"It isn't an option for this inquiry to fail," she said. "There are too many families that have been waiting for it, and are needing to see it work."

The commission is mandated to submit an interim report by Nov. 1 and produce a final report exactly one year later.

The commission has stated it intends to submit the interim report by its deadline and fulfil its mandate.
Title: Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
Post by: Sap1 on May 14, 2018, 11:22:26 PM
http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/mmiwg-inquiry-letter-extension-1.4115681


Missing and murdered inquiry needs extension and new approach, families and activists say
Letter from Indigenous leaders and grassroots activists complain families have been 'left in the dark'
John Paul Tasker · CBC News · Posted: May 15, 2017 3:06 PM ET | Last Updated: May 15, 2017

Prominent Indigenous leaders and activists are urging Marion Buller, chief commissioner of the national inquiry into missing and murdered indigenous women and girls, to seek an extension to its mandate. (Darryl Dyck/Canadian Press )
A number of prominent Indigenous leaders and grassroots activists are demanding a fundamental rethink of the entire inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls, as concerns about delays, bad communication, and poor organization begin to boil over.

In a letter sent to the inquiry's chief commissioner, former B.C. judge Marion Buller, the signatories warn that, in their eyes, the inquiry is in such a sorry state that it must secure an extension to its original timeline.

"We are deeply concerned with the continued lack of communication that is causing anxiety, frustration and confusion, and with disappointment in this long-awaited process," the letter says. "We request that you, as leader of this inquiry, substantially rework your approach in order to regain trust and ensure that families are no longer feeling retraumatized in this process."

The first interim report of the landmark inquiry is due Nov. 1, 2017, giving commissioners only a few months to meet with families and other interveners who want to provide testimony. The inquiry announced last week that it would suspend planned family meetings until the fall — citing demands from family members who will be out on the land this summer hunting — and will now hear from experts on violence against women instead.

The final report is expected by the end of 2018.

The commission has said it intends to submit its reports by those deadlines, and fulfil its mandate as set out in its terms of reference.

"The timeframe for this inquiry is clearly too short," the writers say in response to the commission's insistence an extension is not necessary.

"We recommend that you formally request an extension now rather than wait. This will enable you to use the time this summer to seriously consider how the inquiry can be reformatted to address the myriad of concerns being raised widely across the country."

A spokesperson for Indigenous Affairs Minister Carolyn Bennett said the Liberal government is confident the inquiry has enough time and resources to get its important work done.

Inquiry has faced delays
The letter's signatories, including more than 50 people and organizations, say proceedings so far have been "shrouded in secrecy," with dribs and drabs about the inquiry's process leaked to the news media.

The inquiry has been plagued by delays and personnel problems, and its director of communications, Michael Hutchinson, was let go, after only a few months of service. CBC News has also learned that Sue Montgomery, senior communications adviser with the inquiry commission, has resigned and will be leaving as of June 2.

Families disagree with MMIWG inquiry commission's reason to postpone hearings
Families unsure whether to take part in missing Indigenous women inquiry
MMIWG inquiry won't hear from most families until the fall
Families of victims now say they have been left in the dark by the commission about when and where meetings will take place, giving the impression meetings are "invitation only." They fear the "family" hearings will leave out some voices, including homeless people and those engaged in sex industries.

There is also concern that many of the directors and staff working for the committee have not yet had proper "trauma-informed" training, something the commission has promised will be done in June.

They also point to the proliferation of lawyers working with the inquiry as something that could further bog down the process, at the expense of "known and respected advocates. There is widespread perception and concern that the inquiry is too legalistic in its operations to date, and that a legal lens is dominating the inquiry's pursuit of its mandate."

The national inquiry is a key part of the federal government's reconciliation efforts with Canada's Indigenous people. The five-person panel was appointed last August by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to spend two years investigating why so many Indigenous women and girls have been murdered or gone missing.
Title: Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
Post by: Sap1 on April 07, 2019, 12:26:59 PM
After some research, I believe I have come full circle. Much has been reported,stated, researched by those in power, but why does government not set us straight. Why do reporters and media in general not report this.

If I have offended anyone with previous comments, I apologize now.

There are more articles on the Net but I will include one piece here following if anyone wants to comment.

 
Title: Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
Post by: jellybean on April 07, 2019, 02:06:08 PM
I have a dear friend who happens to be Cree.  She had an English last name.
She told me that when natives were compelled to register with an Indian Agent, he would register them with an English last name.

So, they were stripped of their language, heritage and family names for generations to come.

jb
Title: Re: MMIW Inquiry 20160803
Post by: Sap1 on April 07, 2019, 04:39:39 PM
Government did that with people from Europe when they were escaping Hitler's wrath. My father's and mother's names were changed. Many kids I went to school with (from European countries and mainly Germany) said their names were changed as well. I always thought it might a problem with deciphering by English speaking government officials. Most of the paperwork foreigners had with them was foreign language and in Latin script. I don't think that way anymore.

In the case of the trust fund for FN people's, it seems that the Brits were the only ones to stick with their agreements with treaty indigenous people. Then government takes over. None of programs come from Canadian taxpayers.